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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been researching buying a new rifle to replace an old Savage 110 and I stumbled upon this video about how Sako and Tikka rifles are made. I never knew how much longer a hammer forged barrel is after the process is complete. Pretty cool!

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Am I missing something? Is there suppose to be a video in your post? Looking at the barrels in the picture I don't see how one can be hammered into the other.
ETA, maybe it's an optical illusion but both barrels in the picture look to be the same thickness.
Sorry, I did mean to share the link as an afterthought but I forgot. In other words, I was originally just going to post the pick, but then I changed the wording to share a video and, like a bonehead, I forgot!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Man, they must really pound that barrel hard and for a long time to get it a third longer. It must relieve a lot of the stress from that piece of steel, just as the guy from Beretta/Sako/Tikka explained. He also said they reheat it afterwards for a couple of hours to finish the stress release process. Did they say if that was a cold hammer process? Are they all cold hammered?
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Pounding the heck out of a piece of steel DOES NOT relieve the stress but instead added the stress - good kind of stress. Yes, it’s cold hammer forged because hot hammer forge doesn’t put that kind of good mechanical stress to the steel.

Of course once it’s heat treated, that stress goes away, so that claim of hammer forging is better than button broached rifling or cut rifling is full of you know what. It’s called good advertisement.
You're right. I apologize and stand corrected. The Sako/Tikka engineer said hammering increases the stress before it's relieved with heating. Thank you.

That said, I would think the most stress would be before hammering as the hammering would compress the steel and make sure the density is more uniform and thus more stable (so the barrel would be more rigid and better remain symmetrical). The other representative said something like "some people claim hammering creates more stress" which is what the engineer was responding to. Maybe it's a contentious issue for the reason I pointed out and that the heating is just to relieve additional stress. In my mind that's what seems logical. In other words, the hammered barrel would be more uniform in its density and then become even more so with heating. Otherwise, why hammer it at all? They could just heat it. It's all about making sure the barrel stays symmetrical, right? I find that engineers often just repeat what they're taught and fill in the blanks when they're not necessarily sure. I also think even the experts don't agree.
 
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