Time to throw in the towel on remote grade school?

Discussion in 'Political Issues' started by Dave Lively, Sep 26, 2020.

  1. Yes, close the schools until in person classes can resume

    9 vote(s)
    40.9%
  2. No, remote is better than nothing

    13 vote(s)
    59.1%
  1. Dave Lively

    Dave Lively

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    Talking to my coworkers with K-6 children and my grandkids I get the impression trying to teach a first grader on Zoom is a waste of time for the student, teacher, parent and anyone else involved. Rather than keep pretending the kids are getting an education we would be better off closing the schools, furloughing the teachers and saving some money until in person classes can resume.

    The school district my grandkids are in are giving parents the choice of in person or remote education and last spring things went so poorly with the remote option they are attending in person despite living with someone with health issues that make COVID a real threat.

    But I do not have any kids that age living with me and am getting my information second hand. Do those of you with children "attending" elementary school remotely feel the same or is it not as bad as I have heard?
     
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  2. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    A better idea - remote teaching materials for parents and tests to give credit for grade levels.

    Of course, we will never do that because it would break kids out of the indoctrination camps and it's probably "racially discriminatory," according to democrats.
     
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  3. DannyB

    DannyB

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    I think it is pretty close to a waste of time. However, you can't furlough teachers or you won't have teachers when it is over. I know there are plenty of other professions with furloughs. But we cannot do without teachers.
     
  4. 0311INF

    0311INF

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    I've got a 2nd grader doing the remote thing since March and it's been brutal. Teaching kids that age with Zoom and video and Google classroom assignments is a joke. Parents have to work as well, I don't understand how they expect us to hover over kids all day.

    But the state is opening up... he goes back to full 5 day real school next month, hooray!
     
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  5. ExecutiveWill

    ExecutiveWill

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    I chose to keep my first grader home until October. I’m taking a strong presence in his home schooling, and he’s now ahead of other classmates in math and reading.
    And we studied the American revolution and the first American flag.

    So... it is what a parent can make of it I guess. I still work full time after his classes end.
     
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  6. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    And if that's never? There is no guarantee the vaccine will get developed or that it will work. There's no guarantee the thing doesn't mutate right out from under the vaccine.

    I get it, parents don't want to be proxy teachers and, more than anything else, they want to get back to earning money.

    There is also the high probability that when kids go back to school, they will get infected and bring it home to the family. CV-19 isn't kind to old people.

    Look at what's happening on campuses and schools across the country. There was never any justification for returning to in-person learning at this stage of the pandemic.
     
  7. norton

    norton

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    Yes you can. There are many people involved in other professions that would make excellent teachers. Even people with H.S. only educations could teach elementary students the skills they need to progress on into middle and high school. That teachers currently working are a select breed is nonsense made up by teacher unions.
     
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  8. Mathemagician1

    Mathemagician1

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    We made the same decision and this has been our experience as well. Our 5th grader got moved to 7th grade math after about 2 weeks and is doing very well. We have to prep and participate, of course, but it's more learning and less time/pain than even regular school. If not for the social aspect I doubt we'd ever send her back.
     
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  9. OXMYX

    OXMYX

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    Strange how the anti-vaxxers have taken over the democrats. The same folks that make fun of anti-vaxxers.

    Trump Syndrome
     
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  10. Mathemagician1

    Mathemagician1

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    Nonsense.

    - Kids are neither susceptible to becoming sick nor good spreaders of this virus. There have been virtually zero documented transmissions from child to adult.

    - About 50k university students tested positive. Of these, there have been two hospitalizations and zero deaths.

    - Several "superspreader" events have come and gone with zero measurable impact. Remember Sturgis? Every Trump rally? What about the homeless, who ignore precautions and congregate freely? Where are the piles of bodies in the streets?

    - Hospitals and the health care system are in no way being pushed to capacity. That's not a thing anymore.

    - The severity of the virus has gone WAY down, which is the normal course of events.

    upload_2020-9-26_14-57-58.png
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    ^ Yes, that's 2 per million.

    This virus is never going away. Ever. Don't make that a criteria for living your life again, and if you do, definitely don't try to force it on me.
     
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  11. Dave Lively

    Dave Lively

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    Humanity is not going to sit inside hiding from COVID forever. If the vaccine doesn't work we are going to accept the death toll and go forward.

    A useful vaccine is not guaranteed but is likely. Not a 100% effective vaccine, maybe not a 100% safe vaccine but one that reduces the chances of contracting the virus and reduces the severity if you do catch it enough that people will go back to work and school.

    Even if a vaccine is never is developed there will come a point where people decide the current restrictions are unsustainable. I hope it doesn't come to that and think it is worth waiting until a vaccine is developed and deployed or proven to be impossible. But people are not going to live this way forever.
     
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  12. Csv

    Csv

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    The end of last school year was a **** show. With so much up in the air we committed our kids to a year of virtual school through the school district, instead of the alternative. I think the consistency is important and number one reason why we switched.

    The virtual school has its own teachers, a totally different platform to manage online learning, work at their own pace within reason, etc. We are both able to work from home made it an easy choice for us.

    Their home schools are still online but at some point when they return it will be days at home with days at school each week.

    My kids are excelling with the virtual school. The only negative would be close interaction with other kids, but that isn't happening through school right now anyway.
     
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  13. SBroadwell

    SBroadwell

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    Kids here have been back in school about a month now. No major issues. A few have been quarantined but nothing serious.
    We need to just move on past this
     
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  14. CAcop

    CAcop

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    We got our kids into homeschool. I wasn't sold on it until the governor mandated 5 days a week, 5 hours a day of zoom classes. The school only wanted 2 days of optional home school for 1.5 for those two days. I was okay with that.

    Last year sitting through one 1.5 hour meeting a day for the 8 year old and one 20 minute class per day with an additional 20 minutes sometime in the week for the 6 year old was pretty pointless.

    Allegedly since we are off the watch list in our county they may go back to in person learning full time by January when the new trimester opens up. Of course if cases jump then they will shut it down and wait until the final trimester.

    Our area got hosed they think because of the tech show Vegas puts on every January. People from all over the world, with lots of people from China, seeded the show then they all came back. Santa Clara County got hit the hardest in the Bay even though SF and Oakland have higher population densities which usually make the spread easier vs Santa Clara County which is suburban defined with some rural areas.

    If they can keep the numbers down for a solid 3-6 months with things opened up I will send the kids back.
     
  15. n2g

    n2g Georgia gal

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    I just saw this latest post when I was about to hit "Post reply," and I agree:


    Distance learning isn't very effective for the very early grades, but it's better than nothing, so that's how I voted. It's not as difficult for older students but still not as good as classroom learning. One of my children taught junior and senior courses in college, both classroom and online, and said that's true even at that level.

    I'm a retired elementary teacher and I can't imagine how hard it is for students, teachers, and parents with some students online and others in the classroom at the same time, as they are now doing in my school system.

    I'm for a third option unless covid gets worse than it is now. Open the schools and let kids come back to school. Take as many precautions as are practical, but kids need to get back to school unless they are at higher risk.

    Two sets of my grandkids are back in class this year. One has had covid but only ran a fever for a couple of days and then slept a lot. I know a few do get much sicker, but kids seem to usually have mild cases. She goes back to class when the school system gets the hurricane damage repaired, hopefully this week.

    For the record, I think covid has been greatly politicized especially in liberal states, but it also is a real thing that kills people. I personally know of several who have died, and most had no other health problems. I also think masks do help; otherwise doctors and nurses wouldn't have worn them for decades when dealing with droplet-spread diseases. I'm at higher risk and I wear a mask if I'm going to be around groups of people, and I stay home a lot. However...

    That said, we cannot keep huge parts of the nation closed down, and we cannot keep handing out trillions of dollars that take away the motivation to return to work and be productive. There is no perfect solution but people not at higher risk have got to get back to normal as much as they can at some point. They can still choose to take precautions. People here (Georgia) have mostly been back at work for months now, or could be if they didn't bring home more money staying at home than working.

    Every parent I've talked with wants their children to go back to school as it was pre-covid unless they already were home schooling.



    As a retired elementary teacher, just a few comments on the above. First, I never belonged to a teacher union, nor did the other teachers in my system. And I certainly don't think we are "a select breed." We are trained professionals, however.

    There are certification requirements that must be met before one can get a teaching job. This is not a bad thing. In my state it doesn't require a new degree, but it does require some additional college courses in education to get certification if you already have a degree. Without a degree, I don't know whether there are options or not.

    There are many people who would make good teachers, but certainly not everyone. Even most of those who would still need some training. There is a lot more to knowing how to teach than may be apparent at first glance. Early childhood education majors don't go to college to learn our alphabet and how to count, LOL. We get a lot of child development, learning theory, methods, and special ed instruction along with curriculum planning and legal aspects among other things. When I got my education degrees I was already the mother of three excellent students and had worked as a kindergarten assistant for three years, and I still learned a lot. Unrelated to skills of teaching, there are also many state requirements that must be met about which I wouldn't have had a clue otherwise. A classroom isn't a homogenous group so individual needs have to be met. I could go on and on. You don't just walk in and wing it.

    I guess it's a job that looks easy but to think that just anyone can walk in off the street and do a good job isn't realistic. Even after getting an education degree, most beginning teachers are overwhelmed at first.

    That said, teachers aren't any better than anyone else to have to draw unemployment, but totally closing schools including no online teaching would be insane and most students would suffer.

    Btw, in my school almost to a person the faculty was conservative and patriotic, and the majority probably had several guns in their homes. Not all of us are snowflakes. I do think the education system has been headed in the wrong direction in many ways, but that could be thesis material.






    Trump/Republican 2020
     
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  16. Dave Lively

    Dave Lively

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    Glad to hear remote school is working better than I thought for many of you. This wouldn't be the first time I was overly pessimistic.

    I still think sitting out a semester or year should be an option for kids that are struggling with mandatory remote classes or have parents with jobs that prevent them from working with their kids throughout the day. It sounds like most of you that are having good results are able to spend a lot of time working with your kids. More home school than remote school. Not everyone has a job that allows that.
     
  17. MB-G26

    MB-G26 Ornery & Irreverent Lifetime Member

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    I am very glad my only offspring is age 30 and quite successfully off living his own happy & productive life (burb of ATL, n2g ;) ) so I do not have to grapple with all this. I am in NO way smart enought about a lot of things INCLUDING ANY MATH :blarf: to have been even marginally adequate as his home school teacher.

    In his early elementary years, I did pul him out of school for a couple of weeks at a time, twice while vigorously pursuing admin correction of a horrendous bullying situation-- ended in a bully criminal arrest & eventual expulsion [but not until I had to go full meal deal on school & district admin.) During those times, I drove to his school & picked up new assignments, and turned in the completed ones from the day before.

    I had two teachers in my family - and I know I just have NOT got a brain wide enough to be able to teach across the board of subjects. Being really good at ~3 things, but absolutely daft in at least 7 others -- no way I could have done long-term right by him [gifted off the map, per testing] over the long term.

    I just wish the whole stupid kinda-sorta-does-kill-some-but.... pan/scan/Chinademic was OVER!!
     
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  18. Bradley T

    Bradley T

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    Well, school should just resume. Masks should just be discarded and people should stop gossiping, or "expert-opinioning" our world into ruination. Enough with the fake already. IT'S FAKE! Fauci just supposes some scenarios he gathered from the Africa/Asia disease catalogue that he wishes we would get so he can keep being a star!
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2020
  19. dave333

    dave333

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    I’ve got a 3rd grader and 6th grader remote learning. Better than nothing but not by much. Starting part time face to face in a couple weeks, my kids are actually wanting to go back to school. With this overblown reaction to the COVID I can’t imagine what’s gonna happen if we have a bad flu season. Mandatory bubbles for everyone to live in?
     
  20. n2g

    n2g Georgia gal

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    I don't doubt you and many others have the brain for teaching; there's just a lot more to it than you think until you start doing it! I can't say that I'm not very glad I'm retired now.

    I'll be glad when Mr. CV goes away, too, or mostly goes away at least.

    2020 is a year that not too many will ever forget, for a lot of reasons.








    Trump/Republican 2020
     
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