Thoughts on storing guns in damp basement

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by Fear Night, Jan 22, 2010.

  1. Fear Night

    Fear Night NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    2,865
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Location:
    Sweet Home Alabama
    I'm buying a new house and down in the basement there is the perfect setup for a vault room. The room is about 15 feet long and 6 feet deep. Poured concrete walls all around and a steel cover up top (bottom of the front porch). All it needs is a vault door and I will have a walk in gun safe!

    I plan on framing the room up and putting in drywall, then mounting the guns on the wall. The dilemma I have is keeping the guns from being damaged. Do you think running a few Goldenrod dehumidifiers and keeping the guns well oiled would be sufficient? Or are there better solutions out there for preventing humidity in rooms?

    What about more heavy duty dehumidifiers like these:
    http://www.consumersearch.com/dehumidifier-reviews/frigidaire-fdf70s1
    Also, if it fails say during a power outage, how long until the guns would start forming rust? Hopefully at the fail point the room was already dehumidified; I can't imagine dangerous levels of humidity could start forming within a few hours anyway.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2010
  2. faawrenchbndr

    faawrenchbndr CLM

    Messages:
    39,831
    Likes Received:
    5,119
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    east of East St Louis
    I'd say it's a BAD idea,......but make the most of it.
    Dehumidifier, Gloden Rod in the safe, all weapons in GunSocks
     

  3. 1gewehr

    1gewehr

    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Location:
    Mid TN
    Why is it damp? Do the walls or ceiling leak? If so, that's a bigger problem than a bit of rust.
    If the walls and floor don't leak, then once you get the place dried out, it should be fine. Run a light fixture into your gun safe with a 60-watt bulb. That will do just as good a job of keeping humidity low as any commercial fixture.
     
  4. Scared_of_zombies

    Scared_of_zombies

    Messages:
    3,369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Use that basement paint that stops water leaks through the walls (cant remember the name).
     
  5. J.R. Bob Dobbs

    J.R. Bob Dobbs Nerd

    Messages:
    1,731
    Likes Received:
    338
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2000
    Location:
    McGaheysville, VA
    My basement used to get musty and moldy. I got a good-sized dehumidifier and the problem is gone, humidity stays around 35%. That's the whole basement (3 rooms). Piped the drain for the dehumidifier outside to eliminate having to pay any attention to it.

    A dehumidifier in your gun-room should be all you need. And, if they are stored PROPERLY oiled, they won't rust anyway.
     
  6. CSnakes

    CSnakes

    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2006
    Location:
    SC (finally!)
    All of the above, especially the de-humidifier.

    The paint is called dry-lock, it's not cheap, and it's messy, but your collection is worth it, I'm sure!

    Also plastic sheet over any exposed dirt (a'la crawlspace).

    Make sure all downspouts and drainage is set up properly to keep more water from coming in.

    All of the above will transform the space in terms of humidity.
     
  7. Fear Night

    Fear Night NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    2,865
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Location:
    Sweet Home Alabama
    It rained a lot yesterday morning and I had the home inspected yesterday afternoon. My home inspector saw no signs of leaks and said I should be fine putting up drywall inside. That room to me just had a more cool, humid feel than the rest of the basement.
     
  8. MARKDANIEL

    MARKDANIEL

    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Insulate the room and use a vapor barrier under your drywall.
     
  9. digitalmike47

    digitalmike47

    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Location:
    Virginia
    Use the green drywall that is used in bathrooms......
     
  10. slewfoot

    slewfoot Random Mayhem

    Messages:
    13,557
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Location:
    S.E. Pa
    Thoughts on storing guns in damp basement

    Don't..........
     
  11. ricklee4570

    ricklee4570

    Messages:
    1,846
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    I know this will probably draw some criticism, but I was in the same situation about 12 years ago. I oiled them down good with CLP and none of my Glocks ever showed any signs of rust. Nor did any of my other firearms. With proper treatment, even people who live on the beach in heavy salt water areas dont seem to have rust issues.

    I know of a fellow that is at sea a good amount of time, and he said that with proper care (disassembly and cleaning regularly) and with good Break-Free CLP applications, he never has any rust on his sidearm.
     
  12. farmer-dave

    farmer-dave

    Messages:
    1,220
    Likes Received:
    18
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    central Kansas
    I have a concrete safe room down in the basement, designed for tornado protection. Mine has a concrete roof ceiling which doubles as the front porch. No matter what a basement is always going to have some moisture. I'd forget the cost of a vault door, alot of times their more expensive then a gun safe. Put in a good steel door with a deadbolt and lock and buy a gun safe. I run a goldenrod in my safe and during the summer months I also run a dehumidifer in the room.
     
  13. dosei

    dosei

    Messages:
    3,171
    Likes Received:
    11
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Location:
    Upstate SC
    Put a Goldenrod or two in the safe & get a dehumidifier like the Frigidaire. If the room as a drain in it, or if it's the room where the sump pump is, then be sure to get a humidifier that can have a drain hose attached. That way you can run the hose to the drain or sump well and just let the dehumidifier work. A dehumidifier is a "must have" for any basement, whether you have guns stored there or not. It turns that "big damp place" into a big dry quiet space that is warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Also...before you begin putting up your stud wall...put up plastic. Heavy gauge plastic rolls can be found at Lowe's and should go up against the concrete wall. One easy way to do it is to, after constructing the stud wall on the floor, cover the stud wall in plastic and staple it in place. Then when you raise the stud wall up, the plastic side will be against the wall.
     
  14. farmer-dave

    farmer-dave

    Messages:
    1,220
    Likes Received:
    18
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    central Kansas
    Sounds like alot of work to sheetrock a gun room, especially if it has moisture issues. I'd just paint it and use that duralok paint. If you do sheetrock it I'd use that greenboard stuff. Moisture is tolerable but I hate mold. As long as you keep your guns oiled you'll never have rust issues. Perhaps that's why I prefer chromed bores and stainless guns, since all mine are kept in a basement.
     
  15. G23c

    G23c

    Messages:
    5,862
    Likes Received:
    1,469
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2009
    Location:
    houston, texas
    I'm with famer-dave, I like the idea of no sheetrock.
     
  16. Caver 60

    Caver 60

    Messages:
    7,031
    Likes Received:
    4,211
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest
    I have almost exactly the same setup, including the concrete ceiling. But I poured my own foundation and walls and ceiling when I built the house. Never had a drop of moisture in my basement, but I did everything correctly when I built it. Also have my furnace in my basement with a small duct into the 'tornado' shelter. Never had a gun or anything rust and I don't use a dehumidifier.

    But if the OP's basement isn't properly constructed he may have problems without a dehumidifier. I wouldn't sheetrock it either. Just more places to trap moisture.

    ETA That steel roof on the OP's safe room might be a contributing factor to it feeling humid???

    Second ETA: I also have a concrete floor in my 'tornado shelter.' I have constructed special wooden storage containers to store my guns in since they are already in a 'safe,' so to speak. In addition to a proper perimeter drain, I insulated the 10 inch concrete walls to grade level with proper styrofoam before back filling the ditch with 2 inch rock and then a dirt cover over the rock. Then I insulated the ceiling with pink styrofoam and insulated the interior walls with pink styrofoam sheets to well below grade level. Never had a problem in well over 20 years. And I'm on top of a hill, no danger of flood.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2010
  17. automan

    automan

    Messages:
    434
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Location:
    NVA
    Bad idea unless you store it in a plastic case with desiccant inside to absorb moisture.:whistling:
     
  18. das9mm26

    das9mm26

    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    DryLok (TM of UGL).....
    There ARE cheaper imitations.....caveat emptor!!
    But be ABSOLUTELY SURE the area STAYS DRY after applying 2-3 coats over as many days (let each coat dry THOROUGHLY!!!)
    As others have said....find the SOURCE of the moisture; is it coming through the walls/floor/vents/windows?? Unless you can get - and KEEP - the entire area REALLY DRY.....I'd be very hesitant to store firearms in that environment....Good luck!
     
  19. sawgrass

    sawgrass

    Messages:
    3,328
    Likes Received:
    34
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    April Aire (Research Products), makes a whole house dehumidifier. This may be an option.
    It will likely require a contractor to install, as they don't sell
    to the public.
     
  20. Three-Five-Seven

    Three-Five-Seven Señor Mombo Millennium Member

    Messages:
    2,778
    Likes Received:
    83
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 1999
    Location:
    Great Southwest
    I've actually stored guns in a basement. It worked out great -- until the basement flooded one winter while we were on vacation.

    As the result of my personal experience, I strongly recommend that you do not store guns in a basement. I learned the hard way that shizzle happens.