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The East Coast, Sales & Trust

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by M&P15T, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. M&P15T

    M&P15T Beard One

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    For you East Coast (NoVa, DC, NYC etc.) dwellers, I have some questions I'd like to ask.

    I'm a kitchen designer, and I moved to the NoVa area about 18 months ago. I've been resonably successful, but I'm always looking for fresh ideas and sales techniques. One HUGE difference between selling in this area, and the Midwest, is customer trust issues.

    I have been noticing that here in NoVa, when I meet with new perspective clients, I'm starting off within a general atmosphere of distrust. In the Midwest, trust wasn't a major issue to overcome. Selling there meant starting with a normal level of trust between you and the perspective client, and you had to screw up to lose the customer's trust. Here, it is painfully obvious that I have to earn my customer's trust, or buld up a level of trust.

    I understand why, as many people that I meet with have impressive and awful tales of getting ripped-off by one type of company or another in the past. So people here have an automatic level of distrust whenever they meet with a sales person such as myself.

    My company is A++ with the BBB. It is very Midwest like in how we take care of our customers. But due to the very nature of selling intangibles (which is the hardest type of sales), trust (or lack thereof) is a very important hurdle to overcome. I'm searching for thoughts and ideas on how to establish trust with perspective clients that have been burned themselves, or know others that have.

    I obviously discuss our BBB rating (which we safegard with awesome serivce), and explain how we're family owned, how our projects are done with dedicated subs and an awesome, production line like system. But that doesn't seem to be enough to over-come some people's natural distrust.

    Any thoughts or ideas? If you were looking for a designer (that's me), and their company to design & remodel your kitchen or bathroom, what would make you trust both the designer and the company enough to do business with them?

    I have great pics of my and other designers jobs I show to perspective clients. I have 6 different lines of cabinets, we are our own fabricators for our c-tops, virtually everything materials and labor wise is handeled in house by a great team that organizes and schedules our clients projects. And of course I share this with new perspective clients, but it still doesn't seem to be enough to overcome the fear folks have that they're going to get burned, because it's happened to them before. I swear when I share these positive attributes, I can see perspective new clients rolling their eyes and thinking to themselves "Yeah, I've heard THAT before".

    Any thoughts are appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012
  2. KalashniKEV

    KalashniKEV

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    Maybe tell them you have almost 5K posts on Glocktalk.com?

    :)
     

  3. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    I'd start by throwing their laundry on the floor.
     
  4. ChuteTheMall

    ChuteTheMall Witless Protection Program

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    Deep community roots, not some yankee carpetbaggers who have only been down here in Virginia for less than 150 years; somebody who stood with us against the Crown.
     
  5. gigab1te

    gigab1te

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    References from satisfied customers are probably the best thing you can do, although nowadays most people are probably not going to agree to have their name and number given out to strangers. I still get calls a few times a year from prospective customers of some contractors who did work for me over the years, and I'm happy to talk to them. I've even let one come in and look at the remodel work that I had done.