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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thinking outside the box.

I want to discuss thinking outside of the box.

There were 10 of us in the class. It was the end of a few days. We were taken out of sight of the exercise. One by one we were led into a box drawn on the range ground. Inside the box were a number of discarded items. At first glance, the spoken exercise was simply. Stay in the box. Not go outside the box. Draw and fire one shot on target at our own speed. The target was like a 4 inch square at 20 feet.

The instructor kept up a babble. As the student would draw the firearm, the instructor would ask questions about it and the student would stop. The instructor would examine the gun unload it and then toss it outside the box at some great distance. He would then roar “fire”. Two students passed. One asked for the instructor’s side arm and fired. The second student grabbed the instructor, put him between the student and the target, laughed, drew the instructor’s side arm and fired. I was the second student.

I would like to improve beyond the arguments about what is the best xyz or the cheapest xyz. I would appreciate your suggestions.

You have probably heard the old joke about the right way, the wrong way and the Marine way of doing things.

1. 30-60-90 days approach
You don’t have to have a specific emergency, but shtf. What happens around you with people over 30-60-90 days. You think about what unfolds in the first 30 days and how you deal with the challenges. Then you contemplate the next 30 days. You are not in the mode of having a list of equipment, describing how you “bug out” with a 40 pound pack, or arguing which gun is the “best”.

2. How to secure advantages in survival before shtf
How you prepare for shtf happening when you just happen to be at work, on the road, at a distant destination on vacation, at the relative’s home out of state. How you plan so that everyone in your family doesn’t have to run home, load up the car, and join the traffic jam.

I mention this as an example, not to show that I am “smart”. I was on vacation in rural Mississippi at a dance studio when the power to the area went off. I had the only flashlight (in my dance shoe bag). There was also an unused pocket knife.

3. What skills you will need and how you are acquiring them now.
It is tremendous challenge to find someone who can teach you animal tracking, man tracking, knife fighting, escrima fighting or precision shooting. If you are fortunate to fight a varmint hunting club in your area, you will learn more than the Saturday morning shooter on the 100 yard line about precision shooting for example.

4. How you improve your natural senses.
It isn’t the typical discussion about what is the cheapest or the best binoculars. Forget the old adage of “buy Steiners”. It is the reflection on who, what, when, where and how they will be used. I know that Force Recon people are trained in using binos. Ditto for USMC snipers. I also know how the better big game guides use them. When you understand concepts like looking in rays and tripods, you are way up the survival curve.

5. How do you “master” the night.
If you are old enough to remember Vietnam, you are old enough to remember the expression that the VC owned the night and the Americans owned the day. Why? The low tech Japanese dominated the fighting the Soviets in the 1920s and 1930s in night fighting until Soviets read the Japanese manual on how to train.

Mastering the night includes concepts like solar powered lights, flashlights, batteries, no tech training. How do you use unassisted vision in near total darkness?
:faint:
 

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RIP Stan Lee.. . .
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I'd be pissed if an instructor took my gun and threw it on the ground!!!!
 

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...1. 30-60-90 days approach
You don’t have to have a specific emergency, but shtf. What happens around you with people over 30-60-90 days. You think about what unfolds in the first 30 days and how you deal with the challenges. Then you contemplate the next 30 days.
Agreed, and imo the first 30 days are by far the most critical. Fact is, most "shtf situations" are much shorter than 30 days total, and over-emphasizing the Mad Max or Gunkid fantasies can hugely detract from the rational, real situations that warrant prepping for.


...
2. How to secure advantages in survival before shtf
How you prepare for shtf happening when you just happen to be at work, on the road, at a distant destination on vacation, at the relative’s home out of state. How you plan so that everyone in your family doesn’t have to run home, load up the car, and join the traffic jam.
I mention this as an example, not to show that I am “smart”. I was on vacation in rural Mississippi at a dance studio when the power to the area went off. I had the only flashlight (in my dance shoe bag). There was also an unused pocket knife.
Advantages come at the expense of convenience in my experience. Having the advantage of superior fitness or marksmanship comes at the cost of exercise, training & discipline; the advantage of a year's worth of groceries comes at the expense of postponed gratification in other areas. The advantage of actually having a gun in a gunfight, or having a flashlight when the lights go out, also comes at the expense of compromised convenience - being willing to actually carry a gun & flashlight every day. The advantage of having a tent when backpacking comes at the expense of actually toting that tent the 15 hours per day that you're not using it.

A person's level of advantage, at least beyond a certain level of genetic differences such as size or intelligence, are imo directly correlative to the level of their willingness to forego convenience.


...3. What skills you will need and how you are acquiring them now.
It is tremendous challenge to find someone who can teach you animal tracking, man tracking, knife fighting, escrima fighting or precision shooting.


...4. How you improve your natural senses.
It isn’t the typical discussion about what is the cheapest or the best binoculars. Forget the old adage of “buy Steiners”. It is the reflection on who, what, when, where and how they will be used...
Again, plus-1 on these as well. Fwiw, I recently did buy a pair of steiners and while they're better optically than my older, smaller, nikons, they're not as good as the compact nikons for some tasks; exactly as you say, because of the where & how they're being used in this case.


...5. How do you “master” the night.
If you are old enough to remember Vietnam, you are old enough to remember the expression that the VC owned the night and the Americans owned the day...
Old enough to remember it, but (fortunately) not old enough to have participated. Have a brother who did, and don't envy him that at all.
 
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