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Self defense in the woods

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by apocgambit, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. apocgambit

    apocgambit

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    Hi everyone, this is my first post, but I have ben a member for quite sometime. I have a very important question. I will be heading out for deer hunting this coming weekend and I carry am HK USP 45 as a backup sidearm...I just purchased som COR-BON Pow R Ball ammo...is that a good choice against the unexpected bear/mountain lion/crazy mountain men :) encounter...if not, can anyone make any good recomendations for this caliber handgun? Thank you everyone, I appreciate you taking the time to answer my question and for taking the time to read my post. Jesse
     
  2. Esox357

    Esox357

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    What grain of bullet? The 45acp is generally not a woods gun for four legged animals, two legged great four not so great. The 45 is underpowered for most game and was not designed for hunting purposes. There are two thoughts, use a FMJ to get penetration but little or no expansion, or go with a HP design and may not get the penetration needed. If it were me I would go with a 230 grain Golden Saber in the firearm or similar design. A magazine of FMJ should be handy as well. I am not too familar with the Corbon Powrball, but believe they were designed for rapid expansion, a big no no when using it on game like you mentioned. Esox357
     

  3. JimM_PA

    JimM_PA

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    I would rely on my deer hunting weapon of choice to do the job, but then again, I don't like to lug alot of extra weight in the deer woods. You can't hunt with a semi-automatic handgun in PA anyway, so a revolver in .357 or larger would be preferred during hunting season.
    Jim
     
  4. vafish

    vafish

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    I like the Powrball for a self defense round.

    But I think it's penetration is to shallow if you are looking for defense against bears.

    I'd just carry the Winchester White Box 230 gr JHP's if your gun feeds them.
     
  5. Nicolai

    Nicolai

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    For this kind of scenario, it's hard to be over powered. .45ACP wouldn't be my choice against large animals. What I would want is a Glock 20. A full powered 10mm round is very powerful. My second choice would be a .357 magnum, or larger revolver.
     
  6. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    Forget about hollowpoints, you need cast lead or FMJ bullets for penetration on animals. You need to reach the vital organs.

    A Colt SAA revolver in .45 Colt, using cast 255gr RNFP bullets seated over a compressed load of fffg would be better than a more modern pistol in .45 ACP for shooting wild animals.

    The original .45 Colt load was designed for the cavalry who had need of a sidearm that could reliably drop a man or horse. This would make an excellent weapon for anyone that will be out in the woods.

    If the Colt SAA is too much for your budget, you may want to get a Ruger Vaquero.
     
  7. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    Ok,a sidearm in the woods is a good idea,if it is legal in your area.If you encounter a bear,or mountain lion or some other threat to your life,i would use the dear rifle.The pistol is a last resort type of deal.I would not load it with powerball--its great on 2 legged predators,but not on animals.I would load it with a +p 230 grain fmj for the penetration on animals--but understand a 45 is very marginal for killing large animals--i would not try to kill a bear or mountain lion with it.It is better than nothing,but not as good as a 44 magnum or 454 etc..I hope this helps!!!
     
  8. skfullgun

    skfullgun

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    Well, I live in Texas and the worst I might encounter (besides a two-legged pervert) is a mountain lion. I would feel completely safe with my G-30 loaded with +p 230 gr. FMJ's.

    I've carried a G-27 and a G-26 while hiking, but I think the G-30 is a better choice.
     
  9. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    .45 would be fine against a cougar; not so fine against a bear, but certainly better than being unarmed. Small black bears can be easily taken with a .45. Cougars are easy to kill. They're not like their African cousins.
     
  10. Nicolai

    Nicolai

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    I think the ideal caliber for a big bear in a handgun would be:

    1. S&W 500 Magnum

    2. .475 Linebaugh

    3. .454 Casul



    Though, follow up shots would be alot easier w/ a semi. I too would want to use my rifle as my first line of defense.
     
  11. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    I watched a video one time--some hunters followed some dogs up into the boulders where they had a big cat cornered. I think it was a mountain lion--hard to remember.He shot it with a large revolver between the rocks--and it jumped and took him down to the ground in the blink of an eye--he had no chance--it was like lightning.I wish i could find a link to the video.It would make you rethink the whole-"I would just shoot the cat off of me" deal.In close quarters,it was crazy fast.They replayed it in slow motion,and it hit the guy like 3 or 4 times before the guy knew what was even happening..I have seen some small black bears that are no bigger than a dog--they would be easy to take with a 45.I have also seen some that are about 500 lbs and larger--would not want to face an animal of that size with a 45.
     
  12. Hunterjbb

    Hunterjbb

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    I'd get ahold of you local game commision folks and find out if you can even carry a semi-auto in the woods concealed while you are hunting... I'm sure you could take it to and from but you may have to leave it in the car while you are actually hunting.

    If you can, i would stick with a 230gr. FMJ or some kind of small cavity hollow point. Anybody make a jacketed Lead soft point for .45acp?. Although like folks said, rely on your rifle/shotgun etc. first, use the pistol as a back up and last resort.

    Jeff.
     
  13. ECVMatt

    ECVMatt

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    while fishing or hunting. I think the recomendation for Remington Golden Saber is a good one. I would not want to put Power R Ball against something big like a bear. It is always nice to have a handgun handy while you are hunting. Have a great trip.

    Matt
     
  14. Scoob

    Scoob

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    I saw this the other day. It was a loepard in Africa. The guy shot it with a large magnum revolver and it jumped him. The other guys with him had to unload on it with high-powered rifles.
     
  15. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    There was a guy who had a Glock 17 with 19 onboard for anti-poacher/terrorist defense hunting antelope in Africa who had an old crippled lion try to eat him while glassing for game. It knocked his gun away (rifle) and he had his left arm in it's mouth and his right unloading 19 rounds through it's ribs from contact distance. Lion died, he got chewed good.


    People rounds can work they're just not recommended.

    For mountain lions a .45 may do it (I know a guy who whacked one with a .455 Webley in the sixties), and for anything smaller or two legged it'll do fine.

    For deer/lions if you have time or bears, use your deer rifle.
     
  16. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    Scoob--yeah,ok,i was trying to remember what type of cat it was--That video was amazing wasnt it??
     
  17. sy2k

    sy2k

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    Is .45acp your only choice? If so, carry a FMJ round - a little better penetration for animals and still works well on humans. I don't think .45 is ideal for woods defense against animals, but if it's what you have, then it's better than not having a sidearm. Obviously, try to use your rifle first on an animal. I figure a handgun (my choice is the Glock 29, 200 gr. XTP/HP or 200 gr. flat points) is more for braining a big animal at close distance, like when he's already on top of you...
     
  18. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    Mtn. lions and leopards are whole different aminals. They are about the same size, both big cats, but a leopard is so much more dangerous it's not even worth comparing them. There's a reason the leopard is among the big 5 and the mtn lion isn't. If you do run into a leopard, crap yourself and pray it doesn't like the smell. ;f

    As a grown man your not exactly on the top of the grocery list for either black bears or lions. You might get stalked by a lion, but they rarely attack and when they do it's rarely fatal. You probably won't even know it unless you come across it's tracks.

    A .45 will take down a lion without too much trouble as long as you shoot it someplace vital. Actually hitting a charging cat is another story. Those things are quick and they can jump like nobody's business. If you are attacked, hope it spends enough time chewing on your one hand that you can draw and fire with the other. You probably won't get any warning. Black bears are much clumsier. The only time I could see a black bear attacking is a sow with cubs. They don't want anything to do with people. The bears I've happened across up close I just yelled at and they ran away if they weren't already heading that direction. I don't know whether the .45 ACP will take out a bear, but it's better than nothing.

    A dog will do you the most good. They'll know what's up before you do and you'd be surprised how a dog or two can scare the wits out of a something.
     
  19. Weston

    Weston

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    .357 in lower woods and mountains. .44 magnum this time of year, especially in higher altitudes or latitudes.

    If you anticipate very large, dangerous bear (e.g. Alaska), go with a guide and both of you carry as backup a 3" 12 gauge with the 1st round chambered in #6, the 2nd 00, and the 3rd, 4th and 5th in 3" slugs. Pump action only – Model 870 is my recommendation. Sabot rounds. Take your first and second shots to its face, followed by one to the shoulder and the remainder to the heart.
     
  20. Walter45Auto

    Walter45Auto

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    .45-70. Ain't it Purty???


    ;g



    ;8 ;I