Searing [thawed] frozen tuna ...

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by Stainless Chili, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Stainless Chili

    Stainless Chili Very concerned

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    Is it healthy to eat formerly frozen tuna that is basically raw in the middle?

    A friend made it, and it turned her innards out. But I've eaten it from fresh tuna, with no worries.

    I want to make a recipe, with the tuna seared at a zillion degrees for twenty seconds each side.

    Serve with pickled seaweed [seaweed salad], ginger,wasabi, and rice.

    Thanks
     
  2. noway

    noway

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    will thousands of people eat it ( raw ) fish everyday and it called sushi.

    So that should answer your question.
     

  3. Stainless Chili

    Stainless Chili Very concerned

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    Sure. I've had sushi.

    I was wondering if freezing the fish takes away from the flavor. I'm betting it does, but to what degree, a query I pose to the GT community at large?
     
  4. S2nd

    S2nd One happy cat

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    My personal experience: it makes a more noticable difference when you use little or no seasoning. I'm occasionally in the habit of freezing marinated meat, and I once cooked a marinated salmon steak right out of the freezer that still had pink in the middle. Still tasted great, and even my friend, who doesn't like fish, complemented on the flavor.

    I'm told that all fish you buy in a market was previously frozen, but I haven't had a fresh catch in years to compare, and it doesn't quite make sense why they would mark some packages "previously frozen" and not others. Unless it's like pasteurizing, where it's only done to the level required to destroy microscopic baddies.
     
  5. allanc

    allanc "Inconceivable"

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    You can do it but make sure the fish is thoroughly thawed. Ahi popsicles are no fun to eat. Do your thawing in the refrigerator. It takes longer but it works.

    One of my favorite ways to sear tuna steaks is to liberally coat with cajun seasoning and then sear in a small amount of olive oil. I usually go for a 1/4 cooked ring on both sides. Remove from the pan and squeeze lime juice over the tuna. Then I use a dipping sauce made from wasabi paste and Ranch dressing.
     
  6. Stainless Chili

    Stainless Chili Very concerned

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    Alright, I coked it the way I thought it was to be cooked.
    Heat up the olive oil until it starts to smoke, 20 seconds per side.

    Only the outside eighth cooked, and the inside was blood red.
    I was looking for a more gradual cooking,
    so the flesh goes from a light grey to a pink center.

    More heat, or less heat and slower?

    The local Korean supermarket had nice Japanese seaweed salad, but the stuff I got at Reading Terminal Market was better, with a hint more of sesame and peanut oil.
     
  7. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    You did it right...
    Tuna Tataki is cooked just as you described...
    3/16 of an inched cooked on each side and raw-like in the middle...

    Ya need that raw section in the middle to keep it tender...

    That's da dish...

    It's all in the seasoning and sauces...

    If ever you forget about it and cook it thru, just refrigerate it and use it for tuna salad the next day...

    And yeah, almost all tuna was flash-frozen before you get it...
    That's actually what makes it fresh believe it or not...

    We get that Wakame 'seaweed' Salad at the Asian markets too...

    ;c
     
  8. Stainless Chili

    Stainless Chili Very concerned

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  9. Stainless Chili

    Stainless Chili Very concerned

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    What I wanted, Wild Bill , was a cooking into the top and bottom third ... a grey look. And a soft pink in the middle third, rather than a bright red.

    First time out, the middle was still cool/cold!
    Do I want to let the fillet set out for an hour or so to bring it closer to room temperature?

    One thing, I threw it back on the pan twice; the second time it was still deep red bloody within - turned the wife off.

    Third time in the pan, it was pretty much cooked all the way through.

    Too much olive oil impregnated the flesh; a blackened oil, it was.

    Maybe I want to try a thinner fillet?

    The shop will slice what I want. I picked one fillet to experiment. About an inch thick.

    Maybe a 0.7" filet for Attempt #2? Or sear in one hot pan, and transfer to a cooler pan? But this overrides the instructions of "sear 20 seconds on each side].

    Bottom line, no gastrointestinal problems so far. But cutting pure red, with stringy white tendons here and there, is unappetizing to view.

    It's got to look good as well as taste good, to get the respect and confidence of the guests.

    The marina at which I first tried this had the look I want. And the taste was stellar.

    That was the Sand Bar, Beaufort, N.C. A day, late, at Pawley's Island Tavern, Pawley's Island, S.C., they had it on the menu for $8.00; $12 in NC day before, with more fixings. Free in both instances, but still, it was served the same as any paying customer.


    Clue me in with more esoteria on the cooking process?
     
  10. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    You can sear it in a hot pan, then pop it in an oven till it's cooked 'just right',
    but it's very tricky...

    And yeah, you should start with room temperature meat...
    That way the middle will get to temp faster...

    It you WANTED it raw-like in the middle, you'd start with COLD meat...

    Cuts with the white stringys in there are not the best cut for this dish.

    Cooking Tuna is tricky... And a thinner filet will over-cook even faster...

    If you want a moist middle yagotta have at least an inch thickness...

    ;c