close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

stiffening glock trigger

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by jab-law, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. jab-law

    jab-law

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2005
    I would like to make my glock trigger a bit stiffer, to make AD's less likely.
    Is the New York trigger spring or the 8 lb trigger connector a better way to go?

    Which is easier to install/less maintenance/less problems?
    Any info would be appreciated.
    thanks
     
  2. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

    Messages:
    20,048
    Likes Received:
    340
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 1998
    Location:
    Stuarts Draft, Virginia
    Of the two choices, I would suggest the 8# connector.
     

  3. Custom Glock Racing

    Custom Glock Racing I did it first. Millennium Member

    Messages:
    3,028
    Likes Received:
    12
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 1999
    Location:
    Arizona
    I would rather use the 8lb connector.
     
  4. gary newport

    gary newport

    Messages:
    5,741
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Location:
    People's Republic of California
    The LEAST expensive and MOST effective approach to avoid ADs is to learn to keep your finger OFF the trigger until you intend to pull it. Increasing trigger pull weight by a couple or three pounds is NOT a safe alternative!
     
  5. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    47,501
    Likes Received:
    19,232
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    Kentucky
    If you can't stop putting your finger on the trigger, don't carry a gun; if you carry a gun, learn not to put your finger on the trigger. A slightly harder trigger is not a safe alternative.
     
  6. Joe D

    Joe D Guest

    Bren, a heavier trigger pull is safer - for the bad guy. I too have never understood the logic behind making a gun more difficult to shoot when you need good accuracy the most.
    An 8 lb. connector yields a 10 lb. pull.
    I will third what the other two have said. Keep you finger off the trigger until you are ready to pull it. The gun will not fire by itself.
     
  7. mmc45414

    mmc45414

    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    While I agree about keeping your booger hook of the bang switch, I am still gonna try to pull this back on topic.

    I have heard some stuff about using the heavy spring and the lighter connectors. It seems to me that having a little more deliberate pull without the stacking that kicks in part way through the stroke might have some merit Does anybody have any experience on this?
     
  8. onduty

    onduty

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2005
    Location:
    East Valley Area, AZ
    Shooting fundamentals:
    1. Trigger control
    2. Sight alignment

    If the shooter can maintain a smooth consistant trigger pull that is comforable then go for it. Although I would not sponsor the idea that increasing the weight via new connector as a safe way to avoid ADs. Finger along the frame is the solution.
     
  9. Dolomite

    Dolomite Glock Bhagwan

    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2001
    Location:
    Milwaukee
    :animlol: Oh that's a keeper. I only hope the next time I'm running a timer at a IPSC or IDPA match, and I see someone with their finger in the trigger gaurd while doing a reload, I don't issue the "booger!" command.
    Kind of like how some feel that an Olive NY + a 3.5 lb connector lend a revolver-esque quality to the Glock?
     
  10. mmc45414

    mmc45414

    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    Yeah, I have read about this but was wondering if anybody has done it. So far all of mine are stock but the G-35 came with the light trigger.
     
  11. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    47,501
    Likes Received:
    19,232
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    Kentucky
    I did it. I even left it in overnight, since after finding out how crappy it was I didn't have time to take it out and throw it away that day. If people think the 3.5 and NY1 feels like a revolver, they've been shooting revolvers with some pretty horrible triggers...possibly powered by rubber bands. I've seen some pretty bad Glock modification ideas, and this one doesn't rank anywhere near the various slide/barrel/etc. polishing, but I think it sucks.
     
  12. SpectrePilot

    SpectrePilot

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2003
    The 8# connector produces the same trigger feel with more resistance. Using the NY 1 or 2 with a 3.5# or 5# connector produce a slightly heavier to quite heavier resistance and a different trigger feel. NEVER USE A NY TRIGGER SPRING WITH AN 8# CONNECTOR--IT JUST DOESN'T WORK.

    Its only similarity to a revolver is that it is the same resistance from start to finish. It doesn't have that normal 2-stage feel of a Glock trigger.

    You just have to play with it to determine what you like best, and neither feels like a classic S&W M19 or a crisp M1911.
     
  13. Yamadad

    Yamadad

    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Commiefornia
    To me the 8# connector gives the best, if overly heavy, trigger pull. On my G22 it gives a pretty crisp break, but like I said, overly heavy. I like it, I just wish it wasn't so heavy.
     
  14. NoMoreSmiths

    NoMoreSmiths

    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2002
    Location:
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Not to hijack the thread, and I'm sure there are 1,000 's of comments on switching to the "3.5 lb connector" to "lighten the pull"; however, since I am thus far, after 2500 rounds or so been UNABLE to "master the Glock trigger", how do the votes run on just changing to the 3.5# connector?

    I'm fine with keeping my trigger finger off the trigger - that was drilled into me many many years ago, when all I shot was a revolver. BUT, now I find this mental process taking place: (1) focus on front sight with eyes that are NOT at an age when that is as easy to do as it was 20 years back (2) once I put the tunnel-thinking about the front sight out of my mind, I find that the harder I try for the "surprise firing" (NOT "concentrating" on the trigger) - the MORE I find myself focused on the darn trigger. I've done everythig except hire a kid to smack me with as 2 x 4 every time I pull a shot more than a "reasonable amount" to the left, right, low or high.

    I never shoot more than five rounds at a time, mainly because holding or attempting to hold the sight pic AND trying to NOT focus on the trigger makes me wobble like a flag in a breeze.

    Too much info, I know. But aside from selling the gun and GETTING one of those 2 x 4's ALL suggestions will all be taken to heart!
    John :thumbsup:
     
  15. mmc45414

    mmc45414

    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    You might try staging it, just like a revolver.
     
  16. gary newport

    gary newport

    Messages:
    5,741
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Location:
    People's Republic of California
    Or try shooting from reset.
     
  17. mmc45414

    mmc45414

    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    I think we mean the same thing
     
  18. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    47,501
    Likes Received:
    19,232
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Actually, staging works very well with a Glock, since it doesn't have a revolving cylinder (works OK with a revolver most of the time too). Staging is basically the "slack out" method taught by some shooting schools. Having had a couple of class in it, I find that I greatly prefer it to the reset, since I shoot a lot of different guns udner a lot of different conditions.