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Located in the town where we spend the winters (and where I am right now). Been through the tour. Very interesting. The docent who walked us thought the place was interesting. Had to be a tough position to work in. If you ever launch you know that you've effectively committed suicide.
 

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Located in the town where we spend the winters (and where I am right now). Been through the tour. Very interesting. The docent who walked us thought the place was interesting. Had to be a tough position to work in. If you ever launch you know that you've effectively committed suicide.
Green Valley, AZ; I've been there a few times. You might have even seen one of my uniforms that I donated to them

Hours and hours of boredom punctuated by moments of stark terror.

;)

Not really suicide. We did have provisions for a month's worth of food and water and a pretty good CBR filter on the air intakes. If we didn't get dug out of the ground by an incoming Russian missile we would have survived for a month or so under ground. After that, standing orders were to get back to the base if it was still there or hook up with other crews.

Some sites had a female " Pad Chief " assigned, so if the war happened between 9 and 5 on a weekday, she would have been there for the duration. So there was always that. :D

If you had not launched during the initial attack ( held in reserve for some reason ) and had a real live missile to babysit, there was a fair chance you could become

" King of the World ".
 

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Willie Pete, the docent that took us on the tour was a woman, who, if memory serves, had been a major. She went through the whole month's worth of food deal. I still didn't find the idea attractive.

For the record, I was in the USAF (64~68). Russian linguist, Security Service. I tell people that the reason I served in the USAF was, I was non-violent...
 

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I had a buddy that when people asked him if he had served in the military he would say "no, I was in the Air Force."

ouch.jpg


;)
 

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Willie Pete, the docent that took us on the tour was a woman, who, if memory serves, had been a major. She went through the whole month's worth of food deal. I still didn't find the idea attractive.

For the record, I was in the USAF (64~68). Russian linguist, Security Service. I tell people that the reason I served in the USAF was, I was non-violent...
If she was a short blond haired woman named Yvonne Morris; she is now the museum director.

Missile duty was not my first choice. I had originally volunteered to go to SEA to get out of Texas ( no trees in the part I was in ). Two weeks before my port call, the war in VN ended and they didn't need me there then. My replacement was already in TX, so I sat there a few weeks while they looked around for another assignment.

Finally I was " involuntarily cross trained " into missiles. Luckily , I wound up in Titan in Arkansas instead of Minuteman at one of the northern tier bases were you plugged in your car in the wintertime. That would have been bad for a Southern boy.
 

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Yup, short blonde she was!
 

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Yup, short blonde she was!
She was a Crew Commander at D-M after they started letting women on crew, both Officer and Enlisted in the late 70's. It was designated as a combat situation and women were not allowed in combat positions back then. I don't remember any all female crews but I was getting out of missiles just as females started coming into the crew force.

The only real accommodation they made for the female crew members was the movable curtain that you can see in the portion of the tour video that shows the bedroom.
 
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