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Venor ergo sum
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+1 for federal LEO from a retired FED. The pay and benefits are generally better and pension isn't too shabby either.
 

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23+ and retired last December. I would say, if he thinks it’s his calling, get to it and be the best cop he can be. Remind him that no matter where you are in the career you’re one injury, bad day, weird political incident away from not being a cop any more, so he should have a backup plan with a capital B. Disillusionment can set in just about anytime, and will probably wax and wane over a career. He probably will come out of it damaged goods to one degree or another. I can’t remember how many times I wanted to say “[email protected]#k it” over 23 years, but there were a bunch. Got worse after I promoted to commander and chief.

Still and all though, we desperately need good cops. It’s gotten to hard for most to do 30-40 years anymore, so turnover is higher. If he really wants to do it you won’t be able to talk him out of it anyway, and I’m not sure you should if he’s suited for it.

Just remind him, again: Go into it with eyes open and have a plan to get out of it immediately should he so desire.
 

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Retired after 34.5 years. My brother has a few years to go. My son and nephews are in their first 5 and going strong. I believe law enforcement service is not simply a job, but a career calling. I, as a first generation L.E.O. for my family, am proud to have served and would make the same choice even today. Ironically, in today's social climate it would not be my first choice of career path for my son or nephews. However, it is their choice to make and I proudly stand behind them.
 

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I’m close to 34, and should be done about the time Donnie finishes his next term. Sooner if possible. Everything I once thought was true is now like Opposite Day. I’ve often thought about what I would have done, if I had to do it again. I got nothing. But, at least I had the chance to learn how to investigate etc. I’ve got to see justice occasionally served. But it takes it’s toll on you in too many ways. I’ve also got a son that’s 25. I’m thankful every day, that he graduated with a degree in computer science. I’m waiting for the next one to get done with college, and I’m out. Anything for them but any type of LE. And the feds is still a pipe dream for many, and not at all what it’s cracked up to be. Maybe some better retirement benefits? LE these days is as much of a risk, as being military during wartime, IMO. Unfortunately it is wartime currently for LE. So I also say, hell no! Be safe.


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If your son truly wants to do it then he should do it with his eyes wide open and have a backup plan for when he wants to leave, whether that’s 5 years in or 25 years in.

In today’s environment though with how hyper charged everything is he can literally do everything right and end up with everything wrecked With no career and half the country hating you (ie Ferguson, MO).

I do second those who are saying to go Federal. Though if he doesn’t want to move around as much I’d say a state agency isn’t a bad gig either though the pay isn’t as good as even some local departments. A state bureau of investigation is good.
 

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We need the THIN. BLUE LINE, be it any color like Green, Tan or what ever. Many people say little good about the Cops, or Profession. Those are those doing crime.

Honorable Profession.
 

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23+ and retired last December. I would say, if he thinks it’s his calling, get to it and be the best cop he can be. Remind him that no matter where you are in the career you’re one injury, bad day, weird political incident away from not being a cop any more, so he should have a backup plan with a capital B. Disillusionment can set in just about anytime, and will probably wax and wane over a career. He probably will come out of it damaged goods to one degree or another. I can’t remember how many times I wanted to say “[email protected]#k it” over 23 years, but there were a bunch. Got worse after I promoted to commander and chief.

Still and all though, we desperately need good cops. It’s gotten to hard for most to do 30-40 years anymore, so turnover is higher. If he really wants to do it you won’t be able to talk him out of it anyway, and I’m not sure you should if he’s suited for it.

Just remind him, again: Go into it with eyes open and have a plan to get out of it immediately should he so desire.
Solid advice. I have trade skills and an engineering degree but LE is always what I wanted to do. I have backups but this is just something that I can always see myself doing.

You will find yourself hating it one time or another but it is what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
We need the THIN. BLUE LINE, be it any color like Green, Tan or what ever. Many people say little good about the Cops, or Profession. Those are those doing crime.

Honorable Profession.
Absolutely it is! Does that mean I want my son out there in the midst of the insanity going on? That’s a more difficult question to answer. He’s strong-willed and a grown man(even though he’ll always be my little boy), so I can’t and won’t talk him into or out of it. I agree with an earlier post-is it his calling or just something he thought of? Definitely something I will ask him when we talk in a couple of days-he had all 4 wisdom teeth out this evening, so he won’t be doing much talking for a couple of days.
 

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I'd try to talk my son or daughter out of a law enforcement job.
 

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Many years ago I met a retired NYPD Officer, he had been shot twice on job. Was officer of year for one of the five NYC Burro's. Super cop on NYPD. Highly decorate for heroism.

His son was in LASD Acadamy as recruit for agency that sent their rookies to that academy.

Father was not happy with sons career choice as he had a BS from Fordham University.

I told the father I understood his fear as son was going into dangerous profession. My take was you talked with son. He wants to follow his dream, and be like you.

He graduated academy, became super cop. Gave first agency 40 years risking to Captain. Retired now work for Agency number two.

Super Cop like father, decorated, etc.

Kid followed his dream that stated in 1979 I believe, when the young recruit was my neighbor.
 

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And I’m not real sure how to advise him. He’s 25 with a college degree, and is the GM of an indoor baseball facility(he played college ball).
My dad was a county sheriff for years, and I condsidered LE, but I wanted to coach, and part of me is proud of him for wanting to serve. The other part of me sees how you guys are under attack socially and politically and wants to warn him against it. What do you guys who are in the field now think?
LE is/was a noble profession. I got into it to stop bad guys and I did my share (should have done more) but sent several away to prison. Left Patrol in 99 and left LE completely in 09. I consider myself fortunate to have the opportunity and to make decent money and I have two retirements waiting for me.
That said, no way would I recommend to anyone in my family to be a Police Officer now. Your hands are tied, most of the public you deal with hates you, everyone thinks they know how to do your job better, you are second guessed more, and you have a high chance of going to prison for defending yourself.
Show your son this thread and reach out to some of us and I am sure one of us would be willing to speak to him.
 
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Pretty Ladies!
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<--- Another retiree who wouldn't advise anybody I cared remotely about to start a career in law enforcement today.

If he's determined to do it, he needs to try for the Feds. If he can't make the cut with them and still wants to do it at the state, local, or county level, then he needs to avoid urban areas, particularly urban areas with a black population greater than 25%. That includes the immediate suburbs of those places and definitely any smaller departments, like university police departments or VA hospitals, within the city's jurisdiction.
 

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I would not recommend the profession to anyone i love. I've been with a city and am currently on my second federal agency.

The cost is too high and the people are not worth it. I would not sacrifice either of my sons or my daughter to this profession.
 

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If he has his heart set on it, and doesn't mind moving look into Las Vegas Metro Police. Great starting pay and very solid support from the community and the administration. Currently hiring now and for the foreseeable future.
 

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Have you seen me?
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Twenty-two years in law enforcement next month...please try to talk him out of it. The risks are too big now and no longer worth it.
Worrying about physical harm was never my concern, at least not after a few months in.

The last third of my career or so was spent stressing about going to prison, even though I did everything right and followed my training and policy. The guy in Atlanta (Taser incident) and the other officer in CA (shooting a guy who came at him with a baseball bat) are two prime examples. Neither of them did ANYTHING outside of policy or law that would account for their arrests...yet, they were and now have to deal with that stress. Plus, there will always be the specter of federal charges hanging over them.

If that's not enough, activist prosecutors are now digging up cases that were once cleared and indicting officers for stuff that happened years ago. The story posted here in Coptalk a few weeks ago about the FBI agent, for instance. He was a local in Texas, killed a guy in the line of duty. The Rangers cleared him and the Bureau didn't have any issues, as they hired him as an agent after the investigation. Yet, a ***** of a prosecutor indicted the guy.

**** that. **** it hard, long, and with a cactus.

I'm just glad I made it out without any serious uses of force that could go that road, especially since politicians in Louisville are losing their minds. I can't fathom being retired and out of this BS, then getting prosecuted for something that was cleared years ago.

So yeah...we talked our kid outta following in our footsteps.
 

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Have you seen me?
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I would not recommend the profession to anyone i love. I've been with a city and am currently on my second federal agency.

The cost is too high and the people are not worth it. I would not sacrifice either of my sons or my daughter to this profession.
Mike the Cop said as much when he turned in his badge, and he was a part-timer. He is running a couple of cool things for officers, too. Offering free jiu-jitsu courses, as well as a program to help LE types get real estate licenses and leave the job.

Doing God's work, that guy.
 

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My son is in AIT for 31B in the Army. Among other interests, he's still considering a career in LE. He's under no delusions about the current attitude toward police in this country. He's active military for 5 years, who knows what can happen in 5 years. My advice to him was to work toward a degree while he's in and choose his backup plan.
 
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