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Seasoning a cast iron skillet, version 844

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by powernoodle, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. powernoodle

    powernoodle

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    1 - coat with a thin layer of Crisco (I used stick, not liquid)
    2 - place in 500 degree oven
    3 - turn on whole-house fan
    4 - turn off oven after 2 hours


    The skillet looks like it has been spray-painted black. The crisco molecules have emancipated most of their electrons, retaining only those necessary for carbonization. Two more treatments and the skillet will be diamond-encrusted.

    [​IMG]
    Skillet is so black that it absorbs light, making it almost impossible to see. Scientists are amazed and delighted. 911 nominated for 2004 Nobel Prize in carbon physics.

    cheers
     
  2. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    Real men use lard.

    [​IMG]
     

  3. powernoodle

    powernoodle

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    They eat lard, but they season their skillets with Crisco.
     
  4. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    I'm just funnin' ya. I forgot to add the smiley. So for good measure I'll drop the dancing 'nana.

    ^5

    That damn thing always makes me laugh
     
  5. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    I find that going to 500 degree temperature is the only way to get a good seasoning on cast iron cookware.

    I have no idea why the manufacturers instruction usually say 350 degrees, it does not come out seasoned at that low of a temperature.

    BTW, you will want to have some windows open too. There will be smoke.
     
  6. G23Adam

    G23Adam .- -.. .- --

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    my great grandmother always said to do it outside in the firepit... it's how my mother's 100 year old one was done...








    with Lard ;)


    ;f ;f
     
  7. jilverthor

    jilverthor

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    Praise the Lard

    ;f ;f ;f

    (and there is actually a resturant around here that has that for a slogan)
     
  8. modgun

    modgun CLM

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    Reminds me of the time my brother had his gfriend over for dinner at my parents house. Being eager to help after dinner he and she started on the dishes as the rest of us were clearing the table. Unnoticed by anyone the first thing she did was throw my dads skillet in the sink and she washed the hell out of it. She had been scrubbing it for over 5 minutes when someone noticed. Too late. She surely thought we were all crazy when every one of us (6 others) dropped what we were doing and said noooo!!! The pan was my dads and his grandmothers before him. I have no idea how old it was.

    I was about 17 at the time and that was the first time I ever saw it washed as opposed to just wiped.
     
  9. Nalapombu

    Nalapombu Millennium Member

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    By using the 500 degree temp you are far exceeding the smoke point of the oil. That is why it is best to use peanut oil for applications where you are going to do a lot of frying and use high heat. The crisco, vegiie oil, olive oil and a lot of others will start to smoke way too soon and you'll lose what you had the oil there for. That is why they recommend 350. That is also why you have to turn on your whole house fan.
    If you want to use that high of a temp, go to a different oil, one with a much higher smoke point.

    Nala
     
  10. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    At 350 degrees, the cast iron cookware comes out a sticky caramel color. Even with daily use, the cast iron does not get a black seasoning.

    You gotta use the high heat for the initial seasoning.
     
  11. seb

    seb

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    I seasoned mine at 350degrees and everything sticks to it. If I go back and season it again, will it help with the cleaning up??

    Terrie
     
  12. powernoodle

    powernoodle

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    Terrie, if you season it at high heat (500 degrees) you get a surface that is slick, almost like teflon.

    I originally tried it at 300, and all I got was a sticky goo and no carbon. You really have to incinerate it.

    cheers
     
  13. jawjaboy

    jawjaboy Casual lead ho

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    Why smoke up the house? Use a gas grill.....outside.
     
  14. SouthernGal

    SouthernGal What's Up Dox?

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    Who the heck would buy a new one? Down here (South, MS) we inherit them. I've got my great grandmother's square one, probably close to 100 years old. My friend got a new one tried to season it and it busted for her.

    For those unlucky enough to not get part of the inheritance, I'd advise going to an antique shop and carefully picking out a "new" old one.
     
  15. powernoodle

    powernoodle

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    I am happy to say that the skillet at issue is not new. It was given to me in poor condition, sporting rust rather than a layer of carbon. My father, a former tool and die maker, liberated it of its rust, at which point it was my obligation to give it a proper blackening.

    I am currently in search of something else to "season", but have found that few things will survive 2 hours at 500 degrees. May try one of my AK-47's.

    best regards
     
  16. SouthernGal

    SouthernGal What's Up Dox?

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    When I went to Mountain Home, AR I bought a new "old" skillet for an old BF of mine.

    We took his, smeared it with crisco, then threw it on the grill for hours at a time.

    Be sure to watch yours for "pitting" if it is old.
     
  17. JPinAZ

    JPinAZ

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    I'd run it through the self cleaning cycle of your oven first. That way everything that's currently on there will burn off & you can start with a fresh base. If your oven doesn't have a self-cleaning cycle, crank your grill as high as it will go & throw it on for a few hours.
     
  18. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

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    And you might take the batteries out of your smoke alarm before you do it in the house.

    I saw a grown woman cry once. While she was in the hospital for a few days giving birth, her husband cleaned the house. He noticed how crusty and black her old cast iron skillet was, so he took it to work and had them sand blast it down to white metal. She was not happy.

    I have gone through the seasoning process a few times. Lost a few in divorce property settlements.:( I can never get them right by just greasing and heating them. It takes a few months (or years) of actual use to get it right. Yes, the cornbread tastes like metal for the first 20 or 30 times. But the dogs don't seem to mind.

    NRA_guy
     
  19. bayerta

    bayerta Former Marine

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    They don't last forever. I can still remember the day my grandmothers' large skillet just popped in half. It was a sad day for all involved. It had been in the family for about 100 years.

    I would imagine that the cheaper made ones today probably wouldn't last quite that long. I would definately look for vintage.
     
  20. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    Lodge mfg makes quality cast iron cookware.