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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Both of mine have finally crapped out - the turntable won't hold a constant speed any longer and the cassette player just died. I may look into repairing them, but any suggestions for good high quality replacements? Thanks guys.
 

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I could find mine. Scott ps48a belt drive, it’s boxed up somewhere. Best record player I ever had. No clue where it is at moment. Newer needle. Bought in college, hooked to boom box with pre amp. Then bought a system.
Dang did I waste money, space on that. much smaller, cheaper units gave 90% of sound quality. But I was working “electronics reinforcement”. Sound board for bands, singing groups, lectures...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies guys. FWIW my turntable (which I've had for 50 years) is a Technics SL-D1 direct drive. I did replace/upgrade the cartridge about ten years ago. Cassette decks have been more problematic. I'm on my third one over the last 50 years. There's a guy in my town who repairs old stereo components who told me the turntable might be an easy fix. Haven't talked to him about the cassette deck.
 
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Both of mine have finally crapped out - the turntable won't hold a constant speed any longer and the cassette player just died. I may look into repairing them, but any suggestions for good high quality replacements? Thanks guys.

2cats nailed it. Rega offers great bang for the buck tables and cartridges.

OP do you have a separate phono preamp? Is there one in your receiver/preamp? Was there one in your old 'table? You'll need one somewhere.

Cassette decks are a problem. Might you be able to skip the cassette? Is your music stored on HDD? If you are using cassettes as one of your main storage modalities you need to move all that to HDD. Audio quality on cassettes degrades markedly with play. HDDs play perfectly until the drive dies........when that happens switch to a back up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
2cats nailed it. Rega offers great bang for the buck tables and cartridges.

OP do you have a separate phono preamp? Is there one in your receiver/preamp? Was there one in your old 'table? You'll need one somewhere.

Cassette decks are a problem. Might you be able to skip the cassette? Is your music stored on HDD? If you are using cassettes as one of your main storage modalities you need to move all that to HDD. Audio quality on cassettes degrades markedly with play. HDDs play perfectly until the drive dies........when that happens switch to a back up.
Will definitely look into Rega.

No separate phono preamp - I always assumed it was in either the turntable or the receiver.

Good advice on the cassettes. I should probably get a device to transfer all my cassettes to another format. Any recommendations?
 
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From ya'll's mind to mine...hmmm?

I've been contemplating building another component stereo system. Many years ago, I had a neat system. Technics, Marantz, and Realistic...and other components I don't remember. I picked stuff up in the Air Force from the BX, stores in Denver and Memphis and from friends.

Frankly, I don't even know where to start anymore. I guess I need a good receiver, turntable, a good CD player, and amp and some really good speakers...

As with so many things in life, I let stuff get away from me over the years, I guess at some point I just stopped taking the time to just listen to my records and tapes...kids will do that for you. But I still have my 300+ records, cassettes, CDs....

I had a really nice Japanese made reel to reel...but one of my brothers talked me out of it...I need to see if he still has it and the tapes..I doubt they're playable, and he's on his 3rd wife since then...there's no telling what got left behind by him.
 
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I have a couple of recently retired double cassette decks from Sony.

Both are in great shape, both work and most importantly they both dual record and are auto-reverse capable.

I can get more details if interested.
 

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Will definitely look into Rega.

No separate phono preamp - I always assumed it was in either the turntable or the receiver.

Good advice on the cassettes. I should probably get a device to transfer all my cassettes to another format. Any recommendations?
I'm super jammed up for time, I'll circle back later.

Take a little time and think about and I'm going to assume you have a decent internet connection.

Take a look at Tidal, Spotify, Apple Music etc. and see if one of those services might have most of your current library online via their service.

If one of them does:
1. You can avoid having to move your current library.
2. You can probably skip the cassette deck and maybe the 'table.
3. Even, "regular" streaming quality music will smoke what you've been listening to on cassette.

Your homework assignment:
1. Investigate some streaming services.
2. Investigate USB DACs (that's simply a digital to analog converter that plugs into your computer's USB port.....this is also by far the easiest way to get great sound quality out of a computer including bit-perfect high resolution music if you'd like). Keep in mind with a USB DAC based computer system you can stream and/or store music on your HDD.

2.1. Alternatively you can store and stream from your phone or iPad etc. through many DACs (analog out from phones and iPads is garbage).

A few DACs to look at:
1). Audioquest Dragonfly Red and Black.
2). Schiit - Modi ($99)
3). Cyrus Soundkey

Some of these have excellent built in volume control as well.

In my best Arnold S. voice...."I'll be back."
 

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I hated cassettes almost as much as I hate CD's except that CD's will last longer if you don't let them get scratched and can even be re-copied if they're scratched and I think there are even CD recorders although they can be recorded and copied on a desktop computer.

But the cursed cassettes not only get eaten by the tape player in your car (if there is such a thing anymore) but they can de-magnetize. I used to have some good music on cassette, some of it irreplaceable 60's Reggae mix tapes from 1980's big city radio broadcasts, but all of it eventually self-destructed.

I'm as much a throwback from the last century as the next guy, but even I know that you can download fairly good quality music onto thumb drives and play them through an audio system and whatever cassettes that you have that are still good should be transferred to a better format.

LP's are a different matter as far as longevity but collectively they weigh thousands of pounds and take up a huge amount of storage space if you ever have to move.
 

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Suggestions For High Quality Turntable & High Quality Cassette Player
The following is only my opinion, worth what you paid.

Turntables. Don't spend less than $400. Here's why; an acceptable cartridge will run about $150. An entire Crosley TT will run you about $89. They are junk right out of the box. I have a Rega Planar 3, about $1000. Their tone arms are widely used to upgrade other, older TT's. Other good units are Pro-ject and VPI. Cartridges are the personality of the unit. When comparing turntables and cartridges using A/B tests, you will definitely hear a difference. If buying in person, compare them using a record you're familiar with. Otherwise, settle for a unit that has a cart in >$100 range. Tip: the best cartridges have non-user replaceable styli. Inquire.

I also have a Music Hall MMF 9.1, about $2300. With TT's there is a diminishing return. The difference between a $200 unit and a $1000 unit is big. Between a $2000 and a $10,000 less, still there. The AV Design Haus' Dereneville VPM will run you about $650,000. Or, you can spend $40,000 on a Transrotor unit and be quite happy. Google the images.

I would advise a unit in the $400-$800 range, maybe a bit more. Do not buy a unit with built-in analog to digital converter (USB port) because they are also junk. If you want to digitize music spend a little and get something like a NAD PP4 stand alone unit. Low cost quality and flexible. I use the now obsolete PP3 and love it. Vacuum tubes are ok, but not in an A to D converter, imo.

I have about 800 cassette tapes that I care about. Many independent artists still make only tapes due to low cost. Nakamichi decks are generally considered the best, but there are others. I take a cassette and digitize it because I use only memory sticks in my cars. The Nakamichi Dragon referred to above is the King, but hang on to your wallet. I replaced the belt on my NAK DR10 (a job not impossible to do, but not for the faint of heart either) and I like that unit a lot. You can pick up a good working Nakamichi BX 125 for not too much money. They sound surprisingly good and should give decent service. When the BX 125 craps out it is almost always the idler tire that is the culprit. A relatively simple fix. If you buy a 125, get a guarantee. Also, avoid dual cassette decks unless you truly need to duplicate tapes. They are generally junk. So are most working decks that cost under $40 used.

Do a little homework and most of this will make sense. A few years back I went to a store in West Los Angeles and while they could easily have upsold me, they sold me what was right for me and earned my business from now on.
 

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Will definitely look into Rega.

No separate phono preamp - I always assumed it was in either the turntable or the receiver.

Good advice on the cassettes. I should probably get a device to transfer all my cassettes to another format. Any recommendations?
I used to use the freeware program "audacity" to do recording, using an old-school Soundblaster audio card and directly connect the RCA out of the source to the sound card.

Grumpy
 

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I pay less than $12 a month for TIDAL due to getting the military discount. I had both TIDAL and Qobuz for a free month, and I stayed with TIDAL.

I ripped my entire CD collection into .aiff files, and that library is added to my TIDAL account which I mostly access through Audirvana. Audirvana is an app downloaded on my Mac Mini where it accesses my TIDAL account and ripped CD library. I remotely control Audirvana with the Audirvana remote IOS app on my iPhone and iPads. I sit here in my recliner where I listen to hifi and hires(MQA music files) music. I can't see it getting any better than this.

I used to have a multi-component system back in the day with a preamp, a digital expander, Nakamichi deck, Denon CD, turntable, high current amp and relatively good speakers. Now, I just have my integrated amp, speakers and Mac Mini. Hifi and hires music streaming is what I've been waiting for my entire life - high quality music with millions of titles to choose from on demand!

I like all of the separate components, but I'm happy to not have to clean albums or have to deal with scratches, bad belts or a failing drive system, load and unload CDs from the tray or have to deal with all of the problems associated with tape decks.

So, a recap, my system is a dedicated late 2012 Mac Mini, a Rote. RA-1572 integrated amp/DAC(120 wpc), Klipsch RP-600M speakers and a Klipsch 10" subwoofer. The Mac Mini stores my entire CD collection which had been ripped into high quality .aiff files. The Mac Mini streams TIDAL over wifi, and the music library/streaming digital audio is controlled by an app called Audirvana, which I remotely control by my Audirvana remote app on my iPhone and iPads.

My wife and my relatively small living room are my limiting factors so I just have a modest system at this time. Over time, everything will be upgraded but my Mac Mini, my TIDAL account and Audirvana app.

To add, TIDAL, Qobuz and other high quality streaming services will probably have most of your recorded music in their libraries so in reality, you won't have to rip your CD collection or have to deal with your other recorded music medium. You just search for the music and then add it to your collection. If you want to download an actual music file, you will have to pay in addition to your monthly fee.

To add to all of that, I'm going to upgrade but not to the highest pinnacle of audiophile bliss due to my hearing loss. The desire to pursue the likes of Raidho Acoustics speakers, Accuphase amps etc are still there, but my hearing and pocketbook are far lacking.
 
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