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Silicone bakeware

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by MrsKitty, Dec 17, 2004.

  1. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Has anybody tried any of the silicone bakeware? What do you think of it? Does it release without sticking?
     
  2. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

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    Yep. Gave my wife some last Christmas.

    Yes it releases well, with little---if any---sticking.

    You must support it on a cookie sheet. Cannot let it sit on the hot rack.

    And you have to make sure the oven is preheated.

    And it doesn't seem to conduct heat as well as metal, so the crust doesn't seem to be as "crusty".

    We prefer non-stick metal. Tried it and quickly relegated it to the lower depths of the cookie sheet drawer.

    NRA_guy
     

  3. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Thanks!

    I make flax bread alot. I use ALL flax instead of flour, etc in it. I cannot get it to come out of a glass loaf pan for anything. I have four here I have tried! I know it isn't the pans as zuchinni releases like a dream from them.

    I have looked at non-stick and for a decent weight pan, they are pretty pricey around here. And I would only use it for the flax as everything else comes out ok in the glass. I can get a silicone set at Sam's with several pieces for $30. I thought it might be the route to go...
     
  4. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

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    I don't know anything about flax bread. I only "do" cornbread in cast iron (no sugar!) My wife does the serious stuff.

    The silicon pans might work well for you. They do offer two advantages over metal:

    1. The sides are flexible, so after you cook the food, you can flex the pan and pull the sides away from the food. You don't need to run the dreded kife around the sides. Aaaaagggggghhhh!

    2. The bottom is also flexible; so you can sort of push up from the bottom to get it out.

    But as I said, the silicon insulates the sides from the heat and leaves the sides of the food sort of non-crispy. The sides end up being sort of like muffins cooked in those infernal paper cup inserts (but the release from the silicon is much better than from the paper inserts.) I hate muffins cooked in paper inserts. If muffins are not going to have crusty sides, why bother?

    You might buy just one silicon pan and try it, rather than a whole set. But hey, it's Christmas and somebody is racking his brain to think of a good gift for you. Let him give you the silicone set. He'll be relieved. But you'll need to cut out the picture and give itto him and tell him what store to get it from.

    Good luck.

    NRA_guy
     
  5. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Thanks for the info! :)

    Actually, this person spotted the set first and inquired as to whether I already had any. They know I am a kitchen gadget/gizmo junkie ;f