The Magic/Silent E in English

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by OV1kenobi, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. OV1kenobi

    OV1kenobi

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    My English surname “Lane” is a basic example of the British magic/silent “E.”

    Things get especially complicated in the written English language; particularly with all of the spelling rules and exceptions.

    Double consonants of the same two letters between two vowels are among my favorites.


    View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AKPdUp0w-q8


    Learning to speak and even read fluently in English is one thing; writing fluently in English is a skill unto itself.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2020
  2. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    At one time scribes got paid by the letter. It affected the way spelling evolved. Trying to develop spellings for very similar words caused the use of double and silent letters.
     

  3. OV1kenobi

    OV1kenobi

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    With that in mind, it would appear that English emanuances were especially mercenary!
     
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  4. shoeguns

    shoeguns Shooting Star

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    I English language has evolved over the years, not so bad though but now.... The millennials are taking it for a joyride and destroying it.
     
  5. Deltic

    Deltic

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    OK now try to explain Irish spelling. :crazy:
     
  6. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    Alcohol and a wicked sense of humor.
     
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  7. JohnBT

    JohnBT NRA Benefactor

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    I always figured Irish spelling was to confuse the English during their numerous invasions and occupations. Although it doesn't take much to confuse the English apparently.

    Then there's Wales.

    "The village is also known as Llanfair PG or Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch. The name means "St Mary's church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the fierce whirlpool of St Tysilio of the red cave" in Welsh."
     
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  8. Critch

    Critch

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    A lot of it has to do with our language being a mixture of Anglo-Saxon, Frisien and Norman French. There is a small amount of Celtic, but very little.
     
  9. Doc Holliday

    Doc Holliday CLM

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    Try Russian, the sentence structure alone will make ya crazy...

    The Russian alphabet consists of 33 letters divided into 10 vowels, 21 consonants and 2 letters which do not designate any sounds.