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Perhaps it is going the other way. Maybe a super aggressive de-greaser is what you need. If you got a few touches of grease (and based upon it being near the rails and in the machined grooves where fingers would go, it may be), perhaps a really, really difficult to displace grease isn't evaporating (and your temporary clean-up chemicals are). So the chalkboard-like finish goes to chalkboard for the clean areas, but the dirty/greasy spots remain shiny. Much like cosmoline that wasn't fully removed from an SKS causes issues until boiled in solvent or baked and rubbed a hundred times...

Hoppes #9 is mostly kerosene (with at about 25% ethanol, then a handful of other materials). Kerosene can have a residue, and may not dissolve some organic residues as well as other, more aggressive solvents.

If you have a sonicator and a good detergent ( I would start with a Simple Green cleaner for sonicators) try that. Easy first step.

If you lack a sonicator, a hand-scrub with Simple Green may work.

If that fails, go even further with an aggressive organic solvent rubdown or bath (acetone, brake cleaner, etc.), which will aggressively de-grease the slide (be careful of sights, etc., as paint, some plastics, and some finishes can be damaged, caveat emptor!).

Then wipe it down and let it dry. If it dries to uniform chalkboard finish (grease is all 100% removed, try adding a treatment of your choice (Eezox, CLP, or some other clean/lube) and see what happens.


Many use brake cleaner. It is typically made primarily of acetone, with a hint of either toluene, heptane, methyl alcohol, or other organics. You might also try test spots of mineral spirits, MEK, etc. I don't know what MEK or other organics would do to the slide finish, but they are great for cleaning. I'd start with an aggressive acetone wipe (prior to a full bath!), and see how it fares. Get more aggressive as much as you dare (I don't know if MEK is safe on the finish, and the risks are yours to contemplate, but in your situation, I would take a bit of cloth and give it a try!).

If your gun was on foam in the gun case, whatever grease that may have been on the gun will be re-deposited on your slide every time you put it back in, so...

Good luck!
 
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Hoppes #9 is a solvent. Right?

Never use solvents on slides, or frames of any pistol. Use oil. Solvents are for the inside of the barrel only. Oil and a toothbrush is more than enough for everything else. I use Kroil for cleaning everything else. Glocks are fine with regular Breakfree CLP.

Never ever use solvent on melonite. Really, no harsh chemicals are needed at all, unless your barrel is fouled.
While solvents can harm finishes, treated metals are not impacted by typical organic solvents. So the nitrided parts (whether Tenifer, Melonite, Tufftride, QPQ, etc.) shouldn't be impacted by this at all. The surface finish over it may be impacted, but the metal would be safe.


"Hoppes #9" is a wide ranging portfolio of many different products with many different chemical compositions. About a hundred of them! They have the MSDS sheets on their web page for all of them, if one is curious which ones contain which chemicals.
https://www.hoppes.com/hoppes-support/ho-sds.html


To illustrate the differences in Hoppes #9 products:

Hoppes #9 Bore Cleaner is mostly kerosene (followed by about 25% ethanol, about 8% isopropyl alcohol, and with traces of about a dozen other organic ingredients under 1%).

Hoppes #9 Cleaner and Degreaser is mostly isopropanol with the remainder methanol

One you could almost use as aftershave, the other is better suited to fuel an engine, and decidedly unwise to apply to your face!
 

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There is no surface finish over melonite. And it does get gray splotchy is you use a solvent. The metal remains perfectly safe, but finish is ruined.

Especially the airborne melonite processes. The thicker bath types are way better, but saved for more important jobs that pistol parts lately.
 

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There is no surface finish over melonite. And it does get gray splotchy is you use a solvent. The metal remains perfectly safe, but finish is ruined.

Especially the airborne melonite processes. The thicker bath types are way better, but saved for more important jobs that pistol parts lately.
Glock hasn't ever stated they use the Melonite brand (they used Durferrit's sister brand "Tenifer" for a long time, prior to switching).

And finishes are quite frequently applied over carbo-nitriding (and have been for a long time with Glock).

The Tenifer metal treatment was the nitriding layer (the permeation layer that chemically is inside the metal), and then the surface finish (frying pan, chalkboard, or whatever) has been applied over the nitrocarburizing (Tenifer, gas nitriding, etc.).

Now Glock uses the nDLC finish over the gaseous carbo-nitriding for Gen5 Glock's.

The finishes Glock applies may be harmed without harm being done to the hardened metal.
 
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Perhaps it is going the other way. Maybe a super aggressive de-greaser is what you need. If you got a few touches of grease (and based upon it being near the rails and in the machined grooves where fingers would go, it may be), perhaps a really, really difficult to displace grease isn't evaporating (and your temporary clean-up chemicals are). So the chalkboard-like finish goes to chalkboard for the clean areas, but the dirty/greasy spots remain shiny. Much like cosmoline that wasn't fully removed from an SKS causes issues until boiled in solvent or baked and rubbed a hundred times...

Hoppes #9 is mostly kerosene (with at about 25% ethanol, then a handful of other materials). Kerosene can have a residue, and may not dissolve some organic residues as well as other, more aggressive solvents.

If you have a sonicator and a good detergent ( I would start with a Simple Green cleaner for sonicators) try that. Easy first step.

If you lack a sonicator, a hand-scrub with Simple Green may work.

If that fails, go even further with an aggressive organic solvent rubdown or bath (acetone, brake cleaner, etc.), which will aggressively de-grease the slide (be careful of sights, etc., as paint, some plastics, and some finishes can be damaged, caveat emptor!).

Then wipe it down and let it dry. If it dries to uniform chalkboard finish (grease is all 100% removed, try adding a treatment of your choice (Eezox, CLP, or some other clean/lube) and see what happens.


Many use brake cleaner. It is typically made primarily of acetone, with a hint of either toluene, heptane, methyl alcohol, or other organics. You might also try test spots of mineral spirits, MEK, etc. I don't know what MEK or other organics would do to the slide finish, but they are great for cleaning. I'd start with an aggressive acetone wipe (prior to a full bath!), and see how it fares. Get more aggressive as much as you dare (I don't know if MEK is safe on the finish, and the risks are yours to contemplate, but in your situation, I would take a bit of cloth and give it a try!).

If your gun was on foam in the gun case, whatever grease that may have been on the gun will be re-deposited on your slide every time you put it back in, so...

Good luck!
While solvents can harm finishes, treated metals are not impacted by typical organic solvents. So the nitrided parts (whether Tenifer, Melonite, Tufftride, QPQ, etc.) shouldn't be impacted by this at all. The surface finish over it may be impacted, but the metal would be safe.


"Hoppes #9" is a wide ranging portfolio of many different products with many different chemical compositions. About a hundred of them! They have the MSDS sheets on their web page for all of them, if one is curious which ones contain which chemicals.
https://www.hoppes.com/hoppes-support/ho-sds.html


To illustrate the differences in Hoppes #9 products:

Hoppes #9 Bore Cleaner is mostly kerosene (followed by about 25% ethanol, about 8% isopropyl alcohol, and with traces of about a dozen other organic ingredients under 1%).

Hoppes #9 Cleaner and Degreaser is mostly isopropanol with the remainder methanol

One you could almost use as aftershave, the other is better suited to fuel an engine, and decidedly unwise to apply to your face!
Glock hasn't ever stated they use the Melonite brand (they used Durferrit's sister brand "Tenifer" for a long time, prior to switching).

And finishes are quite frequently applied over carbo-nitriding (and have been for a long time with Glock).

The Tenifer metal treatment was the nitriding layer (the permeation layer that chemically is inside the metal), and then the surface finish (frying pan, chalkboard, or whatever) has been applied over the nitrocarburizing (Tenifer, gas nitriding, etc.).

Now Glock uses the nDLC finish over the gaseous carbo-nitriding for Gen5 Glock's.

The finishes Glock applies may be harmed without harm being done to the hardened metal.

THANK YOU! Good info here. I like the Simple Green idea.
 

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Agree with the comments on the foam absorbing the oil and drying out the slide, mine does that too. I wrap it up with a micro fiber.
 

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Take your own advice then. You implied that I somehow damaged the slide myself. I don’t appreciate your accusatory tone either. If you don’t have anything helpful to contribute to this thread I started for suggestions and ideas, leave. Keep your conspiracies, implications, and accusations to yourself. Thanks.
Good grief. I implied NOTHING. My commentary that you quoted was directed to fuzzy03cls and fuzzy03cls alone, and was in no way "accusatory" towards you, so get over it and grow up for Chrissakes.
 

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If anyone wants a quick thread summary...

The original poster f'd up his slide and instead of owning it he's blaming Glock.

WTF?!?
 

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That's what my Glock looked like when I first took it out of the case. The ridges in the foam absorb the oil in spots. I just wiped it down like normal and it went away. With CLP, not bore cleaner.

Sent from my SM-T380 using Tapatalk
 

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I’m vouching for the OP. This is crappy finish from Glock. Same issue here, the Glock29 was manufactured in April 2021, bought it in June. The nitrite finish is blotchy. I took it back to the store, they sent it back to Glock, I just got it back today and the finish is the same. The sportsman warehouse guy cleans it with CLP, sprays with oil and hands it back to me “see good as new” I’m like you dunce, I’ve already done this. When it dries out a day later it goes back to blotchy finish. He tries to tell me Glock changed their finish process and this is how they are, “the metal will absorb oil over time and look fine” he says.
I do metal work, this is a bull crap answer. I’ve seen a few like this in store cases and it’s the Glock finishing process.
Nothing you can do, just go get it cerakote theme or color of your choice. It’s not the foam!! I’ve stored several flocks in the foam cases and it doesn’t do this ding dongs !!!!
 

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I've never had this problem on any of my nearly two dozen Glocks.

New gun owners tend to create non existant problems with perfectly fine and serviceable Glocks. I would be embarassed to say I sent a gun back because the finish faded on it a bit just from touching foam.
 

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dude, I’m not a “new gun owner” . I haven’t seen this either in 4 glocks, OR Guns in the case at the store. It happens, and it’s clearly contaminates prior to the finishing stage, like improper prep, oil or in the nitriting process . Just google it, there are tons of current examples of this happening. Does it resolve over time? Maybe, but the posts don’t say so. We’ll have to see.

let’s say it’s 1-5% of the glocks have this problem. That’s why it largely goes unnoticed.
Its not the foam. I’ll report back in this thread, I’ve already cleaned it with bore cleaner then oil, then CLP , then oil a few weeks later. It’s not stored in the case. So based on your opinion the issue should just go away in time? Let’s see how long.
You wouldn’t buy a car with a shotty paint job
 

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dude, I’m not a “new gun owner” . I haven’t seen this either in 4 glocks, OR Guns in the case at the store. It happens, and it’s clearly contaminates prior to the finishing stage, like improper prep, oil or in the nitriting process . Just google it, there are tons of current examples of this happening. Does it resolve over time? Maybe, but the posts don’t say so. We’ll have to see.

let’s say it’s 1-5% of the glocks have this problem. That’s why it largely goes unnoticed.
Its not the foam. I’ll report back in this thread, I’ve already cleaned it with bore cleaner then oil, then CLP , then oil a few weeks later. It’s not stored in the case. So based on your opinion the issue should just go away in time? Let’s see how long.
You wouldn’t buy a car with a shotty paint job
The Glock is meant to be shot, carried, and used. It is not designed to be caressed and fondled, or destined to become a family heirloom piece to be handed down from generation to generation or become a timeless relic that sits in a museum.

I've already seen all these examples, they are frequently posted by new members and new gun owners with little or no experience who thinks a faded spot on finish is a sign of decay and decomposition.

If your pistol is bone dry, it will get spots on it sitting in foam cases but once oiled it goes away. Get some real gun oil like Slip 2000 or Strikehold Force 5. I've seen it too many times before and it's not caused by contaminates. The foam Glock uses in their factory boxes plus many others is open cell which will absorb oils on the gun plus moisture in the air, and when it touches the Glock all of it is put right on where it touches. You can look at the OP's picture and see that is exactly what is happening.
 

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I’m vouching for the OP. This is crappy finish from Glock. Same issue here, the Glock29 was manufactured in April 2021, bought it in June. The nitrite finish is blotchy. I took it back to the store, they sent it back to Glock, I just got it back today and the finish is the same. The sportsman warehouse guy cleans it with CLP, sprays with oil and hands it back to me “see good as new” I’m like you dunce, I’ve already done this. When it dries out a day later it goes back to blotchy finish. He tries to tell me Glock changed their finish process and this is how they are, “the metal will absorb oil over time and look fine” he says.
I do metal work, this is a bull crap answer. I’ve seen a few like this in store cases and it’s the Glock finishing process.
Nothing you can do, just go get it cerakote theme or color of your choice. It’s not the foam!! I’ve stored several flocks in the foam cases and it doesn’t do this ding dongs !!!!
I don't know what it is about Sportmans Warehouse but they seem to have the least knowledgeable gun staff ever.

First they always have something to say even if they don't know what the hell they are talking about but they pretend to know and spread false info I've been told complete BS and every time I'm in there I hear something dumber than the last time I was in there.

I have not met even one who knows anything about guns not even an older guy who knows shotguns or bolt rifles.
 
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