Smooth Combat trigger vs ridged target trigger

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by 9mmgeek, Oct 17, 2019.

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  1. bac1023

    bac1023

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    On a Glock, it makes no difference to me.
     
  2. Mike-M

    Mike-M

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    The only non-Glock handgun I own that has a Trigger Safety is the Ruger LCP II. The LCP II has probably the best trigger pull out of the entire menagerie of small 380ACP pistols. (The predecessor LCP has one of the worst.) It has a relatively short SAO 5.5-lbf pull that's made even better by its broad flat Trigger Safety surface. And as a SAO pistol with a fully-cocked hammer after the slide is racked to chamber a round, that Trigger Safety performs a very important safety function (along with the pocket holster around the pistol).

    In Glock-World, it has never bothered me to use the grooved-face Trigger. It is my perception that the grooved-face Trigger actually reduces the aggravating sensation delivered by the thin protruding Trigger Safety blade...the true offender causing discomfort IMO.

    There is no technical reason why Glock could or should not employ a broad, flat, flush Trigger Safety similar to that of the LCP II. This issue should have been given attention for Glock's latest generations, because IMO this is much more significant than superficial nonsense like finger grooves, flaired mag wells, beavertail backstraps, and front "serrations" (sic).
     

  3. GeorgiaGlocker

    GeorgiaGlocker Romans 10:9

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    I prefer the smooth triggers as well. One day I was at the range and shot 300 rounds from my G26 with a serrated trigger. I still remember how sore my finger was.
     
  4. Beendare

    Beendare Stick and String, SME, NRA life member

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    Ditto^........
    [ some of the young guys might be scratching their heads,'What is that?']

    ...
     
  5. Pteridine

    Pteridine

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    Glock saves money on the trigger safety by making the dingus out of old razor blades. Why they can't make it wider and round the edges is probably all about money and lack of innovation on Gaston's part.
     
  6. happyguy

    happyguy Man, I'm Pretty

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    I hear guys say you'll never see your sights, never hear the muzzle blast, and never feel the recoil, in a combat situation, but it's important to them to swap out that ridged trigger because the smooth trigger is so much better and they also have to have an audible and tactile reset. :animlol:

    If you prefer a smooth trigger, by all means put one in there, but don't expect to miraculously become a GM because of it.

    Regards,
    Happyguy :)
     
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  7. Toocool45

    Toocool45

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    Ill stick with stock. Out of the box of my glock pistols. Ive considered modifying the glock G34 platform. But as of yet i dont have a problem with out of the box glock models. They all seem to shoot the same great. But some shoot better than others. But i certainly can see someone seeing the need of modification of their guns to fit their tastes. A 1911 is easier for me to shoot or was. The light 1911 single action trigger ya know. Now i am accustomed to the angle and pointability of the glock platform. And no i have not sold my 1911s or my old sigs. I just dont shoot them.
     
  8. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    'Expectations' is a very big word in shooting. It's the ability to understand what can happen, and therefore what is probably going to happen, with a relatively high degree of precision. A shooter who's able to do that will get consistent results pretty close to his max. One who can't is subject to a wider range of outcomes, which can be much lower than his max.

    Mathematically, consider a marginal GM going up against a solid B shooter. So literally a 95% shooter vs. a 72% shooter. Subjectively, most people would expect the GM to crush the B-classer. But what if the B shooter is 99% in command of his game and the GM is only 75% in command? .72 x .99 = 71.28%. .95 x .75 = 71.25%. So the B shooter is actually mathematically better.

    Consider your 10 yard drill above as a Bill. If your draw was 1.0, that would be a total of 1.0 + (5 x 0.25) = 2.25. If you had the gun pointed in the right place, a 6 inch group would be all alphas, so 30 points. 30/2.25 = 13.33 HF. Specifically what would you need to do to make that an 18 HF run?

    Once the gun is on target, the only 2 things really determining shot placement are grip and trigger press. How long does it take the sights to return to the A zone with your present grip? What if your grip was good enough that they never left the A zone? How much perceptual detail can you have of the trigger press in 0.25? Can you have that same level of detail in 0.20? How about 0.15?

    Truth is, most people do all sorts of stuff during the day where they have much higher mechanical expectations than they do with shooting. When you put the key in your front door, do you expect it might miss the hole and gouge the wood? Of course not. Is that possible? Yes, but it would be an extreme negative outlier, generally excluded by your understanding and expectation of mechanical capability.

    What if you had to put the key in the lock at the fastest rate possible to get your kid to the ER? Would you gouge the door then? Probably still not. So context and expectations play a pretty big role in outcome.

    When you see someone do something that you can't currently do, it's easy to believe they have mystical abilities, or just vastly superior talent. But with pistol shooting, most of the really rad stuff you see is mostly people who are pretty good at organizing events in time and space, and they've studied those events enough to know fairly precisely how they can fit together.
     
  9. GlockFan7

    GlockFan7

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    I own Glocks in double digits and I couldn't tell you which one has what. There's Glock on my hip as I type this and I couldn't tell you what's on it either.
     
  10. OttoLoader

    OttoLoader

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    Likely means you are holding the Glock properly as intended by the Glock designers and engineers.

    With proper grip, and finger placement no Glock knuckle and no trigger finger pinching.

    Also no low left shots if right handed.
     
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  11. jr24

    jr24

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    It certainly got in the weeds with later posts, but yes my finger doesn't get hurt by either of the triggers or by the dongle. That's All I was initially trying to say.
     
  12. 9mmgeek

    9mmgeek

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    I thought I would get notifications when replies were posted. I didn’t realize how much this thread developed. Thanks L-2 for the link. That explains the changes in the BATFE points for the Gen 5s.

    For the rest it sounds like the conclusion is “different strokes...”. If it doesn’t bother you don’t worry about it. If it does try swapping it. If it bothers you that it bothers other people, find something else to think about. Something fun like shooting your Glock. I call the target trigger ridged because it is not a flat surface with grooves. The face is curved making steps, or ridges not grooves.

    On my first glock, a gen3 g26, the swap to a smooth trigger was a big improvement and it became a habit to swap the trigger if it was ridged. I do notice the safety lever hurting sometimes and question my grip and trigger pull, but I have also done some careful smoothing on some. Usually the larger calibers.
     
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