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Starting "Starting Strength" on Monday

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning' started by Cameronswmp9, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. Cameronswmp9

    Cameronswmp9

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    After starting last year with a few things that helped take a few lbs off, I decided this year that I need to convert the rest (well, as much as possible). I talked to a buddy at work and together we are starting the Starting Strength program Monday after work. I joined a gym last week, he is a member of the franchise, just needs to get his transfered over to the same gym. He is now reading over the book, getting a better idea of what all is involved and what to expect.Now, I was figuring that do the program just as outlined for about 6-8 weeks, just the squats, presses (bench and standing), deads and clean before adding more onto the program. Is that a good idea or should they be tacked on from the get go? I was thinking doing it that way will provide a way to transition into the gym atmosphere better (for lack of better words) and not to be overworked right way, and concentrate on the core stuff mainly. Is that the best way to go about it? I also thought about adding some cardio twice a week in about 3 weeks (mainly hoping it will warm up here, then not overworking again).Ive gotten the diet about 85% of where it should be, so just finishing out the last little bit and doing the weights Im hoping to be making some good increases this year. I know it wont last but so long, but increases are increases and getting more in shape is the name of the game.Anything I should add or thoughts on this?Thanks S&C!
    Appearantly, GT doesnt like me using good grammar and such. Hopefully 3rd time is the charm.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  2. Cinic

    Cinic Spongy Member

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    I would do the program as long as it's working. And by working I mean you're still on a linear progression. No need to add anything or change the workout until then. Also, if you feel like you're going to start stalling, reduce your jumps. No shame in 2.5 or 1.25 pound jumps...even on squats.
     

  3. SRS

    SRS

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    Starting Strength outlines what you should do to start, and it generally doesn't include adding more than the basic lifts. Also, setting an arbitrary period before adding more lifts isn't consistent with the program. Of course, you are free to do whatever you like and may get good results, but following the program defined in Starting Strength has a history of producing good results.
     
  4. California Jack

    California Jack Millennium Member

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    i agree. follow as written.
     
  5. Eyescream

    Eyescream hates you

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    I'm throwing in with everybody else: The more you fiddle with the program, the less likely you are to get the results you want.
     
  6. BradD

    BradD

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    http://startingstrength.com/index.php/site/resources

    All of the articles are good, but The Novice Effect should be mandatory reading for someone starting SS.

    Also, spend a lot of time reading http://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=129

    Also also, watch all the Rippetoe youtube videos. Search for Rippetoe Deadlift for example.

    Like the other guys typed, do the program as it's laid out assuming your goal is to get strong. You could add some light conditioning work and not cause problems. Just remember that strength comes first, so don't do conditioning that will negatively affect your strength workout. For example, don't go running the day before squats or a bunch of pushups the day before pressing or benching.
     
  7. Green_Manelishi

    Green_Manelishi Knicker Knotter

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    I always figured if it ain't broke, I won't try to fix it.

    As soon as I am able to improve on excellence I'll write me own book.

    My best gains (in strength and size) came as a result of basic exercises such as bench and squat.
     
  8. Cameronswmp9

    Cameronswmp9

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    So, just run with the program until I cant get anymore from it? That makes me wonder why he added in the chapter of useful associated exercises.... (I know its nothing yall can answer, just kind of thinking out loud)

    I guess we will run it as far as we can take it. Anything else useful I should do or keep an eye on?
     
  9. California Jack

    California Jack Millennium Member

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    They are for when you can't run with the program anymore.
     
  10. TurboRocket

    TurboRocket

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    Cameron,

    How old are you? What are your general stats, and how much experience do you have with resistance training?

    If you are just starting out (I am making this assumption), you'll be fine on SS for quite a while. So, as the other members have said, just stick to SS and you should be fine.
     
  11. Eyescream

    Eyescream hates you

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    Run with the program until you can't get anymore out of it. Depending on a lot of different factors (how slowly you're willing to go up, using fractional plates, how honest you are with yourself when you reset after you stall on a lift, how much you're willing to eat to support the program, etc) you could make a long go of it.

    Generally, if you want to do assistance exercises, do them at the end of the workout; Rip likes for people to stick to simple stuff like dips and pullups, and, while he included them in the book, it seems like he really thinks stuff like Romanian Deadlifts and incline presses and barbell rows and whatnot are really not going to help much in the face of just doing the program properly.
     
  12. BradD

    BradD

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    He covers this in the book and ad nauseam at the Q&A Forum. The idea is that you're a "novice" as long as you've adapted so little to strength training that you can add weight about every workout. Early in the program, you'll be able to add weight every workout and some of the jumps will seem easy. At some point, you'll think to yourself that you'll never get it next time if you add whatever you added this time. Then make a smaller jump next time. Keep doing that until you can't add even the lightest increment. When you've exhausted that process, you're no longer a novice.

    This line is not clear, though, because it depends somewhat on how fat you're willing to get. The more you eat, the longer this process is going to last and the stronger you'll get. A lot of people cut the program short because they've gotten as fat as they're willing to get. This was partly my reasoning for cutting off the program when I did.

    Also, honestly, those workouts are really hard when you're near stalling out. I was getting pretty sick of doing 5,5,5 on squat with a bigger weight every time. LOL, you won't be asking about "adding exercises to the program" when you get a ways into it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  13. Cameronswmp9

    Cameronswmp9

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    I will run with it and see how it goes. Basically, it sounds like if I can still do exercises after the core exercises, Im not working hard enough, right? :D
     
  14. Green_Manelishi

    Green_Manelishi Knicker Knotter

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    Assuming you don't take long breaks between sets/exercises, you can work-out hard, or for a long time, but not both.

    In my experience, FWIW, if you do (the core) exercises the right way you will have two desires after finishing the workout:

    1) rest
    2) food
     
  15. BradD

    BradD

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    Perhaps not early in the program, but that should be true later on. Also, I found myself resting longer and longer between sets. Early on, the workouts took about 50 min. each, but later on, they were about 90 min. I've read similar times over at Rip's board.
     
  16. Eyescream

    Eyescream hates you

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    Yup. Getting strong is hard work.