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Titanium CR 123 battery observation-

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by filthy infidel, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. filthy infidel

    filthy infidel 100% Infidel

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    I bought a fifty pack of these six years ago from a popular battery place online. Initially they worked great, and as they are indeed nearing the second half of their shelf life, I've noticed some things. In October I popped a pair in my Fenix TK 11 and it was in pulse (battery conserve) mode.
    The next four or five installs on LED and incan light seemed dimmer than normal.
    Last week our security system began alerting us to low batts in the downstairs smoke detector. Today the company called me at work to schedule a visit so when I got home I replaced the batteries. From the get go the alarm alerted to low batteries.
    A quick $13 trip later I had two new Energizer batteries installed.
    My lesson is not to buy a gross of these that may sit around. Around here my primary lights run rechargeable 123 batteries but I had higher expectations at six years.
     
  2. ray9898

    ray9898

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    Put them on a multi-meter and see what they show.
     

  3. 686Owner

    686Owner NRA Life Member

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    Are they actually lithium batteries? Did they have an expiration date? I've never seen a CR123 that wasn't lithium, and lithium is supposed to be good for 10 years.
     
  4. banger

    banger

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    Actually, a battery is strongest and will last the longest in use the day it is made.

    As the battery ages, it loses some of its strength and longevity each and every day.

    For the first few years, this decline is not always noticeable...but is is happening.

    When battery manufacturers state on their products that they have a 10 year shelf life, it is not to mean that they are just as good as a "fresh battery'.

    The dating merely indicates that it has useful energy for that period of time.

    At six years I would expect a "useful" period of use, but not the performance of a recently made one.

    Factor in that storage conditions also play a heavy factor in how well it retains it's energy.

    As you can no doubt tell, most of this is written in couched terms. This is because there are nearly an infinite variety of variables that effect battery performance.

    As a final question to you....How old were the batteries when you purchased them?

    Most manufacturers print a date for expiration, however some print a date of manufacture and allow you to figure out when it is expected to fail.
     
  5. Sporaticus

    Sporaticus Aw sheet main

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    You have to test batteries under a load.



    If you want a great resource for battery chemistries and their characteristics,

    http://www.buchmann.ca/


    ETA: you didn't mention if they were rechargeable or not. Lithium batteries develop a layer of "passivation" that help make it's shelf life so long, but also effect is performance.

    Read up on it here:

    http://www.spectrumbatteries.com/id6.html
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012