Sport Pilot Rule approved!

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Texas T, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. Texas T

    Texas T TX expatriate CLM

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    FAA Administrator Marion Blakey on Tuesday released the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule in an effort to enhance the fun of aviation, help shatter cost barriers, and allow already certificated pilots to fly once again using a driver's license in lieu of a medical certificate.

    When it goes into effect on September 1, it will introduce a new level of pilot certificate and category of low-performance aircraft with takeoff weights of up to 1,320 pounds and maximum airspeeds of 120 knots. While it could take some time for the industry to fully gear up to produce new airplanes and the FAA to train pilot examiners and draft written tests, the really good news for many AOPA members is that they can be back in the air in a matter of weeks, thanks in large part to AOPA's efforts.

    "It was important to AOPA that our members who love and support general aviation, but no longer have a current medical, be able to fly again," said AOPA President Phil Boyer. "That's why we asked the FAA to make the rule effective quickly, and they responded." For more information and to read a story about an 83-year-old pilot who will be taking full advantage of the initiative, see AOPA Online.
     
  2. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    I've been waiting to see if the two place ultralights were going to be given a chance to get an N-number and airworthiness certificate.

    There's been a lot of people owning and flying the two place ships.
    Strictly speaking the two place can only be flown for instruction.

    So it looks like the FAA is going to let us get legal :)

    Personally I haven't had any passengers in my PPC.
    I've got 40+ hours in it but won't take a passenger until I'm completely satisfied with my handling of the machine.



    http://www.sportpilot.org/lsa/transitioning_ul_aircraft.html
    "All ultralights have an opportunity to obtain a N-number and airworthiness certificate to become an FAA-registered aircraft. You don't need to be the original builder. The FAA's goal is to have all ultralights that do not meet the definition of a FAR Part 103 single-seat ultralight convert to an experimental light-sport aircraft (E-LSA) by August 31, 2007.

    EAA will help guide you through the process and can help you prepare. Here are the easy steps to convert your ultralight to an experimental light sport aircraft:

    Apply for an N-Number (EAA can help)
    Prepare a weight and balance report for your aircraft (EAA can help)
    Install an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) on all two-seat airplanes (powered parachutes and weight-shift not required); single-seat is optional
    Prepare your ultralight for inspection
    Make an appointment with a FAA airworthiness inspector or a designated airworthiness representative (DAR). Check www.eaa.org or call 888/EAA-INFO (888/322-4636) to find the nearest DAR
    Have your aircraft inspected."
     

  3. flyandscuba

    flyandscuba

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    Good to see it finally went through. Hopefully, we will not see accident statistics rise dramatically in the future...
     
  4. hy5z

    hy5z

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    I saw that a few days ago and started doing some research. The first thing that caught my eye were some 2 seater lightweight amphibians. I've hiked all around the North Cascades and there are a ton of small lakes up there. What a joy it would be to take a trailer out of the garage, drive a few miles, unfold a small plane and then fly it to place that takes hours to drive to and hours more to hike. Seems like the planes are reasonably priced too- around $20K.

    One thing I couldn't figure out from my research is if it's legal to fly into these small lakes. Couldn't find any citation on the web or anything in the Revised Code of Washington.
     
  5. Guest

    Oh great! That's just what we need. An 83 year old person who can't pass a class 3 medical for his "private", but can now fly in his coffin with a "sport" license. I think that's a bad idea.
     
  6. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Flying magazine had an article with this info in it within the last 6 months or so.

    One of their columnists when out with some bush plane guys from seattle that were landing on gravel bars and such up in the hills.

    I'll keep my eye out for that issue. I'm sure its around here somewhere
     
  7. hy5z

    hy5z

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    Thanks, I'll look it up.
     
  8. flyandscuba

    flyandscuba

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    hy5z,

    Check out the Seaplane Pilots Association

    www.seaplanes.org

    We have a Water Landing Directory that is updated every year. Pick a state, and look up a lake to see if it is open or closed and who the controlling agency might be.

    The cost is $19 for members and $38 for non-members... You might as well join the organization and get the discount -- you'll alos receive the Water Flying magazine, published every two months. I'm sure there will be many future articles regarding sport plane amphibians!
     
  9. Skyhook

    Skyhook

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    I think if you checked out the various health conditions the FAA uses to disqualify pilots on this issue, you would find several that do not necessarily convert an aircraft to a coffin. Hyperbole, perhaps, SQUAK7777?
     
  10. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Chances are that 83 year old pilot can fly circles around me on my best day.:)

    There's still the bottom line rule that a pilot must follow, you will not fly if you are physically impaired.

    And like "Skyhook" said,
    I've seen a lot of guys grounded that I'd fly with in a second and a number of guys that dropped dead with 1st and 2nd class physicals in their pocket.

    That man and almost anyone else can still fly without a SP license, physical or licensed aircraft (ultralight).
    The only main thing I see the SP license does is allow you to carry a single passenger in a little faster (more expensive) aircraft.

    BTW, A couple months ago at work, a pilot had a chest pain, landed the chopper and died before he could shut down the engine. ;P
    The passengers got it shut down.
     
  11. hy5z

    hy5z

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    Good stuff! Thanks.

    I have about 8 hours of training under my belt and that was nearly a decade ago. But I'm still enamored with the whole flying thing. I spent a little more time today searching through the various manufacturers of ultralights. Some seemed highly professional... others not so much. My basic read is that the sport has a long way to go.
     
  12. Texas T

    Texas T TX expatriate CLM

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    Oldest Solo Pilot To Fly A Helicopter
    David Tyndall completed a helicopter solo flight at the age of 82, over County Kildare, Ireland on July 30, 1999. David had his first flying lesson in 1965. :)

    http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/index.asp?id=54686
     
  13. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Too bad they couldent get the gross increased 1670. That would have let the all the cessna models up to the 152 qualify. That would have put a lot of airframes into the fleet right off the bat. After all, its not like the 152 is any more difficult to stay ahead of than a J3, particularly on landing.

    It would have been a nice boost to the flight training FBO's. Their 152 would all of a sudden be worth a bunch more money. They could trade them off to sport pilots and up grade to 172's which is really a better trainer.
     
  14. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    According to what I've heard, a sport pilot certificate holder cannot self-certify if he is aware that he has a disqualifying medical condition. A pilot who knows he has diabetes, a heart problem or other problem which will cause nonissuance of a medical cannot just let his medical expire, self-certify and fly sport pilot planes. He will still be in violation.

    From the AOPA site:
    Out in the center of the California farmland between Sacramento and San Francisco sits Vacaville (that's Spanish for cow town). And at Vacaville's Nut Tree Airport (VCB), there's a man who loves aviation so much he has five hangars full of aircraft ranging from a J-3 Cub to a BT-13 Valiant to a Cessna 182 and C-47 being restored for a museum. Eighty-three-year-old Duncan Miller started flying during World War II, and he still loves to fly. Sport Pilot is going to keep him flying.

    About nine years ago, Miller needed a pacemaker. And that meant he also needed a special issuance medical certificate. That special issuance is only good for six months, and it takes the FAA four months to process each renewal. But the FAA will only allow Miller to apply for a renewal three months in advance. So for the past nine years, one month out of every six he's been unable to fly while he waits for the FAA to process his paperwork. "I'd run home every day to check my mailbox," Miller said.

    But Sport Pilot will allow Miller to fly his beloved J-3 Cub. Under the rules, if his special issuance medical certificate lapses, he can still fly exercising the privileges of a Sport Pilot certificate with a driver's license, providing that he self-certifies that he is medically fit to fly.

    And for Duncan Miller, every afternoon around 5 o'clock there's nothing more that he loves to do than fly his J-3 low and slow around the Vacaville farmland — except for Sunday after church when he opens his hangars for everyone, especially children, to come and see his aircraft.

    (End)
    I met Duncan Miller briefly at the Watsonville Airshow in May. Very nice man, can still fly with the best of them, was having fun flying his BT-13 in his WWII uniform.
     
  15. hapuna

    hapuna Trusted Member

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    ^6 You are correct Sir!!!!!!!!!!
    If you failed a medical you cannot self certify or if you have a disqualifying condition. The rule is pretty good in protecting the public which is why I think they stopped at the weight they picked also.:)
     
  16. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    You know the interesting thing about the gross weight that jsut occurred to me is this. What if cessna or piper or whoever took their existing certified two place trainer and recertified at a lower gross weight. It should be a snap to certify since it would be the same design. The newly certified planes would be highly desirable as Sport Pilot crafts cause you'd know that they could be loaded well over gross.
     
  17. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    Neither Cessna nor Piper currently make a two-place aircraft. Cessna figured out that a 152 wouldn't cost enough less than a 172 to sell very many. AFAIK, the last two-seater Piper sold was the Tomahawk, which ended its run in 1982.

    There are some others out there like Liberty and OMF (Symphony, which is a beefed-up and certified Glastar).
     
  18. skyydiver

    skyydiver Gravity Slave

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    Sweet, now Dad and I can just take turns flying and jumping (with proper NOTAMS of course)! No more payee for jumpee!