Tennessee Gun Permits up 23%

Discussion in 'Carry Issues' started by A6Gator, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. A6Gator

    A6Gator

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    Tennessee Gun Permits up 23%

    http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2010/feb/21/tenn-gun-permits-up-23/

    NASHVILLE — The number of Tennesseans licensed by the state to go armed increased by nearly 51,000 people last year — to 268,711, according to new state statistics.

    That's an increase of 23 percent over the 218,004 Tennesseans with handgun-carry permits on Jan. 1, 2009. By comparison, the 2008 increase was 14 percent, according to Tennessee Department of Safety figures.

    In Shelby County, the number of residents with handgun-carry permits jumped by 5,205 in 2009 to 38,130, up 16 percent. The Shelby County increase in 2008 was 15 percent.

    The new data indicate that about 6 percent of Tennessee residents old enough to have a handgun-carry permit -- those ages 21 and up -- had one at the start of this year.

    The permit rate is a little lower among people with Memphis addresses. The 20,716 people in the city with gun permits account for about two out of every 50 Memphis residents 21 and up, or nearly 5 percent.

    Knoxville has the highest concentration of permit-holders among the state's largest cities: More than 11 percent of its residents 21 and up are licensed to carry firearms.

    The new statistics come as the state legislature gears for another round of bills to expand the places where permittees may legally carry their guns, make it easier to get permits and close off public access to names of permit holders.

    Lawmakers will try to resurrect the law they approved last year allowing permit holders to take guns into restaurants and other places serving alcohol, which a court struck down in November as unconstitutionally vague.

    There also are bills to allow permit holders to take their guns onto school and employee parking lots, if they are left in their cars. A House subcommittee is set to review several of the bills March 10.

    The dramatic increase last year likely reflects a combination of factors, including wide publicity about the permit program and about legislative action in 2009 that allowed guns in bars and parks, said Richard Janikowski, associate professor of the University of Memphis Center for Community Criminology & Research.

    The publicity barrage began a year ago when a dispute between two Memphis men over how close their SUVs were parked outside a Cordova restaurant led to the shooting death of one of them in front of his children.

    "There's been so much publicity about the legislative changes, about being able to carry guns in bars and parks. I think often that kind of publicity generates a reaction -- like, 'Well if that's what the legislature says, maybe I should go get a permit,'" Janikowski said Friday.

    The 24-hour news cycle, often filled with crime stories, also has affected perceptions of the problem, he said.

    "People begin to feel they are constantly surrounded by crime no matter where they live. So I think we have this self-reinforcing cycle even though crime rates have been going down," Janikowski said.

    Violent crime in Memphis declined 9 percent from 2008 to 2009 and by about 15 percent since 2006, he said.

    There were also national news reports of people buying guns out of fear that Democrats who took control of the White House and Congress would move to tighten gun controls, which has not occurred.

    "We saw some of that occur prior to the assault weapons ban several years ago," Janikowski said.

    Eric Kehn of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives' Nashville field office said ATF does not track gun sales in the state.

    Tennessee's handgun-carry permit program has evolved over the past 15 years, partly as a result of a nationwide push by the National Rifle Association to streamline laws. Until the late 1990s when lawmakers switched the program to the state Department of Safety, permits were issued by county sheriffs.

    Applicants must complete a handgun-safety course, provide proof of U.S. citizenship or legal permanent residency and present a photo identification. The $115 permits must be renewed every four years, but no further training is required beyond that mandated for initial licensure.

    Tennessee Handgun-carry permits

    — Number of permits in Tennessee on Jan. 1, 2010: 268,711, up from 218,004 on Jan. 1, 2009, and 191,208 on Jan. 1, 2008

    — Total number of permits issued by Tennessee in 2009: 111,469. Of those, 59,413 were new original permits, 51,467 were renewals, and 589 were to new residents with permits from other states allowed under state law to renew in Tennessee.

    — Statewide, total issuance of permits (including renewals) nearly doubled from 57,172 in 2008 to 111,469 last year, a 95 percent increase..

    — Shelby County has 38,130 permit holders, up from 32,925 a year earlier.

    — Knox County ranks second with 17,249, up from 13,267.

    — Davidson County is third with 17,220, up from 14,325.

    — Hamilton county is fourth with 11,127, up from 9,258.
     
  2. ked

    ked

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    I feel safer already!:supergrin:

    ked:wavey:
     

  3. Bob45

    Bob45

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    What was the outcome of the law allowing carry in bars?
     
  4. A6Gator

    A6Gator

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    A TN chancellor decided that the law was "vague," so she overturned it. While I'm not sure why it was vague, some bar/restaurant owners got their collective panties in a twist and judge shopped until they found her. Anyway, the same majority that passed it in the legislature last year have said that they'll make the statute more clear. The original statute said if bar/restaurant owners wanted to opt out, all they had to do was post a sign at their front door. Apparently, that was too vague for the Tennessee Hostitutes, ooops, Hospitality Association...
     
  5. tjbert47

    tjbert47 Always Armed CLM

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    More good news for TN.
     
  6. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    The more the merrier.. :)

    IGF
     
  7. Spiffums

    Spiffums I.C.P.

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    I think they need proper signage too, but that's just my opinion.
     
  8. Eyescream

    Eyescream hates you

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    I really wish we had some kind of 30.06-type responsibility for business owners that don't want people to carry on the premises. I'm all for the rights of business owners to dictate who can and cannot do what in their businesses, but give us HCP holders something consistent to look for. Dictate placement and size and verbiage for property owners to use so it's easy for everybody to follow the law.
     
  9. Bob45

    Bob45

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    So is it yes or no in bars? We go to Gatlinburg and Nashville and I need to know
     
  10. Eyescream

    Eyescream hates you

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    Sorry, it's no. There was an injunction placed back towards the beginning of the year that basically put the new law on hold until the state lawmakers could draft one more to the judge's liking. Right now just pretend the law was never passed.
     
  11. WCrawford

    WCrawford OC Zealot

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    There is one. TCA § 39-17-1359:

    39-17-1359. Prohibition at certain meetings — Posting notice. —

    (a) An individual, corporation, business entity or local, state or federal government entity or agent thereof is authorized to prohibit the possession of weapons by any person otherwise authorized by §§ 39-17-1351 — 39-17-1360, at meetings conducted by, or on property owned, operated, or managed or under the control of the individual, corporation, business entity or government entity. Notice of the prohibition shall be posted. Posted notices shall be displayed in prominent locations, including all entrances primarily used by persons entering the building, portion of the building or buildings where weapon possession is prohibited. If the possession of weapons is also prohibited on the premises of the property as well as within the confines of a building located on the property, the notice shall be posted at all entrances to the premises that are primarily used by persons entering the property. The notice shall be in English but a notice may also be posted in any language used by patrons, customers or persons who frequent the place where weapon possession is prohibited. In addition to the sign, notice may also include the international circle and slash symbolizing the prohibition of the item within the circle. The sign shall be of a size that is plainly visible to the average person entering the building, premises or property and shall contain language substantially similar to the following:

    PURSUANT TO § 39-17-1359, THE OWNER/OPERATOR OF THIS PROPERTY HAS BANNED WEAPONS ON THIS PROPERTY, OR WITHIN THIS BUILDING OR THIS PORTION OF THIS BUILDING. FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THIS PROHIBITION IS PUNISHABLE AS A CRIMINAL ACT UNDER STATE LAW AND MAY SUBJECT THE VIOLATOR TO A FINE OF NOT MORE THAN FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($500).

    (b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to alter, reduce or eliminate any civil or criminal liability that a property owner or manager may have for injuries arising on their property.

    (c) Any posted notice being used by a local, state or federal governmental entity on July 1, 2000, that is in substantial compliance with the provisions of subsection (a) of this section may continue to be used by the governmental entity.

    (d) The provisions of this section shall not apply to title 70 regarding wildlife laws, rules and regulations.

    (e) This section shall not apply to the grounds of any public park, natural area, historic park, nature trail, campground, forest, greenway, waterway or other similar public place that is owned or operated by the state, a county, a municipality or instrumentality thereof. The carrying of firearms in those areas shall be governed by § 39-17-1311.
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