Skeet shooting tips?

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by Jsferrazza, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. Jsferrazza

    Jsferrazza

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    Hey Guys,

    I'm going skeet shooting for the first time this weekend at a local skeet and trap club.

    Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Dave514

    Dave514

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    Keep your face down on the gun. Sweep through to lead the target and follow through. Don't expect to be great right off the bat.
     
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  3. happyguy

    happyguy Man, I'm Pretty

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    I shot skeet for about a year as a teenager.

    I ran into a former Olympian at the rod and gun and I made more progress in the 30 minutes she spent with me than in the entire previous year.

    Regards,
    Happyguy :)
     
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  4. peng

    peng

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    I used to shoot skeet a lot, not so much anymore.

    First question, do you really mean skeet ? No offense intended, but many people use the terms skeet and trap interchangeably, or really any clay target shooting and do not realize they are very different.

    If you are talking about the 8 station, high and low house sport, that is skeet.

    It is very mechanical actually. I had no trouble shooting 25 straight after just a bit of practice, and I am not a great wingshot. Station 4 is the hardest in terms of lead, station 8 is the hardest in terms of speed and lack of forgiveness. A O/U is the preferred gun, but any shotgun will work OK.

    Use small pellets to get a good pattern density, 8's or 9's are the best. I/C or open chokes are best, the distances are not great.

    Shoulder the gun prior to the pull and practice the swing motion. If you are used to shooting at moving targets it will not be difficult. Sporting clays are much, much harder. Ask the range master to throw you a practice bird, he may do it. It will help you with tracking and anticipation.

    When you finally hit the station 8 high house, breathe in some of the dust from the blue rock.:supergrin: Have fun.
     
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  5. Jsferrazza

    Jsferrazza

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    Great info, and yes I mean skeet shooting.
     
  6. Dynactus

    Dynactus

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    One important concept is that we aim a rifle and we point a shotgun. In other words, keep your eyes on the clay, not on your barrel/sight. If you look at your sight, you will stop the movement of your barrel and shoot behind the clay. When you find yourself missing, and you will, try shooting just a little bit farther out in front of the clay than you think you should. Also, there are some good videos on YouTube you could watch. Have fun!
     
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  7. CBennett

    CBennett

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    Well if you can shoot with both eyes open...I cant so im at a disadvantage(i cant only do both eyes with a red dot type sight).swing through the target after you pull the trigger. Im not good at it..to be honest I shot better the first time I shot it than I did the 7th time lol..maybe luck..no idea..havent been in a year or more now..but I really liked it. Remember your lead on the clay..its always nice when you have someone thats shot a lot of Skeet helping you out..often I cant tell what im doing wrong unless someone is critiquing me..I have no idea why/how im missing...but if you get some help like that it will be immense help.
     
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  8. Tony Rumore

    Tony Rumore

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    Back in 1989 I was fortunate enough to shoot with a guy that was ranked in the top 10 in the nation. I was breaking about 50%, but on the third trip out with Dave, I broke 50 straight. I won't waste the bandwidth writing a book on what he taught me, but here's the Cliff notes and the most important details.

    Hold your gun, pointing out in front of the house, with your chin down, ready to fire....but swing your eyes over and stare directly into the hole, so you can see the bird when it first comes out. NEVER EVER let the bird get in front of your barrel. If you have to catch up, you already screwed up. When the bird comes out, start your swing to match the speed of the bird, hold a sustained lead, and fire. If you keep getting behind the bird, you need to hold the gun further off the house to give you more time to get the swing started. The better you get, the closer to the house you can start your swing.

    You also need to learn the pathway of the bird's flight, so from your start position, to your firing position, is one straight line. In order to do this, it is best to just stand there and throw bird after bird, as you track it's path, until you figure out the exact trajectory to swing the barrel. You don't want to start swinging side to side, and then have to make a huge vertical correction.

    Also, the traps are rarely calibrated which is just sloppy range prep. The range should have a long pole with a hoop on it, kinda like a basketball hoop. You hold it out in the center like a surveyor and birds from each house must both pass through it in the same position or the traps are not throwing correctly. I don't recall exactly where the calibration spot is on the range to position the hoop.....that was a long time ago.

    Tony
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2016
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  9. Jsferrazza

    Jsferrazza

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    Great info, thanks!

    I am taking an hour session with an instructor when I go, but just wanted some pointers ahead of time as well.

    Thanks Guys!
     
  10. Tony Rumore

    Tony Rumore

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    Hey, when you're there, ask the instructor about the calibration hoop.......I don't remember all the details and would like to hear what he says about it.

    Tony
     
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  11. Dynactus

    Dynactus

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    Some people can actually see the dimples on the clays when they are in mid-air. Judging by their scores, I believe them.
     
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  12. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

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    Doh ?
    Google Clay Coach Online Skeet, there is a series covering each station. Here's the first one.....

     
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  13. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

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    Doh ?
    I don't know how much of a shotgun shooter you are, but eye dominance is probably more important in shotgun shooting than any other gun sport.

    Most people don't understand eye dominance, probably the worst are pistol instructors. They will do a "hole-in-the-card" (or "hole in the hand") and proclaim you to be cross-dominant, where your dominant eye is on the opposite side of your dominant hand, or not.

    In reality, you can be strongly right or strongly left dominant - but you can also be weak left or right, or even ambidextrous (sometimes called "center-dominant"). Women are more likely to be weak dominant or ambidextrous (My wife and I had a few "lively discussions" (I am a pistol instructor after all) until I did some research about eye dominance). A good shotgun coach can determine true dominance.

    If you are strongly dominant on your dominant hand side, you have the easiest combination. If you are strongly cross dominant, you should learn to shoot on your dominant eye side, this is probably 2nd easiest.

    Weak and ambidextrous are the most difficult. A small patch over the "off" eye to block the view of the (side) barrel will help. When most people "patch" an eye, they make a patch too big. Most of the time the patch only needs to be about the size of a hole in a piece of loose-leaf paper; and a translucent patch (generally) works better than an opaque patch.

    http://www.range365.com/shotgun-shooting-eyes-wide-open

    https://shotgunreport.com/2013/11/29/cross-dominance-2/
     
  14. WeeWilly

    WeeWilly

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    His videos a terrific.

    Also look up the ones he has on shotgun mounting and fit considerations.
     
  15. FelixD

    FelixD

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    If you ever have the opportunity to take lessons, or a gun fitting, from Batha its well worth the money. He is a really good instructor who uses all his experience to teach and not just talk about it. He can actually translate what he does into usable details. And, he is no slouch with a gun.
     
  16. Jsferrazza

    Jsferrazza

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    I appreciate everyone's input on this! Just to update, I went to the class and had a blast!

    I shot 17 of 25 in one round, and 20 of 25 in the other round. I didn't think I did all that great at first, but all of the guys at the club said that was some really good shooting for my very first time, especially since I have very little experience with shotguns.

    I think I found a new hobby, and am already looking at buying my own shotgun!

    :supergrin:

    Thanks again!
     
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  17. papershoot

    papershoot

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    I started trap shooting a Remington 1100, with a fixed modified choke. My first skeet shooting sessions were humbling. Now I would use improved cylinder on all of the stations except 8. I'll use cylinder for 8.
    Having some instruction is a great idea. Staying ahead of the bird, how much to lead, and learning to swing the gun are critical. I would try to relax and take pleasure in the sport.
     
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