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Interestingly enough, there are only two accounts of that first Thanksgiving with the Indians, so if you've ever heard conflicting reports about what it was like (or what Thanksgiving was all about), here are the only primary accounts from Mayflowerhistory.com. Draw your own conclusions, especially pertaining to my final point):

"There are only two contemporary accounts of the 1621 Thanksgiving: First is Edward Winslow's account, which he wrote in a letter dated December 12, 1621. The complete letter was first published in 1622.

"'Our corn [i.e. wheat] did prove well, and God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our peas not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown. They came up very well, and blossomed, but the sun parched them in the blossom. Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.'

"The second description was written about twenty years after the fact by [Governor] William Bradford in his History Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford's History was rediscovered in 1854 after having been taken by British looters during the Revolutionary War. Its discovery prompted a greater American interest in the history of the Pilgrims. It is also in this account that the Thanksgiving turkey tradition is founded.

"They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercising in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports."

Another historical fact is that George Bush and I share a great grandfather, William Brewster, who eldest voyager who set sail on the Mayflower for its initial crossing in 1620 and who participated in the first thanksgiving in 2021. He was also an advisor to Governor William Bradford. Unknown to most people today, Brewster handed down a prediction through my family that holds a great deal of weight to many of us today. As discussed with the indians and others this day four hundred years ago, William prognosticated that the point forty smith and wesson would make a mighty comeback in the 2020s.

With subsonic loads for bullets weighing up to 205 grains, lighter rounds that can exceed 500 ft. lbs. of energy, polymer technology, and all the data collected in the Buckeye Firearms Association study, I think he may have been right.

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!-william-brewster-jpeg
Forehead Nose Hair Eyebrow Eye


HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
 

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Any relation to Caleb Brewster (the revolutionary war spy and hero)?

It must be amazing to trace your roots back so far.

I started including popcorn in my Thanksgiving celebrations since it is sometimes said it was likely part of the original celebration.
 
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What Winslow wrote (checked with more than 1 source)

"'Our corn [i.e. wheat] did prove well, and God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our peas not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown. They came up very well, and blossomed, but the sun parched them in the blossom. Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.'

What the press is circulating today:

Myth: The Pilgrims and Wampanoags came together in November 1621 for a Thanksgiving feast.


Edward Winslow, in his writing about the first few years in Plymouth titled “Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims in Plymouth,” does mention a celebration marking the settlement’s first successful harvest, probably held around October 1621. Given the context, it certainly wasn’t a huge deal but it would later become one in modern America.

According to Winslow, despite the fact that the Wampanoags had allowed the Pilgrims to live on their land, provided them with aid and taught them how to successfully grow native crops, the Wampanoags were not invited to this celebration. They arrived only after the Pilgrims started shooting their guns into the air. Believing themselves to be under attack, the Wampanoags head sachem, Massasoit, showed up at the settlement with about 90 warriors expecting war. Instead, they found a celebration and they decided to stay, with their hunters bringing in five deer as a contribution. Rather than a happy celebration of camaraderie and partnership, the feast that would serve as the basis of the traditional Thanksgiving myth was actually quite a tense affair, fraught with political implications.
 

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What Winslow wrote (checked with more than 1 source)

"'Our corn [i.e. wheat] did prove well, and God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our peas not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown. They came up very well, and blossomed, but the sun parched them in the blossom. Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.'

What the press is circulating today:

Myth: The Pilgrims and Wampanoags came together in November 1621 for a Thanksgiving feast.


Edward Winslow, in his writing about the first few years in Plymouth titled “Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims in Plymouth,” does mention a celebration marking the settlement’s first successful harvest, probably held around October 1621. Given the context, it certainly wasn’t a huge deal but it would later become one in modern America.

According to Winslow, despite the fact that the Wampanoags had allowed the Pilgrims to live on their land, provided them with aid and taught them how to successfully grow native crops, the Wampanoags were not invited to this celebration. They arrived only after the Pilgrims started shooting their guns into the air. Believing themselves to be under attack, the Wampanoags head sachem, Massasoit, showed up at the settlement with about 90 warriors expecting war. Instead, they found a celebration and they decided to stay, with their hunters bringing in five deer as a contribution. Rather than a happy celebration of camaraderie and partnership, the feast that would serve as the basis of the traditional Thanksgiving myth was actually quite a tense affair, fraught with political implications.
I believe in the original accounts as depicted by Winslow. Which I suppose makes it all the more tragic.
 

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Bosh.

The first Thanksgiving was when Spaniards sat down with Native Americans in San Augustin in Florida in 1565.

The second Thanksgiving was when Spaniards sat down with Native Americans at what is now El Paso del Norte in 1598.

The English got around to it eventually.
 

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When Rush Limbaugh wrote his first Kids book on the First Thanksgiving I bought it for my grandkids. I am sure it contradicted what they heard in school…
 

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Interestingly enough, there are only two accounts of that first Thanksgiving with the Indians, so if you've ever heard conflicting reports about what it was like (or what Thanksgiving was all about), here are the only primary accounts from Mayflowerhistory.com. Draw your own conclusions, especially pertaining to my final point):

"There are only two contemporary accounts of the 1621 Thanksgiving: First is Edward Winslow's account, which he wrote in a letter dated December 12, 1621. The complete letter was first published in 1622.

"'Our corn [i.e. wheat] did prove well, and God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our peas not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown. They came up very well, and blossomed, but the sun parched them in the blossom. Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.'

"The second description was written about twenty years after the fact by [Governor] William Bradford in his History Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford's History was rediscovered in 1854 after having been taken by British looters during the Revolutionary War. Its discovery prompted a greater American interest in the history of the Pilgrims. It is also in this account that the Thanksgiving turkey tradition is founded.

"They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercising in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports."

Another historical fact is that George Bush and I share a great grandfather, William Brewster, who eldest voyager who set sail on the Mayflower for its initial crossing in 1620 and who participated in the first thanksgiving in 2021. He was also an advisor to Governor William Bradford. Unknown to most people today, Brewster handed down a prediction through my family that holds a great deal of weight to many of us today. As discussed with the indians and others this day four hundred years ago, William prognosticated that the point forty smith and wesson would make a mighty comeback in the 2020s.

With subsonic loads for bullets weighing up to 205 grains, lighter rounds that can exceed 500 ft. lbs. of energy, polymer technology, and all the data collected in the Buckeye Firearms Association study, I think he may have been right.

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!-william-brewster-jpeg
View attachment 1003968

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
And this post has nothing to with with firearms until the last sentence which has nothing to do with anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
And this post has nothing to with with firearms until the last sentence which has nothing to do with anything.
Lighten up and have a sense of humor
 

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I believe in the original accounts as depicted by Winslow. Which I suppose makes it all the more tragic.
The interesting thing is, what Winslow wrote is exactly what the schools taught me and the cartoons showed me back in the '70s. Now the left is so desperate to re-write history and tell me that's not true, they are making up an alternate version from thin air.
 

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My family came in 1634 on ship Elizabeth, from a displaced Yankee living in the south, I miss home and I hope to one day reclaim it from the occupiers. Happy thanksgiving!
You got me by a year, my family came over in 1635.

As for the "Displaced Yankee", do you know the difference between a Yankee, and Damn Yankee, and a God Damn Yankee?
 
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I would be happy to know. Tell me!

A Yankee is a person who lives up north.

A Damn Yankee is a person who lives up north and comes to the south for a visit.

A God Damn Yankee is a person who lives up north and comes to the south and stays.
 
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That would be me!
A Yankee is a person who lives up north.

A Damn Yankee is a person who lives up north and comes to the south for a visit.

A God Damn Yankee is a person who lives up north and comes to the south and stays.
That would be me! I’m technically a damn Yankee, because I don’t plan to be here too much longer. I’ve been here two years now though, so maybe I did cross over to the God Damn Yankee category.
 

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That would be me!


That would be me! I’m technically a damn Yankee, because I don’t plan to be here too much longer. I’ve been here two years now though, so maybe I did cross over to the God Damn Yankee category.

I grew up in Minnesota, The Army sent me to the south and I have stayed ever since. So I'm a God Damn Yankee too.
 
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