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Oh, for a muse of fire
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That she was. :) The envy of any woman, and the desire of any man. The silver screen lost her way too soon when she found her charming prince. :)
Here's another, gone too soon. Over the years I have met many women who looked like a current film star, or one of the classic stars of the 30's and 40's. I have yet to meet any woman that resembled Jean Harlow, even a little.

 

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Polymerlicious!
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"Rear Window", with so many of the character's neighbors leaving their windows uncovered, was not totally realistic, although in those days before air conditioning was universal, people often did leave their windows open and the curtains or blinds open as well to try to get some air moving into the home. Another aspect of this film that I guess I had forgotten was just how gorgeous Grace Kelly was.
Excellent observations in this post.
And I still say Grace Kelly is the most beautiful woman I've ever seen.
 

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Biggest thing I've noticed watching older TV and movies is how regular a lot of the people look, not Hollywood perfect.
 

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Not sure why you think this is "men ...dressed as boys". Seems to me that people dress more for comfort than to meet some arbitrary fashion standard. Wearing a jacket in the heat of the desert, with a tie no less, seems absurd to me. And women's dress has also changed mostly for the better. Ask women you know if they wish times changed back to where they were expected to wear stockings/pantyhose and high heels whenever they left the house.
I personally feel that putting absolutely no effort into your appearance is disrespectful to your hosts, social or business company, setting, etc...especially when it's so easy to exercise a little discipline and dress halfway decent today as compared to times past. Decent clothing is so much more affordable, readily available, easier to care for, etc. and all the while existing in a world where it's easy to be comfortable wearing almost anything. Hint, the average environment today is way cleaner and more comfortable (air conditioning!) than it was back when the average person actually put a little effort into their presentation.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Biggest thing I've noticed watching older TV and movies is how regular a lot of the people look, not Hollywood perfect.
Plastic surgery was not as advanced as it is today, and breast implants were not the norm. Botox had not even been invented.

But some aspects of older movies make us cringe today. The fight scenes in many old movies were so poorly done and so obviously fake that our "suspension of disbelief" while watching a fictional story on the big screen is jarringly interrupted. But in those old films we almost always could easily understand what the characters were saying. They did not talk over one another, they enunciated their words and didn't feel obligated to drop "F bombs" every third word. Once the "method acting" of actors like Marlon Brando (who despite that was a highly gifted actor) dialogue sometimes became slurred and unintelligible. I add that to my loss of hearing now and I miss half of what was said in modern movies, unless I am watching them on my TV with closed captions (which used to be needed only for foreign language movies).
 

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Use it up, throw it away
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I watch some silent films, partly for a look into the past and partly because some of them are done so well. Where Are My Children (1916), The Crowd (1928), Scar Of Shame (1927) are just a few of many standouts.

Many of Buster Keaton’s films have great outdoor shots. Side note: In 1920 Keaton was earning $5000/week at a time when my Grandmother’s house in South Central Los Angeles cost $2500.
 

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Yesterday I watched two Alfred Hitchcock films, both starring Jimmy Steward. One was "The Man Who Knew Too Much" made in 1955 and the other was "Rear Window" made in 1954.

My first thought was how well the films hold up, even to today's technical and style standards. Dialogue was mostly realistic, not the melodramatic style the movies from just a few years earlier had

But many of them, were also shown as being strong and brave, as she was when she sang Que Sera Sera through the halls of that mansion. (I think that I did a pretty good job of not posting a "spoiler" :) ) And Grace Kelly, who you mention below, in High Noon.

That she was. :) The envy of any woman, and the desire of any man. The silver screen lost her way too soon when she found her charming prince. :)
Excellent points all around. The nice thing in Hitchcock movies people (feminazis) fail to realize, Hitchcok women weren't damsels in distress. Kelly preforms some daring, brave acts; Doris Day is hardly a wallflower; and who can forget Eva Marie Saint in "North by Northwest." They were strong characters (and Hitch loved his blondes and obsessed about their wardrobes).

The Thin Man series are some of my favorites. Lots of class, lots of cocktails, a dog named Asta, and did I mention that Myrna Loy was a knockout?
Another great example. The first and third are directly based on Dashiell Hammett's works, the first, novel by the same name and an unrelated short story for Another Thin Man.

We have lost a lot, class wise. Look at a young Babe Ruth. Everyone watching is wearing a coat, tie and hat.


Now all you have to do is go to Walmart to see how far we have gone.

People were just classier over all, even the lowlifes. A HS acquaintance shot this just as the Covid lockdown happened, I added the caption.

 

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Did you notice Raymond Burr in “Rear Window?” It was pre Perry Mason, when he was usually cast as a heavy.
He plays the heavy in several Noirs as well.
 

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Plastic surgery was not as advanced as it is today, and breast implants were not the norm. Botox had not even been invented.

But some aspects of older movies make us cringe today. The fight scenes in many old movies were so poorly done and so obviously fake that our "suspension of disbelief" while watching a fictional story on the big screen is jarringly interrupted. But in those old films we almost always could easily understand what the characters were saying. They did not talk over one another, they enunciated their words and didn't feel obligated to drop "F bombs" every third word. Once the "method acting" of actors like Marlon Brando (who despite that was a highly gifted actor) dialogue sometimes became slurred and unintelligible. I add that to my loss of hearing now and I miss half of what was said in modern movies, unless I am watching them on my TV with closed captions (which used to be needed only for foreign language movies).
Part of the issue is, in the golden age, movie actors came from the stage. They had to learn to project their voices so the audience could hear.
Today actors mumble, and dropping curse words is the sign of street cred.
 

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10mm Philosopher
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Wanna watch an 'Old School' film with a plot on a radical level? ... before there were social-media censors? :headscratch:

Good. :thumbsup:

Get The Fountainhead, starring Gary Cooper, which was adapted from Ayn Rand's best-selling novel of the same title.

Guaranteed to wake some Lefty mofos up.

View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AX4MKIDvXLM

:laughabove:
 
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Zod was in Groundhog Day? Oh, yeah, the young couple! I love that movie. Probably Bill Murray's best film. Either that or Scrooged.
What about Venkman in Ghostbusters? Or his role in Caddyshack? The scene where he recounts meeting the Dalai Lama...


Also forget his performance in "Stripes"!

View: https://youtu.be/x1GjScu_uHE
 

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Recently watched 55 Days at Peking with David Niven, Charlton Heston and Ava Gardner. Also caught her the other day on TCM in Mogamba.

Ava Gardner was mesmerizing. She catches your attention in anything she's in.

Oh, and there is a biography of her on Amazon Prime.
 

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Gary Cooper would look funny with ginger orange hair AND his Howard Roark monologue delivery sucks... Patricia Neal as well (weak acting) IMO. Ayn Rand was a Do As I Say, Not As I Do kinda person IMO also. Sad that. Fountainhead is full of TEH SUCK. (again IMO - YMMV)

Some old movies do well with the test of time. Others, less so.

Bob Altman, a K.C. boy (McCabe & Mrs Miller, M.A.S.H., Nashville and other movies) made the multiple actors talking at same time schtick trendy.

I liked Bill Murray in TOOTSIE as Hoffman's roomie Jeff (non credited in film but he was there)
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Maybe I'm in a minority but I didn't care for "Tootsie" even when it first came out. Too cheesy for me.
 

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Some old ie (Pre WWII ? ) movies have held up well. I only got about 1/2 way into Fritz Lang's 30's classic M (not so loosely based on Peter Kurten's murder spree.)

But at the outset the police commissioner is interviewing one of his flunkies about how the crime scenes were being treated
and the depth of detail and analytical efforts you would swear would come from a scene of CSI.

The later when the city's underworld gets together to plot a response (cause the cops and their efforts were badly cutting into business) you had some women that were pretty obvious bordello staff and for a 30's movie in Germany their trade wasn't even remotely concealed but front and center.

I will finish that movie some day.
 

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My 4 year old grandson wanted to watch Clifford the Big Red Dog today (I let him) -

He ask me if I watched it when I was a little boy - I said no - back when I was a little boy TV was in black and white only and Clifford the Big Red Dog wasn't a show yet -

Then I added - the TV could not show colors - no red, blue, yellow, green - only white black and shades of gray - so they couldn't have a show about a red dog.

He gave me a funny look - like the one when I am playing a joke on him - he can't imagine TV without colors.

My best joke last week - he wanted a snack - Goldfish crackers - I opened the small bag - dumped out the "goldfish" and put a marshmallow in the bottom of the package - then put the goldfish crackers back in the bag on top.

After he ate a few he yells out GRANDPA there is a marshmallow in the goldfish!

So I go out and say - WOW Charlie - are you sure? How did that happen?

He thinks for like 2 seconds and says - You can't fool me grandpa - YOU DID IT!

Damn - kid is way smarter that I was at 4 -
 
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