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Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by sushi600, Mar 3, 2004.

  1. sushi600

    sushi600 What smells?

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    Wondering how many people have gotten themselves into spins (both intentionally and unintentionally).

    How many of you did spin recovery (during PP training)? I personally feel "lacking" in that I never went through an "actual" spin recovery -- and in the back of my mind I keep wondering if I would handle it properly if I ever got myself into one.
     
  2. 40Cal

    40Cal Modurbator

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    I've never been in one either and I have the same thoughts. I thought I'd do it in my commercial training but didn't. I'd like to think I'd know what to do from reading the procedure but you never know until it happens.
     

  3. sushi600

    sushi600 What smells?

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    I feel the same way... I would like to believe I would be able to get out of it based on textbook knowledge, but don't know if I will be able to cut the mustard.

    Not too familiar with acrobatic flight, but do they go into intentional spins and other stuff? I would love to get into as many "bad" situations as possible in a controlled environment, and I figure a few rides with an acro-pilot would do me good (assuming it's not THAT expensive...).
     
  4. FB3

    FB3

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    No matter how much you read and brief, your first several spins will probably be somewhat traumatic. My first one was instructional back in 1966, and it was a little scary. Since then, I have been in quite a few spins, mostly intentional, and it is not a big deal to recover IF you have enough altitude and use the correct procedures.

    All unintentional spins that I have experienced were at high altitude in aerobatic aircraft, and were caused by improper control inputs in very high angle of attack and attitude maneuvers. A well developed spin in some high performance aerobatic aircraft can get one in trouble due to the fact that it is easy to transition from erect to inverted with very little difference in visual cues, therefore accelerating the spin if the improper recovery is used. The high rate of rotation can be very disorienting.

    I can't recommend strongly enough that every pilot get spin training with a qualified pilot in an aircraft that is certified for spins. This will be time and money well spent and may save your life someday. Once you experience a few spins, they will not be intimidating or frightening, and will really reinforce the reason for proper flying techniques in the pattern.
     
  5. Timotheous46

    Timotheous46

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    When I was going for my commercial, my instructor noticed that I hadn’t done any spins. He informed me that the next day we would take his airplane up instead of mine.

    I still remember the sight of the farmhouse spinning in the windshield on my first spin.;G I’m sure that there are still slight imprints where I gripped the seat and airframe in a general mood of extreme panic. But he got me going into and OUT of spins by the time the flight was over. ;a

    Tim
     
  6. Skyhook

    Skyhook

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    Before soloing I had to demonstrate R & L spin recovery techniques in the J-3. Imagine that with a pre-solo time (total) of 6.5 hrs.

    My last spin was in the RV-4 with my wife in the back.. I was messing about with flattening out the top of the loops when the little red thing stalled inverted and spun. No biggie in the -4, but I have flown some that were not known to fly themselves out of such maneuvers.
     
  7. JonnyB

    JonnyB Millennium Member

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    Didn't do any in my initial training, but did after. Used a Citabria for initial training as well as spins. They're a hoot, if your stomach can stand it. I had to quit after a half-hour or so.

    We did them left and right. Then from left into a right (or right to left - it's been ten years, pert-near). Then, for additional fun, the "falling leaf", where you stall the aircraft, but use the rudder to keep it from spinning. Hold the stick back, keeping it from recovering, and just 'walk' it down. It feels and looks like a falling leaf. Don't look at the VSI, though, and DON'T do it without a lot of air beneath you!

    JB
     
  8. sopdan

    sopdan

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    I haven't yet, but by the time I'm done with my training I will have done spins in an Extra 300 and most likely the 172, as well... I can't wait for the Extra. :)
     
  9. 40Cal

    40Cal Modurbator

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    What kind of training are you taking?
     
  10. Skyhook

    Skyhook

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    Whut 40Cal said... That Extra 300 stuff isn't in most student's itinerary..;P
    (Wished it was in mine, tho.)
     
  11. sopdan

    sopdan

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    I'm at WMU... it's part of our curriculum. We actually have two Extras
     
  12. myounger

    myounger HrdHatDivr

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    It was an option when I was a student, 1980. Right place at the right time. We had an old work horse of a 150 that was going in for a major "0" time and new avonics. Owner and my CFI said lets go do spins. Spins left, spins right, we did a whole bunch of them.
    Man, was that fun.
    Spun the guts out of the gyro! But the old 150 never flinched.
    Those first two or three scared the hell out of me!
    Never got to do any since then, sure not in the "new" 150!
    Every pilot should do a couple with a good CFI.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Regards, Mike
     
  13. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    In 1960 did spins when I was a student, in a Piper Colt, my Aeronca and later a Stinson.

    When I was instructing in the mid 60's we did spins all the time.
    We took all the gyros out of a C172 and strapped a case of oil behind the rear seat. Without the oil the old bird wouldn't stay in the spin.


    The funniest spin I was in was with a friend who was trying to pay me back for things I had done to him during our flying in my Stinson.

    He rented a C150 Aerobat (I think they were called).
    We put on chutes and he was going to take me for a ride.
    Level at a few thousand feet I noticed him sneaking the A/S back to maneuvering speed as he was talking.

    When he hit M/S he yanked the wheel back and stood on the right pedal.
    His seat broke loose and he slid back into the baggage compartment, still hanging on to the wheel. (he was 6'2").


    We were doing snap rolls from hell as the plane nosed over still spinning, passing through about 2,000 feet.

    I kept yelling, Get off the ******* controls.

    He kept yelling, Can you land it? (I hadn't flown a Cessna then)

    I said, Ya,if you get off the ******* controls.

    He finally let go and I got us out of the spin and I landed.

    I wouldn't let him live down that trick for years.;f
     
  14. Skyhook

    Skyhook

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    ;P

    Some Cessna seats were prone to letting the occupant flop around w/o warning.. Never had it happen to me, though.
     
  15. 40Cal

    40Cal Modurbator

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    Oh man, now you've gone and done it. ;P

    I'm gonna make it easy for you though,
    just knock on your screen right here
    [​IMG]
     
  16. aircarver

    aircarver Descent Terminated Silver Member

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    I had a Cessna (172) seat runaway at rotation for takeoff. Envisioning 'bad things' if I held on to the controls, I let go as i zinged back into the back seat. Fortunately. it was an instrument practice flight and my check pilot, who was dozing, grabbed it when I yelled at him to take it. The Cessna managed to fly away 'hands off' very well during the seconds nobody was in charge.... ;Q
     
  17. SlimlineGlock

    SlimlineGlock

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    I had a Cessna 337 seat zing back on me during takeoff roll. I was solo.

    A quick unsnap of the seat belt and a crouch on the floor to continue the takeoff. Lots of fun!
     
  18. Skyhook

    Skyhook

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    40Cal, thanks for the wood.. (gee, hasn't my wife said something like that?).
    Anyhow, as one can see, those Cessna seats have had some anti-boring engineered into them!;f
     
  19. PersonalFirepower

    PersonalFirepower

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    About 6 weeks ago, I was out on a solo practice flight in a Cessna 152, just me by my lonesome. I climbed to 3000ft and started doing some power off stall practice. The first one was a little wimpy so the next time, I pulled back harder on the yoke. Stall warning is blaring, but the plane kind of floated there, not climbing any more, but not stalling. All of a sudden, the nose drops like a rock, and to make matters worse, the left wing drops down as well toward the ground.

    "Holy SH#@!!!!"

    What the hell just happened? I haven't been here before!

    I did nearly a full turn pointing straight down at the ground, and as this was happening, I was instinctively applying right rudder. After the aircraft straightened out, I appled back pressure and clmbed out of the dive. All this time I am saying to myself "Simon, if you don't get yourself out of this, you are going to die". Needless to say, I am still here to write this post!

    What was scary about the whole thing was that my instructor had never showed me what a spin was, lest even what a recovery should look like. Fortunately, I had read about spin recovery a few days earlier and must have applied what I had read about to recover. When I talked to her about it later, she said that she was happy that I recovered, but not to worry as a spin can quite easily happen in a 152.

    The next week, we went up and did about 6 spins just to become comfortable with them. And after that session, I am comfortable. I do think that spin training should be mandatory!

    Cheers,
     
  20. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    PersonalFirepower,

    This is what happens when a pilot doesn't understand what makes a wing fly, stall and spin.

    The pilot was a CFI in FW and helicopters but he just didn't understand how the wing stalled when the engine was at full power.

    BTW, if you haven't read it, get the book "Stick and Rudder" by Wolfgang Langewiesche. It's a good read.

    [​IMG]