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Training, but a style that is applicable to why you are shooting. If it's primarily for gaming, go with a gaming instructor. If it's defense, go with a defensive shooting instructor. They are not the same thing.
Well no but a gaming instructor will get your gun skills up faster imo. SD instructors are more about tactics & short range point shooting. Some of the best gaming shooters in the world train police & military for a reason. Like fof doesnt teach upu how to shoot bit how to not get shot, diff things, bith useful in a fight.
 
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Well first of all it's not gaming, it's competition. But at the end of the day, when you have to go to guns, avoidance, de-escalation and retreat are no longer an option, all you have left is speed and accuracy. Even if you are only .1 seconds faster than the bad guy, that's still first shot in. It is far, far easier to teach tactics to a fast and accurate competition shooter than to get a tactical guy up to shooting fast and accurately. That takes constant practice and discipline.
 

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Well first of all it's not gaming, it's competition. But at the end of the day, when you have to go to guns, avoidance, de-escalation and retreat are no longer an option, all you have left is speed and accuracy. Even if you are only .1 seconds faster than the bad guy, that's still first shot in. It is far, far easier to teach tactics to a fast and accurate competition shooter than to get a tactical guy up to shooting fast and accurately. That takes constant practice and discipline.
I used gaming because he did, but yes, when it finally comes to guns, skill beats unskilled in most cases if both are trained. Trained & skilled beats untrained & unskilled 99% of the time, with 1% being just bad luck.
 
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Good advice, likely grip...plus anticipation of the bang...some great videos on youtube for learning more to refine skills...practice...but pick up fundamentals first vs. blowing threw ammo...
 

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When an instructor says the amount of finger on trigger doesnt matter isnt thinking about the unskilled shooter. Sure, I can manipulate a trigger at slow speed in all manner of positions & be accurate. At higher speeds is where trigger discipline starts breaking down.
 
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Front sight focus.

Let the boom surprise you.

If you're still shooting low and left, bench rest that gun.
 

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Front sight focus.

Let the boom surprise you.

If you're still shooting low and left, bench rest that gun.
Which is all good in slow fire but when shooting 1/2 sec splits or less, nothing is really a surprise, you have to have good trigger discipline.
 
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I have been more of a high shooter with my 26. Something I still struggle with if I don’t concentrate. It seems more common for new Glockers to shoot high due to problems adjusting to grip angle.

The idea is almost all of the work in the strong hand happens in the trigger finger. No other muscles flexing that much. If you’re introducing too much strong hand into the grip the rest of the muscles connected to the trigger finger tend to want to get in on the act, and that’s how you start throwing shots low and to your support side.

Think of your strong hand as something your support hand is bracing the gun against to shoot. Strong hand should only be 30-40% of grip force. It’s a common misconception that a firm grip starts with choking the butt of the gun to death with your strong hand, and then the support hand just rests against it.

Not so. What I think may have happened is if you came to the Glock from pistols with lighter, smoother triggers, that may have allowed you to get decent trigger pulls despite your mistakes. That covered up technique issues that are becoming more evident with the Glock.

The most effective thing I’ve done recently to improve my trigger technique and help isolate that trigger finger is dry firing one of my revolvers in double action mode only. It is frustrating at first but once I got decent at it My 1911s and other Semi auto tiggers felt like snapping a match stick when I transition back to them.
 

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Low left for a right handed shooter in my experience is a mixture of having less lateral pressure with your support hand and a preignition flinch.

I recommend tightening the grip of your support hand, and camming the arm of the support hand up to apply lateral force high on the frame of the pistol. Also just a bit of push pull. More of a push/resist than anything will help to prevent the firing wrist from breaking. At the same time I recommend learning how to prep your trigger properly.

If you don't like the concept of preping your trigger then work on essentially slapping your trigger without disturbing the sights in dry fire. You're looking to get through the trigger before your brain has time to process that there is going to be an explosion in your hand. People that I've worked with have more success thinking "press", or something similar instead of "shoot", or "now". I think that imagining an action rather than a result helps prevent the brain from connecting the dots? Not really sure but it seems to work.

Another thing to work on is keeping your eyes open through the shot. Focus downrange for a while. Don't worry about where your rounds go (within reason. Don't read what im not saying) in fact don't even post a target. Just try to observe the whole firing sequence. Once you've got that down you'll be able more prepared to see if your flinch is preignition (a flinch) or post ignition( controlling the recoil) especially during ball and dummy drills.

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It's actually kind of hard to troubleshoot your problem without watching you shoot. There are so many things that could be the cause of the issue.
 

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It's actually kind of hard to troubleshoot your problem without watching you shoot. There are so many things that could be the cause of the issue.
Absolutely. We can give advice, and guidance on what has worked for us; Or our students. Those things may not apply to your specific issue though. The best thing to do is to get instruction from a good instructor.

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It's actually kind of hard to troubleshoot your problem without watching you shoot. There are so many things that could be the cause of the issue.
Absolutely. We can give advice, and guidance on what has worked for us; Or our students. Those things may not apply to your specific issue though. The best thing to do is to get instruction from a good instructor.

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I have this issue with single stacks. I’ve had a shield, 365, 43. I shot all of them well. I can drill a single hole with them out to 10 yards. I just can’t get the hole in the center of the target. I’ve since sold them all but the shield. I actually own two because my wife prefers the shield.
 

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I’ve seen many shooters with a similar complaint suddenly “fix it” by not wrapping their left index finger (support hand) around the trigger guard, and then using a wedge grip. Not saying that is the fix for OP; as noted above there’s no way to tell for sure without watching OP shoot.
 
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Jerking the trigger.
it is a damn problem for me too. i did not really shoot much in last 20-25 years, other than very occasional outings with some friends, may be twice a year or so. or sometimes none at all.
to my frustration, it is indeed a perishable skill - and mine quite, well have perished.
with rapid fire all goes way down left - definitely jerking too much. and probably squeezing right hand too much. as i am trying to go by muscle memory on this - it is frustrating, as it means, probably, it needs to be re-learned, a lot.

as slow pace it kinda recovers but at 10yds spreads more to the left.
fast double taps - again all goes low left.

like - here, below - it is at a 30ft distance, 10 rounds, at a rate of 1 shot per sec or so, may be bit slower. i also suspect my red dot if not exactly zeroed to perfection, but, i can live with that.
so, a beginning was ok, at a middle of the clip hands start shaking, then it got closer to center again, but, all spread around pretty much. frustrating. and that is with red dot from 10 yards.
and this crap is quite typical now, with 3-4 shots outside of the target.
really pisses me off to see how it goes off up right and then off low left and i do not even sense why and when.
will try to do a session with a range instructor, but, go figure.
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