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There may be video of Deputy Scott Peterson outside the building at where the shooting occurred. Two other deputies have been placed on restricted duty. Peterson was about to be suspended without pay but instead resigned. Peterson was a school officer of the year in 2014 (?)
 
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Sounds like the burden of it is weighing heavily upon him.

Yeah, but ....

The Sheriff said he'd suspended the deputy without pay, which is a big step along that path of IA and potential progressive discipline, and then he used the term "resigned", and then he modified it to "resigned slash retired", because the deputy has the time to qualify for retirement. Well, yeah, if he has 32-33 years in-service (depending on the starting/end months involved), he's certainly got the time to pull the pin.

I can understand if the deputy is feeling the emotional weight of wondering whether he could have done anything different that day, or could've been in a different place that might've out him exactly where he was needed ... but being suspended without pay would seem to introduce a different sort of message in the mix.

We've all seen some peers opt for retirement (or resignation) rather than face the results of some justified and appropriate action which would end up subjecting them to appropriate discipline (embarrassment, demotion, loss of wages or specialty assignments, termination, etc) ... but we've also seen some peers who knew they didn't do anything that would end up justifying an IA/admin susp process (or unwanted transfer, loss of step incentives, etc ), and since they had ample time to retire they decided to just retire and walk away, rather than stick around and be subjected to some witch hunt or the usual politics.

Guess we'll see the results of the investigations, at least to the extent deemed appropriate for public release, at some point in the coming months.
 

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Does anyone know what is current state of the art active school shooter training? I think I read or heard or imagined something some years back about first responding forming up into four man teams before making an entry. But that was some time ago and may also have involved using kerosene lanterns for lighting.

And I am neither condoning nor disparaging what he did, just curious whether or not there is training or policy.
 
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Good Lord. I pray he didn’t fail to engage. But, that’s not what it sounds like.

One cop, 45 acre campus.
Well we all know 20% does 80% of the work on any Department. Most people who are SROs are in retirement mode or are not sheepdogs to begin with.
 

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I was an SRO. All that I know is that ALL of our active shooter training started with the premise that you engage the threat. You don't wait for the calvary. Every second wasted is a potential life lost. You go straight to the sound of gunfire and engage the threat. The mass shooters tend to be cowards at heart. Most crumble at the first sign of resistance. They either off themselves or surrender. If it's your time to go, you go out putting yourself in harms way.
 

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Does anyone know what is current state of the art active school shooter training? I think I read or heard or imagined something some years back about first responding forming up into four man teams before making an entry. But that was some time ago and may also have involved using kerosene lanterns for lighting.

And I am neither condoning nor disparaging what he did, just curious whether or not there is training or policy.
When I started it was the “diamond” four-man team. Now it’s first on first up. You’d better get in there and start slinging some lead.
 

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Sounds the sheriff is looking for fall guys to cover his butt before the next election. Without knowing what the policy is regarding response to an active shooter, we can't know if Peterson's actions were wrong. The arguments over going in alone versus waiting to form teams in response to an active shooter has been going on since Columbine.

I would be very curious as to what the department's written policy actually says. In fact, I would be quite curious to know if they even have a written policy. You would assume that in this day and age in a community of that size that they would, but nothing surprises me any more. If the department failed to establish a response plan, train employees on how to implement it, and then commit it to written policy, then that's on the administration and the sheriff needs to be held responsible at the ballot box.

My department has a plan for responding to active shooters and we've all been trained on how to execute it. A choice was made between waiting to form teams versus single officers making entry and that's what we'll do if the worst happens here.
 

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The last I heard (and I have by choice gotten less and less engaged with anything going on since I retired), it was first guy on scene gets to the shooter and puts him down. The odds are overwhelmingly in the officers' favor. Something like 95% of the time, even a solo officer wins against an active shooter.
 

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Sounds the sheriff is looking for fall guys to cover his butt before the next election. Without knowing what the policy is regarding response to an active shooter, we can't know if Peterson's actions were wrong. The arguments over going in alone versus waiting to form teams in response to an active shooter has been going on since Columbine.

I would be very curious as to what the department's written policy actually says. In fact, I would be quite curious to know if they even have a written policy. You would assume that in this day and age in a community of that size that they would, but nothing surprises me any more. If the department failed to establish a response plan, train employees on how to implement it, and then commit it to written policy, then that's on the administration and the sheriff needs to be held responsible at the ballot box.

My department has a plan for responding to active shooters and we've all been trained on how to execute it. A choice was made between waiting to form teams versus single officers making entry and that's what we'll do if the worst happens here.

Fun fact - my 400+ man department doesn't HAVE an OIS policy, despite three total in the last three years.
 

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I guess nobody really knows if you'd freeze up until the situation presents itself. We all hope, and expect we'd "roll", but sometimes people freeze and don't. All the training, target shooting, planning, etc. can go out the door at the moment of needing to act . Terrible thing ... too bad, too sad.
 

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"Israel said the agency was involved in 23 calls calls involving Cruz or his brother Zachary since 2008."

Last night I heard some LEO on the radio saying mental health problems are not a good predictor of mass shootings. The thing mass shooters tend to have in common is a record of domestic violence. If so that should show up on back round checks. Any of you guys have input on this?
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yep. It vacillates. First up, hold an entry point for help to get there.

Or,

Go in alone and engage.

Unless,that’s not a good plan.

This dirtbag? go in and kill him. Beslan? You would likely die for no reason.

It’s tough.
 

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You are right, until your in the s*** you really don’t know what you will do. The problem is, you are expected to engage the threat. Ultimately that is the precise reason for the SRO to be there. We no longer live in a world where nothing is probably going to happen. These things, for whatever reason, seem to be occurring more frequently and we need to be in the mindset that you may be called to the fight every day you are on the job.
 

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I guess nobody really knows if you'd freeze up until the situation presents itself. We all hope, and expect we'd "roll", but sometimes people freeze and don't. All the training, target shooting, planning, etc. can go out the door at the moment of needing to act . Terrible thing ... too bad, too sad.
This /\/\/\/\ 1000%, I did 24.5 years in Government Service with over 18.5 years as an LEO. I saw several LEO's in that time that worked 10 or 15 years before a Truly Critical Incident occurred in their careers that caused them to quit. I saw a lot of LEO's that quit within 5 years even without having a Traumatic Ordeal, not everyone is cut out to deal with it. I'm quite sure that the SRO is beating himself up over this, I know I did even when I did what I had to do. My prayers are up for him.
 

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There should be no room for differing options here, NTOA has set the standard on this. You don’t wait. First on scene engages the threat period. Any time spent waiting lives are being lost. It’s the national standard
Yes, ... as long as the SO employing the deputy doesn't have a policy, or has provided training to him, that differs from what's promoted by the NTOA and its 40,000 members.

Also, (just to yank your chain a bit) ... :)
In 2013, ALERRT at Texas State was named the National Standard in Active Shooter Response Training by the FBI.
https://alerrt.org/page/about

I just mention this organization because a close friend is a trainer for them (not FBI).

You're right, though, we've essentially come full circle regarding an important response to immediate/active threats (what we've come to call "active shooters" nowadays), meaning to find them, engage them and stop them. Now. If you have backup, fine, but waiting for another 1 or 2 cops to arrive might mean allowing the killer(s) - "active shooter(s)" - more time and opportunity to find and kill victims.

Just like what we were told to do if such a situation occurred when I carried a service revolver as a young cop. What was old is new again.
 
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