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Curious to get the advice and opinions of GLOCK enthusiasts about the best ways a beginner to intermediate shooter could self-guide their trip to the range with things like:

- shooting advice / safety tips
- shooting drills
- shot timer
- submitting targets for analysis / advice

I'm also looking for ways that GLOCKs are different than other handguns and how to tailor the items above to a GLOCK owner in particular. (e.g. 3 safeties, field stripping, cleaning etc)

Most of the range people I talk to immediately recommend YouTube. But what else?

Look forward to your advice and thoughts. I'm working on an exciting project and these inputs would be most helpful. Thanks!
 

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Find the nearest competition nearest to you, and start shooting competition. USPSA/IDPA/Steel Challenge and local action pistol matches. Start with USPSA.com and IDPA.com. Most clubs have several venues.
 

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check out IDPA rules and course of fire
http://www.idpa.com/compete/rules

you can make silhouette targets form paper grocery bags
http://www.instructables.com/id/Paper-Bag-IDPA-Target/

get a timer
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/772064/competition-electronics-pocket-pro-shot-timer

set up a drill, shoot the drill, record your score using IDPA scoring rules, do this 10 times and average. each time you practice run the 10 drills and average, compare to our last time out to see if you are consistent or improving.

as far as range safety, all weapons on the range have the action open with no ammo near them.
once a weapon is loaded its holstered in a holster that covers the trigger and stays there until its fired on the range or being unloaded, never un-holster your weapon for any other reason.

learn to do mag changes with out un-holstering your weapon. if you empty your weapon during a course of fire, after you reload, immediately re-holster your weapon.

Remember, practice with purpose cause what you do in practice will be what you do in reality, don't just think of the shot, think before the shot - where's my weapon, mag's, flashlight, cell phone, etc. and after shot - cover, area awareness, safe your weapon, etc. don't just practice hitting the target but everything up to and after hitting the target.

sig357fan

PS, I made up a template for the "-0 -1" scoring rings and mark the targets with a pencil, can't see the marks from the firing line.
 

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Find a reputable instructor in your area and take a class. You don't need to go all $5k Thunder Ranch/Gunsite level training to get good instruction. Trust me self training unless you know WTF you're doing is a SLOW process.

Stay the hell away from YouTube unless you have done research on the video producers. YouTube has more jackasses than Jackass the movie.
 

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Find a reputable instructor in your area and take a class. You don't need to go all $5k Thunder Ranch/Gunsite level training to get good instruction. Trust me self training unless you know WTF you're doing is a SLOW process.

Stay the hell away from YouTube unless you have done research on the video producers. YouTube has more jackasses than Jackass the movie.

What Taz said is good advice. Since you mentioned new and intermediate shooters I'll throw in a few things. When starting out, and keeping skills honed, do a lot of dry firing. Work on your muscle memory with the sight picture, trigger and manipulation of gun, holster and magazines.

Start out slow, don't be so concerned about timing yourself. Be smooth and your speed will increase. Once you feel your marksmanship is getting good, increase your distance and see if you are maintaining a good group. 15 yards is enough for mistakes to show up, 25 can definitely send you off the paper if you are flinching or snatching the trigger.

Once you feel that you've got the slow stuff well in hand increase your time. Try firing as soon as your sights realign on target.

Just remember, a few well placed shots are more effective, and gratifying, then multiple erratic shots. And if you have one of those days at the range where it just gets worse as you go on, sometimes it's good to just pack up, regroup and come back on another day. No use reinforcing bad habits. Good luck!!
 

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Find the nearest competition nearest to you, and start shooting competition. USPSA/IDPA/Steel Challenge and local action pistol matches. Start with USPSA.com and IDPA.com. Most clubs have several venues.
Great idea. Our local group is a great bunch of shooters. I have learned so much at IDPA. All have been willing to share, guide and advise in a safe learning environment. Practical skills. I'd recommend it for anyone not just novices.
 

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First you learn accuracy, then you learn to speed up accuracy. IMO, accuracy (slow fire) depends on trigger finger discipline. Then speed depends on grip tuning. The very first drill to work on accuracy is the dot torture. Then you speed up your shooting with pairs and triples. 22lr helps me with the speed and grip tuning. Still learning every day. I like Ben Stoeger's scaled targets and dry fire practice drills book. I like Ben's wife Kita because shes just nice to look at:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eS6fREpuVmo&t=198s


Glocks are the best for beginners IMO. The stock trigger teaches you the right amount of trigger finger. and the fat blocky grip fills out the hand nice for recoil management.
 

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Afrohick
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Curious to get the advice and opinions of GLOCK enthusiasts about the best ways a beginner to intermediate shooter could self-guide their trip to the range with things like:

- shooting advice / safety tips
- shooting drills
- shot timer
- submitting targets for analysis / advice

I'm also looking for ways that GLOCKs are different than other handguns and how to tailor the items above to a GLOCK owner in particular. (e.g. 3 safeties, field stripping, cleaning etc)

Most of the range people I talk to immediately recommend YouTube. But what else?

Look forward to your advice and thoughts. I'm working on an exciting project and these inputs would be most helpful. Thanks!
I highly recommend the purchase of Master Handgun Accuracy by Concealed Carry University. The author is a glock shooter. He will recommend an entire process including dry firing before ever hitting the range. It will work wonders for you.
 

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I can't add much to the good advice above. Walk before you run. Learn the gun thru dry fire, practice from a holster, then go shoot for accuracy. IMO, when you can shoot tennis ball groups at 50ft, you are ready to speed up. Until then, trying to go fast will work fine 7yds & under, but beyond that your accuracy will suffer if you don't have the basics of grip, trigger, sights.
A handgun is a handgun, the skills don't change because you shoot a Glock or a 1911. They are diff, but the skill set is the same for any pistol. Tuning is a matter of taste. I don't like really light triggers but as smooth & crisp & predictable as possible, 3.5# is where I like to be, regardless of pistol. Especially for something you may have to fight with.
 
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First you learn accuracy, then you learn to speed up accuracy. IMO, accuracy (slow fire) depends on trigger finger discipline. Then speed depends on grip tuning. The very first drill to work on accuracy is the dot torture. Then you speed up your shooting with pairs and triples. 22lr helps me with the speed and grip tuning. Still learning every day. I like Ben Stoeger's scaled targets and dry fire practice drills book. I like Ben's wife Kita because shes just nice to look at:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eS6fREpuVmo&t=198s


Glocks are the best for beginners IMO. The stock trigger teaches you the right amount of trigger finger. and the fat blocky grip fills out the hand nice for recoil management.
I agree about the accuracy & dry fire, but handguns are personal choice items. The Glock doesn't fit everyone well. The advantage IMO is the simple firing design &, even though poor trigger, they are repeatable. One of the biggest obstacles to good shooting is proper trigger manipulation. Ask the NYPD.
 

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As someone who used the self learning method for years, I'll say this. There is no substitute for professional training. Yes, you can teach yourself through books, videos etc, however, having someone standing behind you who has made the same mistakes you are making and has the proper training to recognize those errors will pay off ten fold.

Overall, it will greatly increase your learning curve. Even though I had been shooting 20 plus years when I participated in the first class I had attended taught by a world class instructor, I learned so much in those three days. That got me addicted to training at that point. I've been very fortunate that my job has provided me with the opportunity to learn from some of the best instructors in the business over the last eleven years. Competition is NOT a substitute for training, however, it is a great way to add stress to your training regimen and also teaches you to properly compartmentalize that stress to increase your efficiency in a potentially critical situation.

In 2006, I started living by the philosophy above and liquidated a large amount of my firearms collection and stuck with the basics. Duty handgun, off-duty handgun, backup handgun, carbine and precision rifle. This put me down to three calibers to load for and with my Dillon XL-650, I feed them regularly. I took the funds that I raised through that liquidation and invested in more training and reloading supplies. Instead of collecting a lot of guns, I learned to use them to the best of their and my ability.

To summarize, get professional training. Cultivate a proper mindset through a follow up self study regimen and finally, prove to yourself that you are making improvement by attending competition.
 
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To summarize, get professional training. Cultivate a proper mindset through a follow up self study regimen and finally, prove to yourself that you are making improvement by attending competition.
To piggyback on this. Competing is a very good way to improve your shooting. Not only does it apply focus & discipline, you get good pointers form better shooters. When I shoot in sanctioned matches, I do NOT want to be the best shooter on the squad. Also attend every classifier you can, idpa or uspsa. It is a defined COF, so you can track your improvement or decline. The timer & paper don't lie.
 
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