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springfield model 1903 bolt action rifle

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Lespu, Oct 22, 2003.

  1. Lespu

    Lespu

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    hey guys. i was cleaning out my old man's stockroom when i stumbled on one of his rifles. its a springfield armory model 1903 bolt action rifle. looks solid to me. any of you good gentlemen familiar with this rifle? i think it feeds on 30-06 ammo. thanks. ;)
     
  2. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    You got a great find there. The .30-06 was made for this rifle.

    The 1903 Springfield was originally chambered in the .30-03 cartridge, but I think the Germans designed the spitzer bullet which were better for long range accuracy than the heavier round nose bullets that were the standard then.
     

  3. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    The issue rifle of U.S Forces from 1903, till about 1942, though it was officially supplanted in 1936 by the M1 Garand, it saw limited service in WW2, and in Korea as a sniper rifle (the M1903A4 model, same one used by the sniper in Saving Private Ryan). Bolt action, 5-shot, .30-06, the original home of that caliber, and he's right, it was first chambered in the .30-03 roundnose, but the spitzer bullet came out in 8mm Mauser so everyone switched over, and it became the .30 Caliber Model of 1906 (.30-06).

    If yours has a ramp rear sight (before the bolt, like on most hunting rifles) it's likely a 1903A1, the WW1-and-on version, if yours has a stamped trigger guard and a aperature rear sight mounted above the actual bolt it's an M1903A3, the hurry-up-and-get-it-made model from WW2 (1942-on I think) both work fine, the A1 is prettier and a bit more accurate (more grooves in the rifling, etc) but either does just fine. In it's original military condition if the rifle's in good shape, depending on the year it's made (look on the reciever just ahead of the bolt-lockup area when the bolt's closed) and if the parts match or are at least same-year (below the front sight with an Ordnance "bomb" mark is the barrel-year-manufactured date, on the top of the rifle) it could net you anywhere from $500-$2,000 for a rare model in good condition, maybe more (I don't know Springfield prices).

    You've got one of the classic bolt-action military rifles there. Lucky man!
     
  4. tjpet

    tjpet

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    Make sure your's is safe to shoot with modern ammo. Prior to 1918 03 receivers were only single heat treated. That led to them being brittle due to the steel used in their construction. A double heat treatment started in 1918 I believe. If your rifle is a Springfield-made model it should have a serial # above 800,000 to be safe. If a Rock Island model anything over approx. 285,000 should be OK.
     
  5. Steve in PA

    Steve in PA

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