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CRB original
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When did it become cool to curl ones weak hand thumb over the top of the slide to manipulate it for checking, or chambering a round?

TR
 

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I can't make my thumb do what that sounds like. Please show a picture.
 

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Are you asking about using an "overhand grip"? If so, it's been somewhat popular since "gross" motor movements were found to be easier to perform under stress.
 

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I can't really picture what the OP is talking about. Pics would help.

ETA- not sure why it would matter how people manipulate their slides.
 

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He is referring to using the thumb and web of the thumb in front of the ejection port to press check or chamber a round.

like this guy at ~ 1:20

 

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I think that the reasoning goes that you grip the slide differently than when racking the slide so that you accidentally don't rack the slide. Also, the tip of the thumb touches the extended trigger finger along the slide, preventing you to pull the slide too far back.

Personally, I pinch grip underneath the slide, and simultaneously pull back from the ejection port with my trigger finger. That way I can also feel the round in the chamber.
 

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CRB original
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep...the video shows exactly what I was speaking about. Im seeing lots of folks use this technique to chamber a round, and not just press check for condition.

Just curious is all. I can't seem to gravitate to it, much less execute it very well with full power recoil spring systems.

TR
 

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Do what works for you. Don’t worry about what the cool kids are doing. On second thought, try what the cool kids are doing and if it doesn’t work for you then don’t do it. Everyone has different hand size, hand strength, arm strength, etc.
 

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Why do I need to press check during regular shooting? Different than checking the chamber of a gun you haven’t handled for a bit.
 

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Ok, the "curl" of the thumb was what I couldn't picture. I think of this as pinching the slide with the thumb. It's as valid as any other method.
 

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To make a press check. If you form a habit of doing it every time you handle the gun, you don't forget to do it when you should.
 

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To form a habit?
why? And I’ve had this debate in PMC groups. Aside from checking the condition of a firearm that one hasn’t handled for a while, if I’m shooting orwhatever, my weapon operates as its supposed to then why do I need to do press checks while shooting? Every time it went bang a round was there and it went bang again. Whether I reload or Tac re load or whatever the weapon had been functioning as expected.
 

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I have seen it happen many times, and it has happened to me also, that a shooter for some reason does not chamber a round properly, or fails to rack the slide althogether.

I have formed a habit of doing a press check when I reload an empty gun. Either during practice session, or when loading duty ammo after the session.
 

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To make a press check. If you form a habit of doing it every time you handle the gun, you don't forget to do it when you should.
I have seen it happen many times, and it has happened to me also, that a shooter for some reason does not chamber a round properly, or fails to rack the slide althogether.



I have formed a habit of doing a press check when I reload an empty gun. Either during practice session, or when loading duty ammo after the session.
Ok. Everybody has their way.
 

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Having your fingers flopping around out there seems like bad idea. Maybe it's an affectation like holding your pinky out when you sip tea? I curl my fingers in and pinch the slide in front of the ejection port. On a glock (at least the ones I own) you can see the chambered round, as well as see and feel the raised extractor, without manipulating the slide. IMO, no need to "press check" glocks, just "check".
 
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