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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is going to sound like a stupid question, but has anyone ever replaced all non-tenifer coated Glock parts with stainless steel aftermarket replacements? :dunno:

I know many people switch the standard recoil spring for a stainless one for carry purposes but what about the other parts? I've heard of titanium slide lock levers and extractors but if anyone has done this please fill me in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Why not? Other than cost what would be the disadvantage to stainless steel? Glocks are about as low maintenance as they come so why not increase that with stainless? If you live in humid environments stainless would be a great benefit as well as locations with salt water.
 

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Glocks n' crocs... "Other than cost what would be the disadvantage to stainless steel?"

No real disadvantage in operating your pistol, if you buy good quality factory or factory replacement parts, however your maintenance time has just sky-rocketed

You may find that that alone with be a reason not to shoot as much as you may have had you left the Glock stock.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Glocks n' crocs... "Other than cost what would be the disadvantage to stainless steel?"

No real disadvantage in operating your pistol, if you buy good quality factory or factory replacement parts, however your maintenance time has just sky-rocketed

You may find that that alone with be a reason not to shoot as much as you may have had you left the Glock stock.

Just my 2 cents.
Why would changing to stainless increase my maintenance? Conventional wisdom says stainless steel would need less work to maintain.
 

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MacGyver
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"Tenifer" treated steel is harder than stainless, close to equally corrosion proof, low gloss, and carries some cushion from defect from Glock. Polymer guide rod do not rust and is just as reliable as any aftermarket rod...

No it makes no functional advantage, so really you are just wasting money and potentially increasing the risk failure from buying from a non Glock source.

They sell MANY MANY aftermarket parts for Glocks. Just like STP and Marvel Mystery Oil-- you have to make the choice as a consumer what is necessary. You are free to do with your money as you choose.

Is a Jibbitz necessary on a Croc?
 

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MacGyver
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MIM is the new Glock catchword craze, next to BTF.

Let's put it in perspective. Ask yourself what other things could possibly be MIM: how about the parts in your 100K mile automobile that your wife and child ride in every day:

Pistons, rods, control arms, brake calipers, driveshaft...maybe even the brake rotor....hmmmm.
 

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My first Glock was a very early G17 Gen4. I never had any problems with it. I still own it. For the next few years A bought many more different Glocks. I got into changing out some parts when I first started. Now I've found the best Glocks are the stock Glocks. I switched back to stock the aftermarket triggers and springs I put in. I found the stock Glocks are more reliable and shoot just as well. I would rather spend my money on Ammo, and more guns than aftermarket parts. One thing is a must. Buy extra mags. A LOT OF EM.
 

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One of the early glock sales points was tennifer is harder than most steel. Truthfully, nothing seems to break much on Glocks. Pins and springs and such. The slide release is a good part to have,Internally The safety in the slide and the firing pin cups and such. I don't believe I have more than $50 in parts. The RSA and slide lock spring seem to catch most of the flack.

MIM is the most over done phrase here besides BTF.:supergrin:
 

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"Tenifer" treated steel is harder than stainless, close to equally corrosion proof, low gloss, and carries some cushion from defect from Glock. Polymer guide rod do not rust and is just as reliable as any aftermarket rod...

No it makes no functional advantage, so really you are just wasting money and potentially increasing the risk failure from buying from a non Glock source.

They sell MANY MANY aftermarket parts for Glocks. Just like STP and Marvel Mystery Oil-- you have to make the choice as a consumer what is necessary. You are free to do with your money as you choose.

Is a Jibbitz necessary on a Croc?
This ! SJ 40
 

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What parts are nitrocarborized (not brand name Teniffer any more)? I know the barrel and slide. Embedded steel frame parts? Controls? Internals?

Can they nitrocarborize MIM parts?

In any case, I think I'd prefer machined forgings for the striker and extractor. I think those parts take too high stress levels for MIM.

"Tenifer" treated steel is harder than stainless, close to equally corrosion proof, low gloss, and carries some cushion from defect from Glock. Polymer guide rod do not rust and is just as reliable as any aftermarket rod...

No it makes no functional advantage, so really you are just wasting money and potentially increasing the risk failure from buying from a non Glock source.

They sell MANY MANY aftermarket parts for Glocks. Just like STP and Marvel Mystery Oil-- you have to make the choice as a consumer what is necessary. You are free to do with your money as you choose.

Is a Jibbitz necessary on a Croc?
 

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Is getting rid of the various MIM parts of questionable quality a good enough reason?
IMO properly made MIM parts are great. OTOH I am convinced that Glock hasn't figured it out yet, they need to talk to S&W. I examined a MIM striker from a G22 and found that the metal was wearing and rolling at the safety cut out.
I replaced the strikers in all my guns with pre MIM.
Stainless is nice for many things, for example it resists throat erosion in high velocity rifle barrels and has resistance to corrosion. It is also harder to machine, and depending on the alloys it can have inferior tensile strength, yield strength, hardness and can transfer metal to other stainless parts when rubbing. It is not perfect or the solution to all problems by any stretch of the imagination. I'll take ordnance steel or tool steel most of the time instead of stainless.
As a side note, Beretta had a bit of a problem with some stainless parts on their stainless pistols and decided to go to a mix of both stainless and blue in later models. Naturally, it pissed off the fans that now are paying premium prices to replace the blue parts with the "better" stainless parts. Go figure.
 

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IMO properly made MIM parts are great. OTOH I am convinced that Glock hasn't figured it out yet, they need to talk to S&W. I examined a MIM striker from a G22 and found that the metal was wearing and rolling at the safety cut out.
I replaced the strikers in all my guns with pre MIM.
Stainless is nice for many things, for example it resists throat erosion in high velocity rifle barrels and has resistance to corrosion. It is also harder to machine, and depending on the alloys it can have inferior tensile strength, yield strength, hardness and can transfer metal to other stainless parts when rubbing. It is not perfect or the solution to all problems by any stretch of the imagination. I'll take ordnance steel or tool steel most of the time instead of stainless.
As a side note, Beretta had a bit of a problem with some stainless parts on their stainless pistols and decided to go to a mix of both stainless and blue in later models. Naturally, it pissed off the fans that now are paying premium prices to replace the blue parts with the "better" stainless parts. Go figure.

I love it when other manufacturers get thrown around as the standard:

http://smith-wessonforum.com/smith-wesson-m-p-pistols/334653-bad-take-down-lever-m-p-40c.html

You should also do some searching reference malfunctions caused by aftermarket RSA's.
 

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I love it when other manufacturers get thrown around as the standard:

http://smith-wessonforum.com/smith-wesson-m-p-pistols/334653-bad-take-down-lever-m-p-40c.html

You should also do some searching reference malfunctions caused by aftermarket RSA's.
I mentioned S&W because their revolvers now use MIM hammers and triggers. If you look at the single action notch on the hammer you'll see hardly any metal where the two parts interface, that spot takes a tremendous load with no problems. To me that means that their MIM works.
 

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Why not? Other than cost what would be the disadvantage to stainless steel? Glocks are about as low maintenance as they come so why not increase that with stainless? If you live in humid environments stainless would be a great benefit as well as locations with salt water.
have you had a Glock rust on you? I take mine kayaking in the Gulf. no rust problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
have you had a Glock rust on you? I take mine kayaking in the Gulf. no rust problem.
No I haven't. I'm completely new to Glocks, but not new to guns. Whenever I'm in the woods there will be a stainless old model Ruger Redhawk in 44 mag on my side. It's been in rain, snow, mud, sleet, blood, fish scales, mosquito repellent, and many other things with no rust. My personal Glock has seen none of these conditions and hasn't proved itself to me yet in that regard. So in my mind, making my Glock more like my Redhawk seemed to make more sense.

I also sweat like a hooker in church so a stainless steel recoil spring in a concealed carry gun sounded logical.
 

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I have Lightning Strike Stainless Steel captured guide rods in all seven of my Glocks...The only stainless I will put on them...:)
 

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7 x $25 = $175 + $30 after market springs

Disposable income spent for marginal appreciable improvement, if any. Again, it is like saying that you add STP in all your cars, every oil change.

Your gun, your money. Enjoy!

I have Lightning Strike Stainless Steel captured guide rods in all seven of my Glocks...The only stainless I will put on them...:)
 
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