Thoughts on the new M&P 2.0 Compact

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by BigMick, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. happyguy

    happyguy Man, I'm Pretty

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    There are a lot of MP's in service and you rarely see failures of this sort. MP's are good to go.

    Regards,
    Happyguy :)
     
  2. JL1103

    JL1103

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    I would welcome the excuse to upgrade to a nickel boron barrel. "But honey I had to spend the $200, my barrel broke"
     
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  3. Gfive45

    Gfive45

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  4. Hank Was Right

    Hank Was Right

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    I would only buy one if it was a great price, though not because I have any specific criticism of the gun. I already have a G19 and G23, both gen3, and I don’t see the Smith doing anything significantly enough better to justify the investment. By investment, I mean a lot of magazines, spare parts, and leather. I feel the same about the Walther PPQ and Beretta APX.

    I’m to the point now where I primarily want to simplify things. If I get any additional firearms in the next year, they will be more examples of the ones I already have. I already have plenty of spare parts and mags for certain models, and I see no need to complicate things with a different platform. (Unless I find that certain new in the box S&W 4006 for an irresistible price.)

    I also tend to only want those guns that have thoroughly been wrung out by years of law enforcement or military use. Glocks, metal Sigs, Beretta, etc. I’m too old to be a beta tester.
     
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  5. JL1103

    JL1103

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    I'm with you on that. The last time I strayed from Glock. I needed to send my gun back to springfield to have the breech re-cut. I'm leaning toward getting the new g17. Not sure if I will be able to effectively conceal the 19x with those extended mags. So why not go for the advantage of a slightly longer barrel that the 17 offers.

    The only thing is the M&P 2.0 is $150 cheaper with better sights.
     
  6. Wagrn

    Wagrn

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    Sportsman had the m&p compact both flavors and with and without safety for $399.
     
  7. cliffb

    cliffb

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    I bought a LE version compact with 3 mags and NS for $412. Got it in .40 just because I didn't want another 9mm. Well, I'm no stranger to Glocks or M&Ps. This 2.0 Compact has quickly become my favorite pistol. Perfect size, accurate and reliable. Soft shooting even in .40 S&W. It feels great in my hand. It has a very good and usable trigger right out of the box, unlike most of the prior model M&Ps I've had. I bought a couple of used full size magazines from Aim Surplus and they run without issues.

    Bottom line is I like it a lot. If I was going to keep carrying a pistol on a professional basis it would be this one or maybe a full size version.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
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  8. Gfive45

    Gfive45

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  9. DonD

    DonD

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    I wandered into the local Bass Pro Shops and handled one of the 2.0 compacts. Felt better in my hand than any semi I've ever touched, liked the trigger.

    Had to ask the counter guy to take the trigger lock off. Really? I wouldn't think much of the smarts of an individual who would buy a gun having never even pulled the trigger. At least they were smart enough to put a snap cap in the gun.

    So, the 5" barreled M&P9 2.0 is due at my local gunsmith's tomorrow afternoon, cost $430 from Sportsmens Outdoor SS, BP wanted $599 for the compact.

    Interested to see what the FDE looks like, all my other semis are polymer/uncoated stainless or all stainless revolvers. Don
     
  10. william the great

    william the great

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    Southswede give it a rest.
     
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  11. March817

    March817

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    He (or she, you never know) has been resting nearly 2 years now.
     
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  12. Quigley150

    Quigley150

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    Don
    Dry fire it till the cows come home. Won’t hurt it. I’ve been a Smith Armorer for 20 years. You won’t damage anything in an M&P.
     
  13. DonD

    DonD

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    Funny that you should mention that. I don't think the owner's manual addresses dry firing. I've called S&W Customer Service a couple times and they say don't do it. The second time I called I mentioned that S&W Pro Shooter captain Julie Golob (or was at one time) was featured in Shooting USA endorsing dry firing. CS person said all she could say was don't do it.

    When I do dry fire I use quality snap caps. Don
     
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  14. happyguy

    happyguy Man, I'm Pretty

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    I broke a firing pin in an early 9c. Yes it was MIM but it indicates the striker is impacting the rear of the breach face rather forcefully.

    Regards,
    Happyguy :)
     
  15. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    I would not dry fire any striker fired gun excessively without snap caps. A few times now and then is probably fine.
     
  16. fastbolt

    fastbolt

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    The early 9/40c's used the original machined steel strikers. They started slip-streaming the revised and more durable MIM strikers into the M&P pistol line sometime in 2010, as I recall. My 40c was produced in an early 2010 LE production run and it came with the original machined striker.
     
  17. happyguy

    happyguy Man, I'm Pretty

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    Mine was MIM they replaced it with tool steel.

    Regards,
    Happyguy :)
     
  18. fastbolt

    fastbolt

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    I haven't done the 2.0 armorer class for the M&P's, but I've been through the regular M&P armorer class a few times, and the Shield class once. (By "regular" I mean for center-fire pistols chambered in 9, .40, .357 & .45, not the .22LR's.)

    In the last classes they gave armorers a component replacement interval list for the original M&P's and the Shields. While there is naturally a shorter recommended service inspection interval (another topic), the replacement interval for the striker assembly is listed as being every 10,000 rounds of live-fire for the regular M&P 9/.40 models, and every 20,000 rounds for the .45, or at every 30,000 dry-fire cycles (for all calibers). The Shield striker assembly replacement interval is every 10,000 rounds of live-fire (for all calibers), or after every 30,000 dry-fire cycles.

    I remember being told that the original M&P's had only been tested to something like 3500 dry-fire cycles when the line was first introduced with the machined steel strikers, since they didn't expect people would be dry-firing so much. Some of the heavy dry-fire done by some completion shooters apparently wasn't something initially considered for the pistols they were going to market under the Military & Police line. ;)

    However, the revised and more durable MIM strikers have been tested rather a lot during the last several years.

    FWIW, I've always been a bit reluctant to do excessive dry-fire with any striker firing pin pistol.

    Unlike pistols with tapered firing pins that just slide into and through the bolt (breech) face holes, some of the striker-type firing pin designs have larger and heavy heads, with flat frontal surfaces (from which the "pin" protrudes), and which "hammer" against the rear of the bolt (breech) face. (For that matter, so do some revolver firing pin designs, but those also involve hammers and that's another story.)

    Sure, the pin encountering a primer cup can help mitigate the stress better than dry-fire conditions (unless a properly designed snap-cap dummy is used).

    In my last couple of Glock recerts they've been telling armorers to use snap-caps if dry-fire was going to be done excessively, which has been mentioned by other armorers on GT from time to time.

    Just some thoughts.
     
  19. happyguy

    happyguy Man, I'm Pretty

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    My original MIM striker lasted about 100 live fires and 200 dry fires.

    Not that it matters since they don't make their strikers out of MIM anymore.

    I would still have it but it was the most inaccurate gun I have ever owned.

    Regards,
    Happyguy :)
     
  20. fastbolt

    fastbolt

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    Was your original one black/machined, or the revised "shiny" MIM?

    These are from my '08 production M&P 45. The black one is the early machined steel striker. You can easily see the machine markings. Note the recessed machined cut behind the head, which is coincidentally where some of the heads were reported to have broken off in the early guns.

    The plain stainless one is the revised .45 striker I ordered when I heard they'd been released. Heavier and more robust. Interestingly, it lacks the "shiny, polished" appearance of the 9/.40 striker assemblies, as well as the usual signs of MIM markings exhibited by the other stainless MIM strikers. (I ordered the new striker assembly for my 40c at the same time as for my 45, and it looks much different - but I didn't take any pics of that one.)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    For a while I wondered if I might've received some sort of "transitional" .45 striker, but I wasn't curious enough and never followed up on it. It's not like S&W hasn't continually revised their revisions at one time or another. ;) When I next asked in a subsequent class resert I was told (and saw in the classroom provided parts) that the then-current new stainless MIM strikers were shiny and looked like MIM parts.