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There ain't crap out there

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by ithaca_deerslayer, Jan 31, 2003.

  1. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    I think virtually all the deer have moved down off my hill for the winter. There's about 3 feet of snow in the woods. I go back there all the time cross-country skiing. Mostly I just see rabbit and bobcat tracks. Lots of rabbits. Also might be red or gray fox, I forgot which one of the two doesn't leave claw prints.

    The owls are still active. Oh, also saw some turkey tracks. Some mice, too.

    But mostly it is all quiet.
     
  2. heyTJ

    heyTJ Giddy up!

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    I found your deer, their in my freaking back yard eating everything that is green.
    Their even eating black oil sunflower seeds.
    I need a silencer.
     

  3. m65swede

    m65swede

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    They might have moved a few hundred miles to the west! :) My bowhunting buddy observed and video'd nearly 150 deer on his and his neighbor's property last Friday.

    We have almost no snow on the ground here so the deer have an abundant food supply - corn and soybean fields, winter wheat, and mast in the woods. A few of the bucks have dropped their antlers already; its almost time to get out there to look for sheds.

    Swede
     
  4. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage YouTalkin'ToMe?

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    with snow that deep, they are "yarding up" somwhere...they simply cannot get around in that deep of snow so they herd up in a semi-protected area that might not recieve as much snow because of the trees or lay out of the land or whatever.
     
  5. TriggerTripper

    TriggerTripper

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    The deer situacion is bad here out west (Utah & Idaho) Our muley numbers are way down, and not improving. The moutain lion population is way up, but fish and game department fail to see a connection...add to that our poor drought conditions and the deer just can't get a break...
     
  6. Grumpy Gardener

    Grumpy Gardener

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    aye. But the bear are moving within the last 2 wks. We did a SAR here and I counted at least 4 different series of tracks in less then a 1/4 mile. All moving the same direction.

    Might have slowed down now it's gotten a bit colder in the last wk.

    gardener

    p.s. did catch some muley doe and fawns tracks about 3 wks ago near the river too.

    gg.
     
  7. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    ithaca, look for a low lying area with heavy conifer cover... especially cedar swamps. The terrain where you're at is likely similar to my area, and deer are deer, no matter where they live. When the snow gets deep, they yard up, as Brian Damage said. Their metabolism goes way down, and they keep movement to a bare minimum to save energy. If they can find a cedar swamp type of environment, they flock to it from miles around. It provides them with food and shelter from the wind, and they don't leave the area until spring. I come across these areas frequently, when out riding the snowmobile trails. You can ride for miles and miles, and not see a single track... but if the trail goes through a yarding area, you cannot find a single square foot without a deer track in the snow. There's one such spot not far from home, where I've seen literally hundreds of deer in just a few acres of cedar trees. Come springtime, you can see where the deer have been feeding, as all the branches are bare up to a certain height, depending on how deep the snow cover, and whether it was compacted enough to support a deer's weight. The younger deer die first in a really bad winter, because all the browse within their reach is depleted by the larger deer... who survive because they can reach higher up in the trees to feed.
     
  8. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    Nope, just don't have that near me. I have a bunch of small pines, but they aren't in that either. Instead, I think they actually just moved off my hill.
     
  9. nyredneck

    nyredneck كا&

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    The grey fox has retractable claws, the red doesn't. also the red fox's paw prints are much bigger.;f