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suggestions on good hunting knife features (skinning deer)

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Stopdropnroll, Oct 10, 2002.

  1. Stopdropnroll

    Stopdropnroll Millennium Member

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    looking to buy a quality knife...I'd be interested to know what you think are desirable features for a good deer gutting knife....

    size, length, thickness, blade material, grip material, to gut hook or not....etc....

    thanks SDnR
     
  2. Esox357

    Esox357

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    Look at Cold Steel knives they are excellant. Esox357
     

  3. tjpet

    tjpet

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    Look at the Cold Steel Master Hunter w/carbon V blade. From the non-slip rubber grip, 4" blade length, and extra thick spline for power you'll not find a better all around hunting knife for North American BG.
     
  4. SSC

    SSC

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    Assuming you are asking about sheath knives as opposed to folders. Both Gerber and Buck offer excellent knives for this purpose at reasonable prices. I prefer blade length under five inches and a drop point. A clip point would be my second choice.

    The majority of the knife makers are using very good steel, though I have had rusting problems with my coldsteel's. They do have a high carbon content. I do not like a thick spine on my field dressing knives, never saw a reason or need for it. A general camp knife yes, for dressing, no as I like the knife to be on the thin side for more control and getting in and out of tight places.

    Grips: I like a synthetic material that isn't smooth. I have never been much for the gut hook.

    Regards, SSC
     
  5. Stopdropnroll

    Stopdropnroll Millennium Member

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    On a related note Anyone have input/opinion on the Gerber "blade trader", fixed knife with interchangabe blades (hunting fillet saw...etc) ?
     
  6. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    I gotta tell you, my dad must have skinned and cut up thousands of deer. He didn't use no fancy hunting knife. He used what's called a boning knife. Basic wood handle (no finger groves), 5 inch straight stainless blade (straight on the cutting side and straight on the non-cutting side), and rounds to a point at the tip. The blade maybe starts out maybe less than 3/4 inch deap, but after repeated use and sharpening ends up being less than 1/2 inch deap, then toss it and get a new one.

    I don't know if you can picture it, but any real meat cutter uses it for boning out meat--if you can find a real meat cutter nowadays.
     
  7. Michigun

    Michigun Miss Michigan?

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    I'll 2nd this one... I've had mine for at least 7 years now. Stays sharp longer then any Buck knife I've seen & it doesn't cost you an arm & a leg. $40-$50 tops.

    I use mine to "field dress" my entire deer from start to finish & my "dressing technique" includes cutting up the rib cage along the sternum. Talk about hard on a knife! The Cold Steel takes it in stride.
     
  8. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    Anyone use the Wyoming knife?

    It is such an odd looking knife and I was wondering if they are any good.
     
  9. Arbee

    Arbee

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    This has come up before in the GT Cutting Edge Forum. You may want to do a search there. Lots of detailed information.
     
  10. Backstop

    Backstop

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    Shudder to think of an 'Oregon Boy' wanting anything other than a Benchmade! Can't get any better quality, but you can find a lot cheaper. I never liked the gerber blades I had, never seemed to hold an edge long enough.
    I have a nice inexpensive fixed blade Buck now that works just fine.
     
  11. Stopdropnroll

    Stopdropnroll Millennium Member

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    Us Ore-e-gone folks have lots to choose from, Bench-made in Oregon City, Gerber in Wilsonville, CRKT (Columbia River Knife and Tool up the Gorge....Leatherman....lots of choices...

    No doubt about it....Benchmade makes a good knife....(I own 3) But I was curious what features in a hunting skinning knife I should look for...(NOVICE hunter) .or is this like so many things, stop over-thinking and just learn how to use whatever decent tool you have.

    Earlier I noticed that one of our local sporting goods stores (GI Joes) had the aforementioned Gerber Sportmans blade trader on sale for under $25.00 (normally 42.99) ....Now, I know that this is not the end all be all in knives, but for 24.88, I took the plunge just to see what it might offer....pretty neat little set up. (for the price, Im pleased) It came with a decent 3" straight hunting blade (50-52 on rockwell scale), a 6" fillet blade and a saw blade. The blades are firmly seated in the grip without any wiggle.

    I might just give this bargain basement knife a whirl for the season, figure out what its limits are and buy accordingly next year...

    I will be looking at the Cold Steel website carefully....tjpet makes the knife sound pretty appealing.Benchmade didnt offer too much in the hunting/outdoorsy catagory.
     
  12. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

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    This is a nice package for $75.

    clic pic
    [​IMG]
     
  13. NYGunman

    NYGunman o.oO0Oo.oO0Oo.o

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    I bought a folding OLD Timer knife at Wal*Mart for less than $10. It has one small blade and does the job just fine. If you have money to waste or plan to gut over a 1000 deer, go ahead and buy a $30+ knife.

    One of the most important things to remember when you gut a deer is never set the knife down. Knives have a habit of disappearing.
     
  14. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    A blade that is shorter is easier and safer to use. A drop point of about 3inches is about right for gutting, if you remember to keep the edge turned up. Schrade has one with a severe drop that, when sharpened works very well.

    I think the question was about gutting. The longer thin blade is a boneing knife and is used later to process the meat.

    My new favorite of knives brand is ANZA. My new Cabelas book now has them listed.

    Cold Steel makes very good reasonably priced knives also.
     
  15. Backstop

    Backstop

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    I'll echo the short blade theory for gutting. Something short is easier to handle and you're less likely to get into any 'bad air' with it! I've found that I prefer a longer blade for skinning though, but everyone likes something a little different it seems.
     
  16. Stopdropnroll

    Stopdropnroll Millennium Member

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    So the concensous is that the gutting hook is not a real advantage....

    ???
     
  17. Backstop

    Backstop

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    Gotta say I've never used a gut hook. I have always been a little 'gut hook curious' though! I will be interested to hear from some of those with experience with it as well.;a
     
  18. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

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    My best deer knife is a SOG Inc. stainless fixed-blade. It has a 1.25" serrated section at the base, followed by a 3.25" non-serrated section out to the tip. This has proven to be perfect for my needs. The 4.5" blade is just about perfect. The non-slip rubber grip has been very secure when covered in deer blood. The serrated section is a big help when cutting through tough skin and tendon -- you should have seen how easily I cut through tendons that my buddy was sawing away at with a standard blade.

    I just gutted, skinned, and boned out a big bodied spike with this knife last weekend. I know that I should get the blade touched up for next year, but if it's any less sharp that it was before dressing out that deer I can't tell. That's an impressive statement, considering the big stack of wrapped deer meat that I cut up and piled in my freezer.

    I do have a Cold Steel fixed blade as well, and can definitely recommend them as great knives. This SOG it just the one that I have used the most, and I've really grown to love that little serrated section.
     
  19. chucha

    chucha

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    If you don't have much practice at gutting and so on and so forth, I would go with most of the above and use a fairly short blade. The thing of it is, with (for example) a deer, you want to make a cut in the hide way down low, get two fingers into it and kinda let the blade of the knife (held in the other hand), pull and scoot along so the tip of the blade does'nt dip into the guts. I never used a "gut-hook" blade but the theory seems sound, just keep pulling up and unzip.

    I am an old fart, knowing what I know now, if I were buying a knive to last me for the rest of my life and still pass on to whoever is outlasting me, I would go for the Marble Sport with the Safegrip handle and the Cordova(?) sheath. It will take care of your gutting and skinning chores as well as being a great all-around camp knive to slice the bacon, carve the ostrich, cut the cards, and so on and so forth!

    taa, cha;f
     
  20. Glocktex

    Glocktex

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    I shot an Axis doe earlier this year and a friend of mine had a gut hook knife and I sweet talked him into gutting my deer and I must say that the hook worked great. After he sliced up from pelvis to sternum he then went back and virtually 'unzipped' the thin abdomen musculature with ease. No puncturing of the guts or anything. It was pretty slick.