Glock Talk banner

Tennifer misinformation

9148 26
i have been looking at many gen 5 glock reviews in print and video format. Many talk about the nDLC coating replacing tennifer....

Tennifer was a metal theatment that went into metal before any finish was applied ... stopped being used years ago due to environmental reasons. It's job was to prevent wear and corrosion on pistols even when the finish was worn off...

Tennifer was not something you could see on a finished glock pistol. It was under the metal finish glock used.

So when you watch a video or read a story about the new finish replacing tennifer ... it's just not factual.. the recent glock finishes have been poor quality , so I hope the new gen 5 glock finish holds up well in the long run. It seems like glock made a positive change in this case.
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

· Lean & Mean
Joined
·
16,625 Posts
Gaseous ferritic nitrocarburizing process. Tennifer & Melonite are just different brand names for the same chemical process. Whatever they call it now...doesn't really matter. What I'm hoping for is that Glock will eventually settle on the quality outer most layer of the finish, similar to the one present on the older Gen3 pistols and commonly referred to as "frying pan" finish.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
6,834 Posts
Glock in Austria used a salt-bath (not gaseous) ferritic nitrocarburizing process that was propietary to Durferrit GmbH in Mannheim Germany. The identical process was called by several trademark names...but NEVER was the process called tennifer, tinifer, tanifor, tenafer, or tenefer or any other of the imaginative BS names that people on gun forums like to just make up in lieu of troubling themselves to learn the horribly complex correct name. :) The process was often trademarked as TENIFER in German-speaking countries.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,829 Posts
I'd sure like to know what the frying pan finish was on the Gen 3 guns. That stuff wears like iron. My 9 year old G19 barely shows any wear at all and it been shot and carried regularly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Here, Here, some one who understands that Tennifer was never a finish but a metal treatment before any treatment was applied. This is probably the biggest fallacy in all of Glock history. Now whatever they put in the Eggshell finish pot that is the true mystery as it wears great, doesn't scratch, may get a shiny area but that is about it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
"Gaseous ferritic nitrocarburizing process. Tennifer & Melonite are just different brand names for the same chemical process. Whatever they call it now...doesn't really matter. What I'm hoping for is that Glock will eventually settle on the quality outer most layer of the finish, similar to the one present on the older Gen3 pistols and commonly referred to as "frying pan" finish."

Thanks, that's what I thought. Both my Gen 3s have a grayish finish that looks like parkerizing. It does show holster wear but I like it.
 

· Lean & Mean
Joined
·
16,625 Posts
"Gaseous ferritic nitrocarburizing process. Tennifer & Melonite are just different brand names for the same chemical process. Whatever they call it now...doesn't really matter. What I'm hoping for is that Glock will eventually settle on the quality outer most layer of the finish, similar to the one present on the older Gen3 pistols and commonly referred to as "frying pan" finish."

Thanks, that's what I thought. Both my Gen 3s have a grayish finish that looks like parkerizing. It does show holster wear but I like it.
Yeah, I'm well familiar with it. Wear shows much quicker, but on the positive side it's very "grippy".
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,908 Posts
As noted, in Europe (Austria) Glock used Hef Durferrit's nitrocarburizing process that was sold as Tenifer there. They use other names for the process, including Melonite (the brand name it is sold under in the U.S., see note below for exact quote from Hef Durferrit regarding this).

It is not banned by the EPA (car and racing parts are hardened by this process all the time, and the USEPA even has a web page describing the hazardous byproducts and handling, so don't be swayed by assertions it is prohibited here, because it is not!).

Glock stopped putting the Tenifer name on their U.S. marketing literature, and we don't know if it was because they were making guns in the U.S. (which would not be able to use that brand name, even if the formula was identical), or if they simply chose to do the equivalent of buying facial tissues because Kleenex cost $12 more per gun, and the hardening process was essentially the same.

The new finish (nDLC, RunDMC, or whatever) looks promising, and to be a return to the frying pan finish I prefer, but underneath it, Glock is doing some form of metal hardening, and it is surely a variation of the long-established nitrocarburizing process, whether brand-name, generic, bath, spray, etc.

source: Hef-Durferrit USA web site, http://www.hefusa.net/_pdfs/Tufftride-QPQ-Process.pdf

"The TUFFTRIDE® process is known in English-speaking and Asian countries under that name, in Europe and German-speaking countries as TENIFER® and in the USA as MELONITE®.

TUFFTRIDE®, QPQ®, TENIFER®and MELONITE® are registered trademarks of Durferrit GmbH."



.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Tennifer, Melonite, Nitride, Nitrocarburization are all basically the same thing, a case hardening process that penetrates and imbues the outer layer of steel with carbides and nitrides; they are very hard and corrosion resistant. The color of steel doesn't change much, it is like a dull grey. The nitrided steel can be parkerized or blued or similarly darkened for the final look. Even if the bluing wears, the nitride layer remains and the steel is still hard and corrosion resistant.

DLC is diamond like carbon, which is essentially a layer of carbides or similar compounds plated on the surface of the steel. This finish is just as hard and basically as corrosion resistant as nitriding, however if the DLC surface layer is breeched, bare steel can be exposed to corrosion.

If Glock switched entirely to DLC, it wouldn't necessarily be a worse finish, it is just as good as nitrocarburizing, assuming the layer doesn't flake or chip.

However, if Glock's DLC is added on top of the old Tennifer (nitrocarburizing), then the new Glocks have the ultimate finish, even if the DLC flakes in some areas, the now exposed nitrocarburized layer would still prevent corrosion and wear.
 

· I feel pretty.
Joined
·
7,363 Posts
The gas melonite isn't as deep or hard as the bath melonite treatments. But it is more EPA compliant.

Also keep in mind, that it doesn't matter if the EPA's book says Tenifer is still ok for use. None of the US regulatory people read the rules or follow them. (None of the code inspectors at hospitals or retirement home follow modern code books. NONE of them. They don't even have a copy of the laws.) If the EPA is putting pressure on Glock to use a gas melonite process, not a bath. There's not much Glock can do.

I haven't seen any evidence of any finish over the melonite on g4 Glocks. I doubt the g5's are any different. I'll wait and see.

If there is a difference between G4 and G5, I would guess it's the time spent in the melonite process, or metal finish before the process.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
I thought the Gen 4 had the "fry pan" finish....?????
All BS aside, I want to see it typed by someone that is associated with Glock, is an advanced (If that exists) Glock Armorer, or that knows more about Glocks than Gaston himself;
1) Does Glock still make Gen 3 firearms?
2) If they do, is it most likely going to be the Gen 4 finish?
I want to give Glock another chance. I want to buy a G23, be it the "OLD" Gen 3, (If that's possible) or a Gen 4, if I must.
If I have to, I will buy a LE trade in G23 and have MIDDLEBRANCH MACHINE (https://www.facebook.com/MiddlebranchMachine/) refinish the slide. They do EXCELLENT work!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,965 Posts
The gas melonite isn't as deep or hard as the bath melonite treatments. But it is more EPA compliant.

Also keep in mind, that it doesn't matter if the EPA's book says Tenifer is still ok for use. None of the US regulatory people read the rules or follow them. (None of the code inspectors at hospitals or retirement home follow modern code books. NONE of them. They don't even have a copy of the laws.) If the EPA is putting pressure on Glock to use a gas melonite process, not a bath. There's not much Glock can do.

I haven't seen any evidence of any finish over the melonite on g4 Glocks. I doubt the g5's are any different. I'll wait and see.

If there is a difference between G4 and G5, I would guess it's the time spent in the melonite process, or metal finish before the process.
The EPA still has nothing to do with Tenifer. Salt bath nitriding is alive and well in the U.S. especially in the form of Melonite. I've got a LWD stainless that I had melonited and I've been using it for the last year in competition. No surface finish was applied, just the black resulting from the melonite. Still looks new with little wear. Tenifer has never been a process used in the U.S.. Melonite salt bath nitriding has been and still is.
 

· I feel pretty.
Joined
·
7,363 Posts
The EPA still has nothing to do with Tenifer. Salt bath nitriding is alive and well in the U.S. especially in the form of Melonite. I've got a LWD stainless that I had melonited and I've been using it for the last year in competition. No surface finish was applied, just the black resulting from the melonite. Still looks new with little wear. Tenifer has never been a process used in the U.S.. Melonite salt bath nitriding has been and still is.
You just said that the Glock factory doesn't have EPA type inspections at it's factories?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,965 Posts
You just said that the Glock factory doesn't have EPA type inspections at it's factories?
What? The EPA has no jurisdiction in Europe as to what process Glock uses as metal treatment. I said that Tenifer has never been a process used in the U.S. I said that salt bath nitriding is used in the U.S. all the time, Melonite in particular. I said that the EPA has never had anything to do with whether or not Glock uses Tenifer. Setting up an in house salt bath nitriding process such as Melonite could be done in the U.S., it will just cost more.
 

· Have Gun Will Travel
Joined
·
3,464 Posts
Follow the money. Glock is a for profit company and will do whatever it feels is in the best interest of the company whether it be MIM parts or metal finishes.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Black Nitride (aka, Tennifer/Melonite/QPQ) is all the same thing.

It's a Hi-Temp Pickling bath (1,050 degrees) that produces a "hardness" or heat treatment INTO the metal (like .0004-.0006" deep).

Then they put the parts into a "Black Oxide" bath (which is just like Gun Bluing but it's Black). This is to darken the color from the heat treatment which is a gray.

Contrary to what we have been told, the EPA has not banned it.

A couple of years ago, I saw for the 1st time, a Glock slide rust! It was on a Gen 4 G27 Carry Gun. Near the cocking serrations you can see some faint pitting:
Firearm Gun Trigger Starting pistol Gun accessory
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top