Speaking of Chestnuts....

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by OV1kenobi, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. OV1kenobi

    OV1kenobi

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    Do they still sell those little, brown paper bags of roasted chestnuts on the street corners of places like NYC, Detroit, etc. during the Christmas season?

    You know, the ones roasted over an open fire, with Jack Frost nipping at your nose?

    I remember buying them in downtown Detroit in the 1960s when I was a kid.

    I have resided in Tulsa, OK for the past thirty years.

    I have never seen them here.

    One of those pleasures that I miss, and haven’t had any for years upon years.

    At least forty to fifty years.

    Thanks, Clancy, for the reminder!
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2019
  2. peng

    peng

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    I was just at Belle Isle / Campus Martius a few days ago. Didn't see them.

    Didn't see any street vendors actually. Still a sad place with a few areas of good money thrown after bad revival...
     
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  3. OV1kenobi

    OV1kenobi

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    I totally catch your meaning.
     
  4. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    image.jpg

    I seldom see them here so I roast my own. I’m the only one in the family who likes them so I do a small batch every year.
     
  5. OV1kenobi

    OV1kenobi

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    If you don’t mind sharing, where do you get your chestnuts, and how do you go about roasting them?
     
  6. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    I buy from Harmon’s, a local Utah grocery chain. I cut an X through the hull at the base to let steam out then roast them in the pan with the holes in it. I roast over a gas stove on high but I hold the pan about 4-6 inches above the flames until the hull is cracked and looks easy to peel.
     
  7. Green Dragoon

    Green Dragoon Silver Member

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    I have chestnut trees on my land. I’m told they aren’t the edible kind though. I guess they’re called horse chestnuts.
     
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  8. briarpatch

    briarpatch

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    I cut them and put in the microwave for about a minute.
    They take off in a fast spin when the steam escapes.
     
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  9. 308M1A

    308M1A

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    I was of the understanding a lot of chestnut trees were wiped out by some blight and figured theyre rare and/or expensive if available at all.
     
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  10. BradD

    BradD

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    Those were the American chestnuts. Unbelievable ecological tragedy.

    The ones available today are Chinese chestnuts. They are only moderately expensive.
     
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  11. LostinTexas

    LostinTexas Exploring Alternate Routes

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    I heard this as well. Never had chestnuts and figure I missed my chance. Maybe some day.

    Looked them up. Only $20 a pound on the evil Amazon. What a deal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2019
  12. rj1939

    rj1939

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    Castanea dentata, American chestnuts fell victim to blight brought in from Japan or China in the early 1900's (maybe before) It ended up killing 4 billion trees. There are some survivors, outside the normal range that they occupied.
    The oriental chestnuts don't have the timber form that Americans did, so aren't a source of lumber. American chestnuts were highly rot resistant.
    A transgenetic American chestnut has been introduced, with a few genes from wheat, that enable it to neutralize the acid produced by the blight, that is the cause damage under the bark. It is in trials now, and if it is approved, will be released for re-introduction.
     
  13. Green Dragoon

    Green Dragoon Silver Member

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    what kind of chestnut trees do I have on my property in Connecticut that drops "horse" chestnuts?
     
  14. BradD

    BradD

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    I read somewhere that when the blight was taking off, a huge number of healthy chestnut trees were harvested to get the wood while it was available. The author was saying that probably eliminated trees that had blight resistance, which went a long way toward the near-extinction of the species.

    I was thinking it's too bad ecological concerns are dishonestly used by the Left to take away freedom, because these issues really are important to all of us. It would be great if we could trust the people who spend a lot of time thinking about this stuff.
     
  15. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Nope, strictly bags like this now:
    [​IMG]

    City people doin' city people stuff.
     
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  16. DirectDrive

    DirectDrive

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    That's a different tree/chestnut.
    We had Horse Chestnut trees around when we were growing up in the East.
    My grandfather was the only one who knew of the American chestnut.
    Sadly, we only knew of it in his stories.

    From pictures, it looks like the Horse Chestnut is 5-6 times or more, larger than an American Chestnut.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019
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  17. Dr. Leaky

    Dr. Leaky Know-It-All

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    Never had one and likely never will.
     
  18. pizzaaguy

    pizzaaguy

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    In the past, the chestnuts I've bought in the supermarket were from Italy.
     
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  19. cougar_ml

    cougar_ml

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    My dad planted many acres of them on our land when I was young. Most of them didn't take, but we have a couple dozen mature trees that all produced this year (normally maybe a dozen of the trees produce well, but they were stressed this year and many more produced)
    Currently the veggie drawer in my fridge is full of them because my father ran out of space in his.

    They're not bad, but one of those foods like crab that I consider to be too much work for the reward.
     
  20. rj1939

    rj1939

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    Over a hundred years ago, 25% of the trees in Appalachia, were American chestnuts, 25% of the Appalachian forest disappeared. 4 billion trees.

    There has been a massive effort to replace the lost trees, by breeding the Japanese and Chinese resistance into the dentata's, unfortunately, to get enough resistance into them, they lose too much of the AC characteristics and are no longer a timber style tree and cannot compete against other trees in a forest setting.
    There has been some success with hypovirulence, treating the native trees with a hypovirulent strain of blight to increase resistance.................I believe Europe has had considerable success with that, but we have a little different situation.
    Darling 58, is the transgenetic designation, now it is called Darling, since it is now a cultivar. It shows more resistance than Chinese varieties, so it can be crossed with the native survivors and will be able to pass enough resistance to protect the new hybrid. So the species will have significant diversity, as in the past.