Summer electrical noise

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by InjuriousGeorge, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. InjuriousGeorge

    InjuriousGeorge

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    I live in the suburban mid-south, which means between March and November someone's AC, attic fan or whole-house fan is running in my neighborhood.

    During the ARRL Field Day we had a power outage that crippled the whole neighborhood. Luckily I have backup DC power for the station and laptop.

    Normally, 15M has S7-S9 semi-pure white noise. By semi-pure I mean it isn't just 60Hz+harmonics hum. That day, noise levels were S0. Not just on 15M either.

    Should I be looking for a distinct noise source or is this normal for a suburban environment?
     
  2. FN64

    FN64 Guest

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    Just about any "built up" area will have it's inherent noise factor. Have you tried to eliminate as much as possible from your own house?? Cut your mains off & see if the noise floor drops.. chase it down as necessary.

    If there's a particular noise source in your neighborhood that can be positively ID'd you might get it resolved..especially if it's the utility or cable company...

    Best luck with it..FN
     

  3. G23Adam

    G23Adam .- -.. .- --

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    I'd almost bet it's a unterminated coax from CATV or someone's satellite distribution system....

    Dish Network switches suck at keeping RF inside.
     
  4. R. Emmelman

    R. Emmelman Guest

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    Probably power company transformers or lines. If you can isolate it to the power company equipment you can press the issue. The FCC issues citations all the time against power companies for this. I live in a large metro area and do not have a S7-S9 on 15-M
     
  5. InjuriousGeorge

    InjuriousGeorge

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    The lines are underground, but there is a transformer box 100' away from the station.

    The ARRL antenna book has a handheld directional antenna design. I'll probably jerry-rig one together and use my HT on AM to isolate the noise.

    What's odd is that it wasn't a problem in the spring.
     
  6. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C. Guest

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    You can complain to both the power company and the cable TV company. They should both send out somebody to inspect for RF leakage. Transformers and lines can have bad connections or even a bad ground on a transformer housing can cause 60 cycle RF. Bad grounds can be noted with change during wet weather.
     
  7. n3hcp

    n3hcp Paranoid Member

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    A few years ago I had a similar problem. The power company came out and found the the transformer across the street had a problem. They replaced it and that was that. Much quicker and easier then I had imagined. T thought I would have to argue with them to get them to replace and otherwise good transformer just to clear up my noise.:shocked:
     
  8. martho

    martho Guest

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    Usually a noisy device means it is failing in some way. Many presentations at hamfests/conventions etc have said the power companies encourage these kinds of reports. It allows them to have a more efficient system and they want that!