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subaru air conditioning opinion

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by wallyglock, May 27, 2012.

  1. wallyglock

    wallyglock

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    my 98 legacy outback w/ standard 4 cyl. was blowing not too cool air . i put in 2 cans of freon yesterday and got it fairly cool about 52-55 degree according too the vent gauge i had inserted into the vent ( yes , the air system was turned on re-circulate and high fan )
    the car was in the garage when i was doing this , with door open of course . when the second can was put in i checked the temp one last time , let the car run for 3-4 min. and **** it off .
    recapped the line and car was not used that day .
    took the car out this morning and the air was blowing HOT and the clutch was kicking on & off about every few seconds . tried it 2-3 times and car would not even run good with this going on asked a friend who does some work on cars at times ... and he thought it might need more freon. soooo i got the kit out again and started the same procedure but when i tried to hook up the 134a gas to the charging side , it actually started letting some gas out when i tried to connect the valve before i opened the valve on the can to let the charging start.
    HOWEVER the clutch DID engage and seemed to work better which might leave me to believe the system had TOO much gas ?? !!
    AND then the thought crossed my mind that since the temp was still in the fifties , it seemed that would indicate that it was lacking enough freon to get it as cold as it should be
    55 degree air is not very effective on a 94 degree day but i am reluctant to try to add any more freon due to the problem i had with the air conditioner fan i mentioned .
    is their a fairly simple answer to this :dunno: maybe a switch or relay and how come this air coming out is not any cooler since it seems to have a fairly normal charge .
    at the present time , i am hard put to take it too a garage and pay $70-$80 labor so i am starting with you guys on the forum for possible solutions
    thanks in advance
     
  2. DairyFresh

    DairyFresh

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    A good AC system should lower temps by 30-35 degrees from ambient, so 55 on a 94 degree day is pretty durn effective.

    Sounds like you over pressurized. Get a set of gauges, and check high and low side pressure with system running wide open. Check online or call around to find what your system specs are.
     

  3. wallyglock

    wallyglock

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    i was just thinking that initially when i first began charging , the temp was around 60 degrees , so accordingly , i was surprised that after adding 2 cans of gas , it should have lowered the temp more than 3-4 degrees.
    i have had other cars before that i added gas to and could get the temp down in the lower to mid 40's .
    but you may be correct in assuming that the way the system is set up on my subaru that it just may not have the capability/capacity to get much colder !
    my lady friend has a chrysler sebring and the air is ice cold .... much . much more so than mine !
     
  4. TnGlocker12

    TnGlocker12

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    Look at all of the lines and see if there is a peep sight that you can see the freon flowing through. If it has that put just enough freon in it so that it is not bubbly flowing through the sight. In other words while the system is running and you see bubbles in the peep sight, keep putting freon in it until the bubbles are gone and the freon is clear. I've always put freon in a vehicle on the low pressure side and put it in as a gas and not liquid. Also be sure that air is blowing through the condenser while sitting still. Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  5. JBG30

    JBG30

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    Here we go again.

    As a HVAC tech it amazes me that with all the regulations put on this industry any Joe can go buy a little can to charge up his car with no knowledge of what they are doing. Not that I'm against their right to do so.
    There is a myriad of things to consider beyond "is the low side pressure right?"

    Ambient temp, superheat, subcooling, ΔT. High side pressure AND temperature is not to be neglected in determining if the charge is correct. Nor is the low side pressure AND temperature. These pressures and temperatures mean something folks. None of which the average Joe can decipher.

    An automotive AC system is as simple as they come. Compressor, condenser, expansion device, evaporator, and fans. Shadetree mechanics can't even get that right but continue to offer advice as experts.

    It's always "I know a guy and he said"
    "Sounds like it's low on refrigerant"

    In the OP's case.
    It sounds like he added so much refrigerant that the compressors clutch is banging in and out from the high pressure safety opening and closing.

    BTW
    Most late model cars do not have a "peep sight", professionally called a sight glass. And by clearing it of bubbles doesn't mean the charge is correct.
    The instant it clears means you have lowered the refrigerant temperature a fraction of a degree below it's saturation temperature at a given pressure. You may need 10 - 15°F below that point.

    In a car the best bet is to pull the existing charge,
    Evacuate (vacuum pump) the system to an acceptable micron level ( don't think auto mechanics use micron gauges but I could be wrong) to remove non condensables, and weigh in the nameplate charge.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2012
  6. Gareth68

    Gareth68

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    JBG has succinctly nailed it. You are over your head. While ac work is not "rocket surgery," it needs more knowledge, tools, and research than the average amateur is willing to invest.

    You need to evacuate and start over at this point with a measured charge.

    You are over filled.

    He and I have gone around in the past on some things...as I am a do it your selfer myself.

    But I have a rather serious tool and knowledge fetish which allows me to tread deeper into the pool. And still I understand the risks enough on anything I do to know when it's not worth it or the specialty tools are too much to bother with.

    If you want to play with your cars ac system you first need a basic knowledge of refrigeration systems. Without it you will never guess your way to diagnosing, for example, if you had a clogged orifice tube.

    You need a good set of gauges to measure the high low pressure.

    You need a good vacuum pump capable of evacuating under 40 microns... preferably to 25 or better.

    You would be well served to have a sniffer, but you can get by with a UV dye kit and black light to find leaks.

    You need hose disconnect tools.

    Did I mention, basic knowledge of utilizing this equipment?

    Start by reading, lots of stuff on the net....much of it wrong, but if you sift through the chaff you can find the wheat.

    You want to play with your houses AC it gets more fun. Dry nitrogen, silver solder, GOOD meters etc.

    But it's knowledge worth gaining IMHO...

    Of course, I think that about most anything mechanical in nature.