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Consummate Reloader
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It’s the same hoarders that bought all the .22lr during the last shortage!
Oh BS! All free Americans can and should stockpile ammo. To call it hoarding is purely pejorative and selfish. You would only call it hoarding if you FAILED to stockpile when ammo prices were as cheap as they had been in over ten years and the economy was booming. You don't stockpile during a shortage but you might shoot less especially if the ranges are closed.

Blaming others for your own failures is typical. When there is rioting after the election are you going to blame me when you run out of toilet paper and food? Go to the store NOW and stock up.
 

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I didn't stock ammo just for this election I don't think we are that desperate just yet. I stock more for future needs 5, 10, 20 years from now when the rule of law has totally collapsed and it's everyone for themselves. I have suggested on this forum on more than one occasion that having a lifetime ammo supply for 2 or 3 primary calibers would be the ultimate answer.
 

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I seriously want to get into reloading. I've never done it before. Any advice on safety and equipment would be greatly appreciated.
I see it's pretty darn expensive to start, and I also notice some calibers are not very cost effective to reload.
Thanks in advance
I suggest reading the stickies at the top of Glock Talk's reloading forum. Questions about reloading are best posted in this forum. Component shortages, particularly primers, will probably delay anyone getting started now. It is a learning process, so you can't just start without putting in some time. Buy a Lyman 50th Edition Reloading Manual and read it.


https://www.glocktalk.com/forum/reloading.26/

https://www.amazon.com/Lyman-50th-R...d=1&keywords=lyman+50th&qid=1604242401&sr=8-1
 

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I suggest reading the stickies at the top of Glock Talk's reloading forum. Questions about reloading are best posted in this forum. Component shortages, particularly primers, will probably delay anyone getting started now. It is a learning process, so you can't just start without putting in some time. Buy a Lyman 50th Edition Reloading Manual and read it.


https://www.glocktalk.com/forum/reloading.26/

https://www.amazon.com/Lyman-50th-R...d=1&keywords=lyman+50th&qid=1604242401&sr=8-1
Thanks. Will do...
 

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Technically, I'm done buying. I gave another 700 rounds coming and have been buying some a little at a time.

If a good price comes along, though, I may jump on it.
 

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I seriously want to get into reloading. I've never done it before. Any advice on safety and equipment would be greatly appreciated.
I see it's pretty darn expensive to start, and I also notice some calibers are not very cost effective to reload.
Thanks in advance
Reloading is safe and easy as long as you follow the manuals on powder weight and take the time to check your work.
Single stage presses are inexpensive, and the safest way to get started. But the are REALLY slow. Still, even if you move to a progressive press, a good single stage press is nice to have around.
Progressive presses are awesome because they are very fast. But the downside to a progressive setup is that you can turn out a lot of mistakes fast too. Personally, if I got a single stage again it would be an RCBS. My current setup is a Dillon progressive. Dillon service is awesome, and their products are great.
If you decide to go the Dillon route Brian Enos is a dealer (Google is your friend) and he can set you up with everything you will need.
 

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Thank
Reloading is safe and easy as long as you follow the manuals on powder weight and take the time to check your work.
Single stage presses are inexpensive, and the safest way to get started. But the are REALLY slow. Still, even if you move to a progressive press, a good single stage press is nice to have around.
Progressive presses are awesome because they are very fast. But the downside to a progressive setup is that you can turn out a lot of mistakes fast too. Personally, if I got a single stage again it would be an RCBS. My current setup is a Dillon progressive. Dillon service is awesome, and their products are great.
If you decide to go the Dillon route Brian Enos is a dealer (Google is your friend) and he can set you up with everything you will need.
Thanks! Just the type of info. I was looking for...
 

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I'm more or less thinking of reloading as a kind of hobby. I don't really consider this work...
A lot of people love reloading. I’m a tradesman/supervisor, still spend a lot of time on the machines which after set up is very repetitive work. So reloading is work for me. For years I worked a second job that I enjoyed. One good weekend and I could buy a years worth of ammunition.
 

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Oh BS! All free Americans can and should stockpile ammo. To call it hoarding is purely pejorative and selfish.
We all have our own definitions of opinions of hoarders and others who stockpile ammo. Mine are:

Stockpiler/prepper/well prepared shooter: Someone that buys ammo when it is inexpensive and plentiful. Doesn't stop anyone from buying what they want or need or contribute to high prices or shortages when demand is high. The most annoying thing about those of us that fall into this category is our habit of bragging about our ammo stash during a shortage and berating those who didn't stock up for being short sighted just to rub it in.

Hoarder: Someone that waits until AFTER a shortage has started, panics, buys whatever they can whenever they can. This makes the shortage last longer than it should and drives up prices. We would all be better off if hoarders took a deep breath and quit buying at inflated prices. But they hurt themselves more than others when they buy at inflated prices and stop shooting until prices are back down.

Scalper: Someone that waits until a shortage starts and then buys ammo when they can get a good deal with the intention of selling to some desperate new gun owner willing to pay the highest price. Scum of the earth. I don't have a problem with retailers charging what the market will bear but this is different.
 

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If you even suspect you may be afflicted with ADD(attention deficit disorder) don't even think about reloading.

That's my sage advice for today.
 

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A lot of people love reloading. I’m a tradesman/supervisor, still spend a lot of time on the machines which after set up is very repetitive work. So reloading is work for me. For years I worked a second job that I enjoyed. One good weekend and I could buy a years worth of ammunition.
I feel the same way. I really liked it as a hobby years ago. But as time went on it became a tedious chore. And for safety reasons its not the sort of tedious chore you can do while watching TV, you have to pay attention. Its great if you like it but not everyone does. I quit reloading and doing my own yard work about the same time and both decisions were expensive. But hiring someone to do tasks you loathe is money well spent and I wish I had started doing so earlier.
 

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If you even suspect you may be afflicted with ADD(attention deficit disorder) don't even think about reloading.

That's my sage advice for today.
I have been diagnosed with it.

Sent from my SM-A505U using Tapatalk
 

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We all have our own definitions of opinions of hoarders and others who stockpile ammo. Mine are:

Stockpiler/prepper/well prepared shooter: Someone that buys ammo when it is inexpensive and plentiful. Doesn't stop anyone from buying what they want or need or contribute to high prices or shortages when demand is high. The most annoying thing about those of us that fall into this category is our habit of bragging about our ammo stash during a shortage and berating those who didn't stock up for being short sighted just to rub it in.

Hoarder: Someone that waits until AFTER a shortage has started, panics, buys whatever they can whenever they can. This makes the shortage last longer than it should and drives up prices. We would all be better off if hoarders took a deep breath and quit buying at inflated prices. But they hurt themselves more than others when they buy at inflated prices and stop shooting until prices are back down.

Scalper: Someone that waits until a shortage starts and then buys ammo when they can get a good deal with the intention of selling to some desperate new gun owner willing to pay the highest price. Scum of the earth. I don't have a problem with retailers charging what the market will bear but this is different.
Oh, I see.

So someone who doesn't get in YOUR way is a nice guy, a 'well prepared shooter'...a hoarder is someone who inconveniences you...and what you call a 'scalper', 'scum of the earth', most people would call a 'capitalist'.

:waving:
 

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Oh, I see.

So someone who doesn't get in YOUR way is a nice guy, a 'well prepared shooter'
Someone that doesn't get in ANYONE's way is a nice guy. What did our buying ammo when it was available all over the internet for $170/ case hurt? Nothing. Who did it inconvenience? No one.

I don't have a problem with stores selling ammo for whatever the market will bear. But scalpers are different. They are the loan sharks of the shooting world, making the shortage worse by buying any reasonably priced ammo when it becomes available for the express purpose of ripping off desperate people that feel they have no choice. A store pricing ammo so it does not fly off the shelf strikes me as very different,
 

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But scalpers are different. They are the loan sharks of the shooting world, making the shortage worse by buying any reasonably priced ammo when it becomes available for the express purpose of ripping off desperate people that feel they have no choice.


Your post reeks of a socialist or even communist viewpoint.
They DO have a choice. Buy it...or DON'T buy it. No one is forcing them to do anything...and if they want it so badly, why didn't they go buy it off the shelf themselves before your 'scalper' did? Too lazy to go find it, then complain about the price? That doesn't fly.
 

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We all have our own definitions of opinions of hoarders and others who stockpile ammo. Mine are:

Stockpiler/prepper/well prepared shooter: Someone that buys ammo when it is inexpensive and plentiful. Doesn't stop anyone from buying what they want or need or contribute to high prices or shortages when demand is high. The most annoying thing about those of us that fall into this category is our habit of bragging about our ammo stash during a shortage and berating those who didn't stock up for being short sighted just to rub it in.

Hoarder: Someone that waits until AFTER a shortage has started, panics, buys whatever they can whenever they can. This makes the shortage last longer than it should and drives up prices. We would all be better off if hoarders took a deep breath and quit buying at inflated prices. But they hurt themselves more than others when they buy at inflated prices and stop shooting until prices are back down.

Scalper: Someone that waits until a shortage starts and then buys ammo when they can get a good deal with the intention of selling to some desperate new gun owner willing to pay the highest price. Scum of the earth. I don't have a problem with retailers charging what the market will bear but this is different.

Nit-Wit.... Someone who fails to see or care about the signs of coming supply disruption, and act accordingly.

Seemingly oblivious to the word or the event taking place around them.

i.e.: someone who comes on the forums stating a revelation such as.... Man, did you know ammo is hard to get....

OR... Have you seen the price of ammo lately.

Despite being months into the shortage.
 

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I have been diagnosed with it.
Me too. And it's not like it's curable.

Now I'm too old to even take the medication that helps one stay "on track"(high blood pressure).

ADD and tinnitus suck and are here to stay once you get them. Dammit.

My apologies for going off-topic. I have ADD.
 

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I’m proudly NOT part of this stupidity.
I’m sorry to say it but whoever is paying this ridiculous prices ****ing deserves it.


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Me too. And it's not like it's curable.

Now I'm too old to even take the medication that helps one stay "on track"(high blood pressure).

ADD and tinnitus suck and are here to stay once you get them. Dammit.

My apologies for going off-topic. I have ADD.
I won't and never have taken any medication for it. I just learned to make it work for me. That's why I drive truck. I can't be in one place all day. I need a constantly changing environment to keep my attention. And I do well. Most people who have it also have very high IQs. It's a contributing factor in most cases. If you learn to deal with it it can actually be an advantage


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