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Seating and crimping in the same step

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by XDRoX, Mar 16, 2010.

  1. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    I just read this on another forum. Is there any truth to this? I have been doing it in one step, but is it better to do it in two?
     
  2. AltiDude

    AltiDude

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    When I load 9mm and 38 spl I seat and crimp simultaneously with my Lee die. I do however use a second Lee factory crimp when I load .357 mag for my Ruger because of tight cylinders.
     

  3. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

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    Boy XD... you sure know how to stir the pot don't you. It's kinda like your FCD question, you're gonna find a divide as wide as the parting of the red sea.

    The answer is going to depend on what a particular loader is used to... after all we all tend to be a product of our experiences.

    There are lots and lots of loaders out there who cut their baby teeth on three die pistol sets and see no reason in the world to change... it's just kinda the way we grew up.

    Other loaders started after the four die system was introduced, that's hoe they learned... that's what they know and there is no reason to change.

    Is one system better than the other... I would suggest that it is merely a matter of opinion... there's been and awful lot of really good and accurate ammunition produced over the decades with a single seat/crimp die and I suspect that there is a lot of really good ammunition being produced with separate dies. Bottom line is that if you learn how to set a die, the intricacies and the intangibles... those things that come with practice and experience there is no need for a separate crimping die.

    On the other hand if one wishes to flatten out the learning curve and is more concerned with just producing shootable ammo and less concerned with doing it the more 'old school' way.

    Which ever way you choose you'll be producing ammo that is by far more accurate than you as a shooter will be capable of. Good luck.

    Jack
     
  4. Beware Owner

    Beware Owner NOT a victim.

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    Whenever you crimp a lead bullet without flaring first, you'll get shavings, regardless of if you seat in the same step or not.
     
  5. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    :supergrin:Sorry, there's just so much to learn. Your explanation is great though. Thanks
     
  6. HAMMERHEAD

    HAMMERHEAD

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    Billions of rounds have been seated and crimped at the same time. Lead bullets smear just a little because the case mouth is closing while the bullet is still going in, no biggie, jacketed bullets are tougher than the case, so no harm done.
    Plated bullets would probably benefit from separate seating and crimping more than the others.
    I don't crimp most auto pistol rounds (or flair/expand either) and I like to use competition seater dies for their straight line seating and they have no crimp capability.
    For revolver and/or lead bullets I seat and crimp separately.
     
  7. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Flaring really has nothing to do w/ it. Trying to set a bullet on an unflared case is a PITA.
     
  8. Three-Five-Seven

    Three-Five-Seven Señor Mombo Millennium Member

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    If your components are all correctly sized, and if your brass is all the same length, and if your seater/crimping die is adjusted perfectly, it is certainly possible to seat and crimp in one operation. If I can do it with 38/40s, it's possible with anything.

    However, all those "ifs" have to be satisfied. If there is any variation, or absence of crimp groove, or brass is inconsistent, then one is better off separating the two processes.

    Most of the time, with most components, it is possible to adjust the die so seating and crimping without shaving lead is possible. But, not always. Thus, the recommendation to separate the processes.

    ***Footnote: you'll notice that when people suggest separating seating and crimping on the internet it is in response to some bozo who is trying to do something fancy-smancy and atypical. Thus, you hear the advise here more than it actually is needed in the real world.
     
  9. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

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    Don't be sorry young'un... you're tryin' to learn and that's how you do it... by asking questions.

    Hell, on the very, very rare occasion that a lady agrees to spend time with me I have to ask her what I'm supposed to do. (So far there have been no double charges but a lot more squip loads than I'd like to admit. :crying:)


    Jack
     
  10. ept000

    ept000

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    I can't explain exactly why, but when I use a seperate crimp die my COAL will run all over the place. When I seat and crip in one die the problem goes away. Needless to say I seat and crimp with one die on a regular basis.
     
  11. dudel

    dudel

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    Not really. Use a bevel base projectile with an inline seater, and no problem. For rifle, use a boattail with an inline seater. Rifle rounds don't even get a flare (they do get the neck expanded; but very little.)

    You either flare the case or use a projectile with a tapered base, don't have to do both.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2010
  12. glocknick

    glocknick

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    i have always crimped and seated in one step.
     
  13. Beware Owner

    Beware Owner NOT a victim.

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    I'm sorry, this just seems contradictory. :dunno:
     
  14. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    Yes, but die set-up is critical. I recently bought a Lee 45 Colt die set & their FCD came with it. Since I have it I use it. I've been switching between the 45 colt & 45 Schofield & it's very easy to adjust the FCD to either round. With many handgun loads I look for good bullet tension & adjust the seat/crimp die high enough to add no crimp.
     
  15. BK63

    BK63

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    What I have found with revolvers is that if I seat and crimp in the same step it depends on the bullet. On jacketed soft point stuff the soft point tends to get a little flattened out because it's starting to crimp before it's finished being seated. On hard cast stuff I have no problems at all. On auto stuff I always seat and then taper crimp seperately. It just works better for me.
     
  16. RustyFN

    RustyFN

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    That is strange, it would be interesting to know why.
    Nothing wrong with crimping and seating in the same die. I always crimp in a separate die. I change bullet profiles a lot it it just makes it easy to keep them separate.
     
  17. Steve in PA

    Steve in PA

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    About 19 years of reloading, all my handgun calibers have been reloaded using the seat and crimp in the same step.
     
  18. creophus

    creophus Born Again

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    If I have a seperate crimp die, I use it. If not, I seat and crimp on the same die. Not that big a deal.