Special training leading up to a match.

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by Fumble, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. Fumble

    Fumble RIP Poom . . .

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    In two week the Oakdale (MN) will take place. As a lead up to the match can anyone offer some training tips for that last two weeks? I am on my department’s shooting team so I do practice regularly the shooting skills. I have shot GSSF for several years so I know what to expect. I guess what I’m asking is what do others do special (if anything) leading up to a match?
     
  2. cmzneb

    cmzneb

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    I try to practice alot of 20-25 yard shots on a D-1 target. Makes all the others seem easy. ;f

    Also use paper plates hung on a target board to simulate the plate rack.
     

  3. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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    Set up as much of the match as you can and shoot 500 to 1000 rounds the Saturday before the match. Seriously this type of intensive shooting/training has served me, and others very well.
     
  4. GLW

    GLW

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    I certainly wont dispute what Jerry says about rounds down range. I'm trying to increase my round count too. However, time and available practice ammo don't always allow that. Being ADD (according to my wife) I start to loose focus after a couple of hundred rounds anyway. What I do to compensate is to make every round as much like the actual match as possible. The closer I get to race day, I try and duplicate match conditions so that the actual match will feel like another day at the practice range. This includes wearing the same clothes, packing my range bag the same way, etc, etc. Make sure you fire each round with the same intensity as you would if you were shooting the match. Never be satisfied, always look for ways to improve. Hope this helps. Let me know if it does. See you on the range. Grady
     
  5. SocomCen

    SocomCen Millennium Member

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    As a new master GSSF shooter and a very active competitive shooter in IDPA & USPSA (and now ICORE) I suggest working on these things and also remember the basic shooting fundamentals.

    Master your grip and stance. Your hold and grip on the pistol for a right handed shooter should be 60% left hand and 40% from the right. Make sure the gun will not shift in your hand. Get the pistol as low in your hand as possible for best control. Use grip tape (skateboard tape) and Pro Grip. Pro Grip is a spray or gel that you put on your hands and it dries all the oils out of your hands but isn't harsh on your skin. I use a 'modified' Isosceles stance. GSSF always starts at a low ready so you're at an advantage with grip, there's no reason why you should have a poor grip on the pistol nor a bad stance. You don't have to take a high speed class or anything to learn these, if you know any really good IDPA/USPSA shooters ask! Most shooters are more than willing to help you out, including me.

    Next for plates practice on 6" paper plates at 11yds, know where your gun hits at 11yds. I did poorly at Jackson NJ (in AmSub) with a G26 because I had switched ammo without learning where the gun hits, which made the G26 hit about 3-4" low. I used S&B ammo in both the G17 and G26, but all my practice had been with Atlanta Arms Ammunition (factory reloads). The ammo change in the G17 didn't matter as much and I placed 1st in AmCiv and Competition. My fellow teammate Travis Haley placed 1st in AmSub at this same match using my G26 but with his ammo (Win White box). If you can consistantly hit a 6" plate at 11yds, hitting an 8" plate will be very easy.

    Next practice shooting at a D1/IPSC/IDPA target at 25yds. Practice outdoors as much as possible. I don't get much practice at outdoor ranges but do at indoor ranges. I can tell because of the poor lighting at indoor ranges that I don't shoot to my full potential.
    You should shoot no more than 150 rounds per practice session. If you shoot more than that more than likely you will just be getting tired and reinforcing bad shooting habits. At each shooting session have a goal to work on be it working on plates, distance, transition speed between targets etc. Also don't shoot fast enough that you cannot see the pistol sights coming back to the target after recoil, each shot should have it's own sight picture.

    Here's how I shoot the stages.
    Plates = I'm right handed and left eyed. I shoot the plates from the left to the right. If I miss a plate I move to the next plate then go back to the missed plate (if you're shooting the paper option you can't take an extra shot). On the paper option go slow enough to make good shots. As fellow team member (Bernie Rhee, Joe Mamma here) has said "you have nothing to gain and everything to loose on the plates".


    Glock-M = 1st string, from the left, paper, steel, paper, paper, paper.
    2nd string, from the left, paper, paper, steel, paper, paper.
    3rd string, front the left, paper, paper, paper, steel, paper.
    On the closet targets I speed up my pace. If you're uncomfortable doing that don't you'll likely make a bad hit which unless your overall times are fast isn't worth the price you'll pay in penalty time.

    5-to-Glock = I shoot this stage from right to left. On the first target (10yds). I shoot at a moderate pace. At the next (20yds), I slow a little down, slow way down at the 3rd (25yds) shoot this target like you have all the time in the world and make sure you have good trigger control, I go a little quicker on the the 4th (15yd) target and then I hammer the two shots on the 5th and final (5yds) target.

    I've tried all ways of shooting these stages and the way I do it works best for me YMMV. Practice, Practice, Practice and most of all HAVE FUN!!!

    See you at the range,
    Robb Jensen
     
  6. Speedrock

    Speedrock "To The Point"

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    "...start to loose focus after a couple of hundred rounds anyway. What I do to compensate is to make every round as much like the actual match as possible. The closer I get to race day, I try and duplicate match conditions so that the actual match will feel like another day at the practice range."

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "...shoot no more than 150 rounds per practice session. If you shoot more than that more than likely you will just be getting tired and reinforcing bad shooting habits. At each shooting session have a goal to work on be it working on plates, distance, transition speed between targets etc. Also don't shoot fast enough that you cannot see the pistol sights coming back to the target after recoil, each shot should have it's own sight picture."


    Great, solid advice here...

    Don't get to travel to many GSSF Matches but do shoot 3 weekend IDPA or other similar mathes a month. Use the same build-up strategy for them but to keep "on your game" not increas the excitement or tension of a favored once per yr. match that's right around the corner.

    Find sometimes 50 rounds per session is enough {personally} before focus or accuracy begins to fall off, sometimes more than 200 but always set 200 as absolute max. {would rather shoot 150 every other day rather than 500 one day and not shoot for a full week, etc.}

    It's good to vizualize the Stages in your mind both at the range and when there is a spare moment at work or home. Can help save a good bit of mental energy at the Match for use on things you can't prepare for or forsee, etc.
     
  7. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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    Since the average GSSF match takes at least 81 rounds wouldn't you like to increase your stamina and ability to concentrate? Do you shoot more than one category at the matches? Do you always shoot just to your limit?

    Everybody needs to work out their own practice regimen, do what works for you. No one can argue with Grady's performance, then again I don't see any room for criticism for Bobby Carver either. Bobby practices long and hard, stamina at a match is very important. :)

    Speedrock's practice regimen is exactly what I did, and I improved. Then I started the more intensive sessions, like TJC advise me, and I started to win. What is working for Speedrock, didn't work for me, at least not to get me to the level I wanted to shoot at. ;)
     
  8. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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  9. DaleGribble

    DaleGribble Sandwich!

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    I tend to agree with the Fireglock theory of practice.

    I shoot five or six categories at a match and I find that longer practice sessions help prepare me for that because I work on maintaining my focus, which is absolutely vital for good performance at a match.
     
  10. BCarver

    BCarver CLM Millennium Member

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    Everyone has their personal techniques and stategies when it comes to preparation practice before a match. All of the comments and suggestions offered above are good and have worked for the competitors that have shared their experiences.

    Like FireGlock stated, I believe in building stamina so that you can perform to your peak of your ability at a match. Like a runner who builds stamina, you should start with a short distance and strive to increase your distance. In other words, if you feel tired and lose focus after 50 to 100 rounds, try shooting another 25 rounds until you continue to feel focused and on target and then move on.

    I have found that the best method to use when gauging your focus and stamina is to occassionally, during your practice session, shoot a group of shots at a specific spot on a 25 yard target or farther. Whenever you find that your group begins to get bigger, it's time to leave and come back again someday. Why? Because you are tired and not gripping your Glock the same or you have lost focus. A friend of mine, Jerry Barnhart, one of the "best" IPSC competitors since its origin, stated in one of his books, "always leave a practice session, wanting to shoot more". That makes sense to me.

    Each practice session should be productive and not just time spent shooting. I agree, having an objective to achieve during a practice session is important.

    Please keep in mind, if you are shooting only one entry at a GSSF match, you will shoot a minimum of 81 rounds. If you are shooting 2 entries, then you'll shoot a minimum of 162 rounds, shooting 3 entries, you'll shoot a minimum of 243 rounds. This will be done over the period of 2-3 hours or longer, depending upon the waits. In order to manage the same grip, stance and trigger control on the last stage of fire as the first stage of fire, you will need to have experience with longer periods of shooting or stamina.

    Shooting IDPA, IPSC and other disciplines will improve your GSSF performances as long as you remember that GSSF scoring puts more emphasis on accuracy. Of course you will want to shoot as fast as possible but the misses will effect you more than taking more time to score a hit.

    When you practice, picture yourself on the line at the GSSF match, hearing the commands and seeing the targets as you will see them at the match. (Setting up each COF is very beneficial when possible) Practice like you will shoot at the match. I measure my performance by the "first" run through any COF. This could be called cold shooting. During practice, this run should give you an idea on what your performance "could" be at a match. Whenever you get on the line at the match, close your eyes for a moment when you are told to take a sight picture, focus upon the ease and comfort that you feel when practicing on your range and when you open your eyes, try to imagine you are at your range practicing.

    Good luck in your next match and let us all know how you do.

    See ya at the range,
    Bobby Carver
     
  11. GLW

    GLW

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    I just wanted to clarify one point, I certainly do not disagree with Jerry's advise about more rounds being good. As I said in my first reply, I'm trying to increase my round count too. I just never seem to have enough time and bullets at the same practice session!! My suggestion was for those who share my problem. I agree that stamina is vitally important. I suffered from a lack of it in Indy where the heat sapped you even faster. My legs were weak during my runs on the plates and my focus was on getting finished rather than on the sights and trigger control. So I am in agreement with you and will take your advise and find the time and ammo to shoot more. Thanks teammate! :) Look forward to seeing you at the range.
     
  12. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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    Grady however you practice sure seems to work for you! ;f
     
  13. Custom Glock Racing

    Custom Glock Racing I did it first. Millennium Member

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    I just setup the stages and shoot 500-1000 rounds per stage before a match.