So I Bought a New PPK

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by MGGLOCK9, Oct 8, 2020.

  1. taurn88

    taurn88

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    The recent PPK threads got me thinking about picking one up.. I think I'll go for the PPK later, I don't like the longer grip on the PPK/s.
     
  2. MGGLOCK9

    MGGLOCK9

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    Update..So today (Saturday) I went to the range and tried two additional loads in the PPK. One was Federal hi-shok (not made now, I think) and the other Sig V-crown. The Sig stuff looked like the old Speer "flying ashtray" .45acp. I thought -"if it feeds this without a burp I'll carry it."

    Yep. flawless. So in the carry rotation it goes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2020
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  3. presidingglock

    presidingglock

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    As much as I want to own one of these, but it cost more than 2k US dollars in the Philipoines. Sigh...
     
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  4. texasKA

    texasKA

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    I really like mine. But it is not LH friendly so it is always in the safe
     
  5. taurn88

    taurn88

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    That sounds very reliable. This is the regular PPK not the PPK/s right?
     
  6. MGGLOCK9

    MGGLOCK9

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    Yes, it's a PPK. Shorter grip-and since the pebbled grip wraps around the back, it provides a better hand purchase than the PPK/s or PP.
     
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  7. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Much like it surprises us to hear reports of unreliable Glocks, but I suspect it is for the same reason.

    A PPK has its breach held shut with a strong recoil spring - that means to fully cycle and not malfunction, the power of your ammo and the counter-resistance to the frame moving with the recoil has to be enough to overcome that powerful spring. If your grip is bad, it isn't going to fully cycle and you will get limpwristing malfunctions.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2020
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  8. Berto

    Berto woo woo

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    Straight blowback guns often have more favorable feed geometries, so they can have that advantage over locked breech/ delayed blowback guns....but yeah bad grip or interference with the slide (or safety) can jam anything.
     
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  9. OD#3

    OD#3

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    I just picked one of these up recently, and just holding it told me that I'd need to do some work on the beavertail. Its edges are quite sharp, and many a reviewer has mentioned these leaving sore red marks or even scratches on the shooting hand. I attacked the sharp edges with files, sandpaper, and green scotchbrite pads, rounding the edges over comfortably. But the filings and dust created necessitated a complete tear-down and cleaning.

    In answer to your question, though there was no mechanical firing pin safety to make it drop-safe, I did notice that the firing pin appeared to be made of titanium. Though I've seen no advertisement about this, it was much lighter than a comparable steel firing pin and was non-magnetic. So I believe it IS titanium. Colt has been making use of titanium firing pins in their 1911's for a while now, do to its low mass compared to steel, making it far, far less likely to be able to set a primer off with its own inertia if the pistol is dropped on the muzzle. Same concept here.

    Incidentally, I was very pleased with this pistol's high quality machining, fit, and finish. Though I softened the edges of the beavertail (and the rear edges of the slide), this was not an effort to correct any "mistakes" on Walther's part. All the originals I've seen have had these same very sharp edges--it shows off the fine machining. I did note that the trigger guard appeared to have been cast, as did one or two small internal (and non-stress) parts. But the bulk of this pistol appears to have been precision machined out of billet.

    Shot very well, too and was extremely comfortable. No slide bite and no sore web.

    And I just don't get all these comments I read here and elsewhere about the objectionable recoil with the .380 versions. I shot this immediately after wringing out a Colt Mustang Pocketlite in .380. The two recoil differently, but I didn't really notice the PPK/s' recoil being at all harsh or unpleasant. I was shooting quite a few handguns that day, and the only one to shoot slightly softer than the PPK/s was the Colt Mustang Pocketlite, which is lighter than the PPK but also utilizes a locked breech. So it was able to achieve very slightly less recoil than the PPK/s--despite its being a good deal smaller and lighter. BUT, it was incapable of grouping as nicely as the PPK/s and was really too small to get a good grip on it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2020
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  10. rds95991

    rds95991 NRA Benefactor

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    My Ranger PPK S/N 0006XX is the only Walther PP/PPK/s/PPK that I've ever had the railroad track issue.
     
  11. ottomatic

    ottomatic

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    I carried an early Interarms stainless PPK in the 80s and 90s. It was reliable for me. One of the things I did, was to Dremel off the grooves in the trigger. Made it much more comfortable to shoot, particularly the first shot.
    Eventually replaced it with a Kel Tec P40, which was the same size, but 40 S&W instead of 380. That (P40) was the hardest recoiling (semi-auto) handgun I have ever shot.
     
  12. Pier23

    Pier23 Silver Member

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    I too got a SmithWalther - took me a few tries to get one that didn’t jam or shed pins, and really enjoy it. Carry it from time to time. The Sig 232 is a better iteration of the concept, but the PPK is a classic. Never had Walther tracks but yeah, the hand does not have a lot of clearance.

    My great remembrance of picking up the SmithWalther was agonizing over color schemes. There were three sales guys and me huddled around the store’s selection of SmithWalthers, weighing the pros and cons of all stainless and stainless with color accent options.... I opted for the dark blue/stainless version. But geesh, we would be having a hard time convincing onlookers we were not agonizing over window treatments....
     
  13. Pier23

    Pier23 Silver Member

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    upload_2020-10-30_5-3-42.jpeg

    Sadly, not mine, but my wife sent me this shot she took at an area flea market. No idea if it is still at the store.
     
  14. MGGLOCK9

    MGGLOCK9

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    Yes, I hope they do make a 7.65mm. The original chambering of the gun.
     
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  15. MGGLOCK9

    MGGLOCK9

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    OMG..looks like the ones they sell at Legacy Collectibles..they would likely ask $1500.00 and up..
     
  16. MGGLOCK9

    MGGLOCK9

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    Update...PPK Now 800+ flawless rounds.

    But my mountain of stockpiled .380 is now a molehill.

    So after wringing out my Colt Mustang XSP yesterday, I have stopped shooting .380.

    Now on to the mountain of .32acp and my two Walther police turn-in PPs.

    (BTW, the XSP First Edition is a great gun, one of a special run Colt made. Nicer finish and beautiful slide markings.)

    Flawless with standard magazines, but will not work with 7 rounders(?)
     
  17. OD#3

    OD#3

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    I just finished some work on a friend's Interarms PPK. He was complaining about its hesitation upon trying to chamber the first hollowpoint in each magazine. It never failed to chamber, but it did hesitate with that first round. I blended the feedramp with the barrel like it is on my new PPK/S, and it now feeds as smoothly as mine. But this work necessitated a complete teardown of his frame, and I couldn't help but be impressed with the fine machining of my latest version compared to his Interarms. His serial number dates to between 1995 and 1996. Most of my small parts look to be machined from some sort of barstock. All his parts were cast. And there were many areas in the frame that weren't machined at all and retained their rough "as cast" finish. By contrast, I could only positively identify two parts on mine that were made from castings; the rest appeared to have been precision milled from billet. It is no wonder that the new PPK's and PPK/s' cost so much nowadays. Far more machining work is required on these than anything else Walther puts out these days.