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Does anyone have the Sport license only or the private pilot's license and only excercise the Sport license privileges?
 

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Bro, having a "sport" rating is a waste. Why would someone get a private rating and only exercise the privledges of a sport rating? Spend just a tad bit more money and get the "private" rating. You'll thank yourself in the end.

"Sport" and "Recreational" ratings are a waste of time. With a sport rating, you can only be PIC (pilot in command) of "light sport aircraft", which limits you to the horsepower of an aircraft. You can't carry more than one passenger, you can't fly at night, you cant fly in Class B, C or D airspace unless you've had additional training (FAR part 61.325, can't fly above 10,000 msl, can't fly "special-VFR" (which you shouldn't fly anyway, but you MAY need to during unexpected or sudden below minimum weather conditions that may pop up). There are other restrictions and limitations that I haven't listed.

With a private rating, you can do all of the above. Horsepower endorsements are another "off-topic" thing I won't get into here.

With a "recreational rating," you can't carry more than one passenger, you must have endorsement to fly within a 50 mile radius of your airport and an endorsement to fly beyond a 50 mile radius only after more ground and flight training. You can't fly an aircraft that is certified to hold more than four occupants (Cessna 172's have seating for 4...), you can't fly an aircraft with more than one engine, with an engine with more than 180 horsepower. YOu can't fly at an altitude above 10,000 feet, you can't fly under special-vfr. If you have less than 400 flight hours as a "recreational" pilot, you must fly and log PIC time within every 180 days. Otherwise you have to get more flight training. (That's really a good idea for any pilot, but it is a restriction.)

Basically, with a "private" rating, you get more training, less restrictions to basically go anywhere you want etc... A few more hours spent to get the private rating is safer than few hours for the "sport" or "recreational" ratings.

Don't go in half-cocked, or half-azzed. Do yourself right. Get a "private" rating at minimum.
 

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There could be a very valid reason why he is after a sport license or looking to fly sport a/c. Perhaps medical reasons. Perhaps to buy a brand new, certified a/c for less then $100,000. Perhaps to find out whether or not to pursue getting a private license. The sport license is a great way for a first time pilot to decide whether or not to invest more time into getting a private license. Yes there is more hours required for a private pilot and you will gain more experience, but that also translates into more money spent and a longer timeframe for training. Some people appreciate this.
The limitations for the sport license are not nearly as big/important as they are made out to be.

1. There is NO HORSEPOWER LIMIT that I am aware of. If there is, please provide a link that supports it.
2. Getting an endorsement to fly into B,C,D airspace should not be difficult for any pilot to obtain.
3. Very few VFR/GA pilots are ever above 10,000ft (the fun is flying low-not high).
4. There is also no limit as to how far an individual can fly with a sport license.
In short, there are many valid reasons why an individual would want a sport license. A rating to fly, regardless of what it is, is never a waste of time.

Go for it and have fun.

Originally posted by Sturmgewehr44
Bro, don't waste your time getting a "sport" rating. Spend just a tad bit more money and get the "private" rating. You'll thank yourself in the end.

"Sport" and "Recreational" ratings are a waste of time. With a sport rating, you can only be PIC (pilot in command) of "light sport aircraft", which limits you to the horsepower of an aircraft. You can't carry more than one passenger, you can't fly at night, you cant fly in Class B, C or D airspace unless you've had additional training (FAR part 61.325, can't fly above 10,000 msl, can't fly "special-VFR" (which you shouldn't fly anyway, but you MAY need to during unexpected or sudden below minimum weather conditions that may pop up). There are other restrictions and limitations that I haven't listed.

With a private rating, you can do all of the above. Horsepower endorsements are another "off-topic" thing I won't get into here.

With a "recreational rating," you can't carry more than one passenger, you must have endorsement to fly within a 50 mile radius of your airport and an endorsement to fly beyond a 50 mile radius only after more ground and flight training. You can't fly an aircraft that is certified to hold more than four occupants (Cessna 172's have seating for 4...), you can't fly an aircraft with more than one engine, with an engine with more than 180 horsepower. YOu can't fly at an altitude above 10,000 feet, you can't fly under special-vfr. If you have less than 400 flight hours as a "recreational" pilot, you must fly and log PIC time within every 180 days. Otherwise you have to get more flight training. (That's really a good idea for any pilot, but it is a restriction.)

Basically, with a "private" rating, you get more training, less restrictions to basically go anywhere you want etc... A few more hours spent to get the private rating is safer than few hours for the "sport" or "recreational" ratings.

Don't go in half-cocked, or half-*****ed. Do yourself right. Get a "private" rating at minimum.
 

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Yes, I did make a mistake. For a "sport" rating there is no horsepower requirement. There is one for "recreation" ratings. That said, here are the limitations for a "sport" rating:

A sport pilot may:

Share the operating expenses of a flight with a passenger, provided the expenses involve only fuel, oil, airport expenses, or aircraft rental fees. A sport pilot must pay at least half the operating expenses of the flight.
A sport may not act as pilot in command of a light sport aircraft:
That is carrying a passenger or property for compensation or hire.
For compensation or hire.
In furtherance of a business.
While carrying more than one passenger.
At night.
In Class A airspace.
In Class B, C, or D airspace, at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace, and to, from, through, or at an airport having an operational control tower unless you have received ground and flight training and a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor in accordance with 61.325 certifying you are authorized to exercise these privileges.
Outside the United States, unless you have prior authorization from the country in which you seek to operate. A sport pilot certificate carries the limitation "Holder does not meet ICAO requirements."
In a passenger-carrying airlift sponsored by a charitable organization.
At an altitude of more than 10,000 feet msl.
When the flight or surface visibility is less than 3 statute miles.
Without visual reference to the surface.
If the aircraft has a maximum forward speed in level flight that exceeds 87 knots CAS, unless having met the requirements of 61.327.
Contrary to any operating limitation placed on the airworthiness certificate of the aircraft being flown.
Contrary to any limitation or endorsement on your pilot certificate, airman medical certificate, U.S. driver's license, or any other limitation or logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor.
Contrary to any restriction or limitation on the sport pilot's U.S. driver's license or any restriction or limitation imposed by judicial or administrative order when using a driver's license to satisfy the requirements of Part 61.
While towing any object.
As a pilot flight crewmember on any aircraft for which more than one pilot is required by the type certificate of the aircraft or the regulations under which the flight is conducted.
What types of airplanes can I fly?

There are currently more than 21,000 certified airplanes in the standard airworthiness category from seven manufacturers that qualify as light sport aircraft. Standard category airplanes you can fly include, but are not limited to:

Piper J-2 and J-3
Aeronca Champ
Luscombe 8, 8A, 8B, and 8C
Taylorcraft BC, BCS, and BC-65
Ercoupe 415C and 415 CD
(source: AOPA web site)

Now, you tell me where the average Joe can go to a local airport and rent one of these above listed airplanes???? Most schools use 172's, 150's, 152's and/or piper warriors etc.....

Plus, with a sport pilot rating, one only needs 20 hours or so to get the rating. Tell me that's a safe thing to do, I don't think so. The private requires 35 (part 141) or 40hrs (part 61) as memory serves me right. For the majority of people, that's not even enough to be a safe and competent pilot.

I think if a person wants to explore piloting, then he/she should take a few flight (5 hours or so) and make a decision as to whay type of safe training he/she wants. 40hrs vs. 20hrs of instruction? Hmmmm,,,I know what I'd want my own loved ones to go through and it wouldn't be a "sport" rating.

Remember, you get what you pay for.
 

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I'll give you an example...

I've always wanted to fly. I love aircraft. However, I have a medical condition which would almost certainly not allow me to pass the medical for a private pilot license. I understand they make exceptions on occasions and I'm virtually certain my doctor would sign off on the idea of me flying, but he obviously isn't the FAA. That said, I'm very aware of my limitations, my health and the fact that my health condition would never cause an accute health crisis like a heart attack or a diabetic situation (both of which they will make exceptions for).

So I'm stuck. I can either go through the FAA and fight for an exception with the possibility that I will never, ever be able to fly or get a sports license and fly with the awareness that I am responsible for my health.

I agree with you that some of the aircraft are lightly built, but others appear to be quite well built. I also agree that the training appears to be pretty light-weight, but if you look at something like standard CCW training, that too is pretty basic. Both are the bare minimum training and, I would hope, in both cases, people seek more information and training.
 

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Originally posted by jgamble
...I would hope...people seek more information and training.
I'll drink to that. :beer: :supergrin: :beer: :beer: :beer:
 

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Just another general point to add about the medical...

If your FAA medical is denied, you CANNOT fly (or should I say act as PIC) under your driver's license as a Sport Pilot, you would need to get the medical issue straightened out with the FAA docs in OKC first.
 

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3. Very few VFR/GA pilots are ever above 10,000ft (the fun is flying low-not high).
Depends on what state you live in. Out here in the west in places, that just doesn't "fly". A lot of valleys and plateus are around 5-6000. Some plateus are 8000-9000. We go over 10 all the time.

On the other hand, in some states that have a lot of low terrain, you rarely go over 10,000. My buddy from Oklahoma said it was his first time ever going "that high" when we did a little flight around here. He has his private liscense, but never has much reason to go above 7000-8000 at the highest.
 

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Originally posted by cyriaque
Does anyone have the Sport license only or the private pilot's license and only excercise the Sport license privileges?
I'm flying as a Sport Pilot with a Commercial license. Not even as a Sport Pilot at present, but as a Ultralight pilot.

After retiring I didn't have enough interest in flying to buy/rent a plane or helicopter or renew my physical, but did end up buying a PPC (powered parachute, ultralight) just for something interesting to fly solo. Then I bought a Ultralight plane for the same reason.

The PPC is a 2 place and as I understand the new regs I can get a Airworthiness on it which will put it in the sport category allowing me to carry a passenger (which is illegal now).
So, again as I understand the regs, I can fly Sport Pilot carrying a single passenger, without renewing my physical.

The Sport Pilot setup does have some uses but I'm not sure that such a low time pilot being able to legal carry a passenger is a good idea.

I to think, in most cases, if someone was going for a Sport Pilot license they may as well get their private and be done with it.
 

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Originally posted by jgamble
I'll give you an example...

I've always wanted to fly. I love aircraft. However, I have a medical condition which would almost certainly not allow me to pass the medical for a private pilot license.
Another option, if just fun flying is your goal, is Ultralights. No license for you or the aircraft and no physical.
No passengers either though.:)
 

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Originally posted by M2 Carbine
Another option, if just fun flying is your goal, is Ultralights. No license for you or the aircraft and no physical.
No passengers either though.:)
Ultralights look cool, but I sort of like the idea of having plenty of metal around me as well. I'm not really sure - I've got many things to accomplish before I can devote the time needed to this, so I've got a bit until I need to decide.
 

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If you have a disqualifying medical condition, you cannot act as PIC under a Sport Pilot certificate. It doesn't matter that a medical certificate isn't required; disqualifying medical conditions still prohibit flying. Well, you can fly, but cannot act as pilot in command, which means that a rated pilot will have to be at the controls as well.
 
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