The coup plotters lies continue to unravel...

Discussion in 'Political Issues' started by Burebista, Aug 15, 2020.

  1. Burebista

    Burebista Enlightened Tyrant

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    Catherine Herridge
    @CBS_Herridge

    #Durham In Clinesmith docs page 1, Durham says FBI opened a “Foreign Agents Registration Act” case called “Crossfire Hurricane,” July 31, 2016.

    FARA is criminal. But when Comey disclosed the probe’s existence in 2017, he emphasized its “counter-intelligence” nature to gather info.



    FARA case = criminal investigation = FBI needed probable cause to investigate Flynn and others in the Trump campaign in Crossfire Hurricane.

    But they couldn't find any probable cause, so sometime in 2016-2017 they decided to turn Crossfire Hurricane into an "intelligence" operation which gave them more latitude to spy on the campaign without being encumbered by legal barriers.

    Comey lied about this to Congress. He emphatically stated Crossfire Hurricane was always an intelligence op, when in fact it started as a criminal FARA investigation.
     
  2. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    Typically, the feds were not criminally prosecuting people at the time for simply failing to register. (Tax evasion was something else). People who should have registered were allowed to do so.

    When you consider matters like staff structure, procedures (the boring stuff) and workloads, someone in management received a presentation from a subordinate on opening a FARA case investigation. Management approved the opening of the case. It did not have to go up to the Director for approval.

    Now you have a case opened and an FBI lawyer altering records and deliberately leaving out information. That individual had to deal with the staff structure which had to review and approve applications for secret court warrants. So, the question becomes whether management deliberately or negligently failed to do the necessary reviews before signing off on secret court warrant applications. This is where the plea bargain and proffer sessions become important.
     
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  3. DaleGribble

    DaleGribble Liberals 'R Bad!!!!

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    Your basic premise on this is wrong. No law enforcement agency in America needs probable cause to investigate a potential crime. They need probable cause to obtain things like warrants and make arrests, but not to initiate or conduct an investigation.
     
  4. ModGlock17

    ModGlock17

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    That will be the test on definition of "unreasonable searches and seizures" probably up to scotus.

    To investigate, you have to do searches. In old times, searches are on papers and hard evidence. Today, those info are electronic.

    Patriots act bypasses that 4th Admendment. If it wasn't necessary to bypass "unreasonable searches" and Probable Cause then there'd no need for Patriots act. Therefore, the existence of patriots act affirms the ideal of the 4th, against the widely held belief that no probable cause is necessary.

    So what we have here, is written legislation vs. widely held beliefs. Guess SCOTUS has to decide, huh ?
     
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  5. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    You are correct, but an investigation requires actions and we have been told this investigation involves warrants. Also, even steps that don't require PC may be criminal if initiated for the wrong reason. I recall from a class I recently taught, that even giving a press conference about a case can be a civil rights violation if done with an improper motive, for example.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2020
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  6. nevernuffglock

    nevernuffglock

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    Roger Stone had a morning raid and cnn show up at his house for supposedly the same thing.
     
  7. DaleGribble

    DaleGribble Liberals 'R Bad!!!!

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    Yeah, when they lied about their PC to obtain warrants there is a big problem but if the feebs found real evidence of a crime during intelligence gathering there's no issue. It really doesn't matter if PC was found in an investigation or during intelligence gathering. Hell, you could be doing something as innocuous as eating breakfast, oblivious to the world and PC of a crime could fall in your lap, it would still be valid.

    The fact that the feebs already admitted that they didn't have enough PC in 2 of the 4 Page warrants is the real problem. They used those warrants to spy on Page. I could care less what they called the action of spying, that's just semantics. It was wrong no matter what you call it.

    Horowitz said it best...

    "We do not have confidence that the FBI has executed its Woods Procedures in compliance with FBI policy, or that the process is working as it was intended to help achieve the 'scrupulously accurate' standard for FISA applications," Horowitz wrote in a memo to FBI Director Christopher Wray.

    When they went to entrap Flynn did it matter if it was for an investigation or intelligence-gathering purposes when the whole point was to try and get him to lie? I personally don't think so. It was wrong regardless.
     
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