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Strange Helo Accident

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Wulfenite, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    http://www2.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20040825X01284&key=1

    NTSB Identification: SEA04TA163
    14 CFR Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load
    Accident occurred Tuesday, August 17, 2004 in Mead, WA
    Aircraft: Bell 206B, registration: N34698
    Injuries: 1 Fatal.

    This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

    On August 17, 2004, at 0945 Pacific daylight time, a Bell 206B helicopter, N34698, was destroyed when it impacted terrain following a loss of control while hovering out of ground effect near Mead, Washington. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the United States Department of Energy. The purpose of the public use flight conducted under Title 14 CFR Part 133 was to string power lines for the Bonneville Power Administration. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Felts Field Airport in Spokane, Washington at 0650.

    According to information gathered by FAA inspectors who responded to the accident site, the helicopter was pulling rope that was to be used to install a static wire at the top of 220-foot-tall towers supporting a 500 kilovolt power line. The rope was attached to the helicopter's cargo hook and played out of a truck mounted reel machine. The reel machine operator was interviewed by the FAA inspectors and stated that "he saw the adjacent turn of line cross over the out feed line causing the line to start being retracted." The reel machine operator immediately moved the machine's shift lever from "OUT" to "NEUTRAL," but by the time he had accomplished this, the rope between the reel and the helicopter went taut. Numerous witnesses, who were all members of the work crew installing the wires, reported that when the rope went taut, the helicopter pitched up and rolled right. The helicopter descended, impacted the ground and came to rest on its right side.
     
  2. KSS745

    KSS745 The Geek!!

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    Im in Spokane and work for a private security company. I didnt witness the crash but did see the wreckage. My company has a site at Spokane International Airport. Every monday morning i used to watch the pilot pull the aircraft from the hanger go through preflight stuff and take of toward the north side of Spokane. The monday before the crash however I saw him start to take of and about 30 feet of the groung the Helicopter started to pitch all over during hover. He flew the a/c to an empty area of the tarmac and hovered for maybe 3 minutes, landed it back in his parking area and put the a/c away and thats all he did to it the rest of the day for all i could tell. Then the next friday morning im on patrol on the northside of Spokane. Our company does building check for the Bonneville Power Administration, I noticed one of their gates are open. So i go to investigate and see the downed a/c in a field with another security officer from another agency watching the wreckage. So by what i saw, im almost positive it was mechanical.
     

  3. Texas T

    Texas T TX expatriate CLM

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    Did you tell this to the investigating team? If not, I suggest you do so.
     
  4. KSS745

    KSS745 The Geek!!

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    really I wouldnt have the first clue how to get a hold of anyone like that. Any info would be appreciative thanks.
     
  5. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    I wonder if he punched off the line when "it went taut".

    The electric release button is generally on the top of the cyclic and the mechanical release is between the seats.

    What KSS745 saw sounds like it could be hydraulics failure initially, except the pilot wouldn't be hovering for 3 minutes. The 206 is a bugger to hover with the hydraulics out.

    What's even worse is the hydraulics being intermittent.
    With a hydraulics problem you turn the switch off so they don't come back on at a bad time while you are manhandling the controls.

    Be interesting to see what the problem was.

    I hate those stupid *** kind of jobs.
    It seems like someone is always coming up with new ways to kill pilots.


    KSS745, you say you are at the airport. Just stop in the FAA office and tell them you saw something that might or might not have something to do with the crash. Let them take it from there.


    The hook release is the black button in the clear plastic at the top of the cyclic. The mirror between the pedals is to see the hook.
    I only had this bird a little while. I didn't need a hook on my job.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. FLMarine

    FLMarine

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    If it was a hydraulics problem and he turned the hydraulic boost switch off and had an electrical failure that could lead to bad things such as a hard over if there was already problems with the hydaulic actuators. The hydraulic system on the 206 is spring loaded open and has to have electicity to shut it off. The 206 is definitly a pain to hover without hydraulics as M2 said.
     
  7. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    FLMarine,

    I lost hydraulics on final to a small barge heliport.

    Would you believe I took off again, with no hydraulics, to fly over to our base. (never said I was very smart)

    You think the approach and landing is hard, try taking off.

    No, better not;f


    If you ever fly a Bell 407 you will see an even worse ship to control hydraulics out.:)

    The old Sikorsky H19 was really a bugger to land hydraulics off, it would easily go into ground resonance on a normal landing.

    Take care.
     
  8. FLMarine

    FLMarine

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    I've done about 10-15 approches with the hydraulics turned off in the TH-57B (206) and it's a pain. I end those approches in a 5 ft 5 kias air taxi. Don't want to try a take off without those hydraulics.
     
  9. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Due to most of our landings being made to small elevated heliports our hydraulics off practice had to terminate to a hover instead of a run on landing.

    We also had FAA approval to operate in the Dead Man's Curve during take off and landing since we were near zero AS at about 100 feet during TO and LDG offshore.

    I met a couple pilots that received back injuries from losing the engine on takeoff. They hit pretty hard.
    It's not easy to do a hovering autorotation from 100 feet.;f

    This is a quarters platform. Some are very nice. Some are roach motels.
    This is a fairly large heliport.

    [​IMG]