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Scrapple and syrup

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by jthuang, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. jthuang

    jthuang On The Jazz

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    Maybe this should be in the Pennsylvania Forum because not many people outside the Pennsylvania area know about (or will eat) scrapple.

    For the uninitiated, scrapple is a creation of the Pennsylvania Dutch. Loosely defined, it's pork "leftovers" with spices and cornmeal. You don't want to know what's in the "leftovers". It comes from the store (in the refrigerated section) as a nondescript gray block of matter. You cook it by slicing it and throwing it on a plan and frying at medium/low temperature. Most of the time you don't need any oil but I use non-fat cooking spray.

    Oh, it's not very good for you nutrition-wise. Figure 15% of your RDA of saturated fat for a 2 oz slice.

    There are different varieties of scrapple. The original is probably the best, but I like Rapa's Hot & Spicy scrapple. There is also Scrapple with Bacon, also made by Rapa.

    My usual MO is to cut them into thin slices so they come out nice and crispy. However, most people will cut it into thicker blocks which creates a nice crispy outside and a softer inside.

    I try not to have any in the house because if I stockpiled it I would eat it 24/7. I got my first taste of scrapple as a Boy Scout (Troop 57, Kennett Square) in the early 1980s. Nothing like a slab of scrapple with your breakfast while at camp, cooked over a fire or on a Coleman propane stove.

    Recently I heard about eating scrapple with maple syrup. Never had it like that. ^8 So I tried it last night. Fried up some Rapa Hot and Spicy scrapple (my favorite) and poured on some New Hampshire maple syrup.

    I dunno, I wasn't impressed. I think I might get better results if (1) I used regular scrapple instead of Hot and Spicy; and (2) I cut the scrapple into thicker blocks. My usual way of cooking it produces scrapple that doesn't soak up very much syrup.

    Anyway, thanks for listening to my random ramble about food. I'm getting hungry just thinking about it.
     
  2. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    Yea well, you made me hungry but for what I'm not sure. I think if it's not going to be good for me I'll stick with side pork but actually I think I'm gonna fire up the grill and do some ribs...;)
     

  3. Stephen

    Stephen Hola! Millennium Member

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    Never tried scrapple but I can say that I love sausage/bacon dipped in my pancake syrup. Yum!
     
  4. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    My wifes driving through PA as we speak, er ah, as I type. Maybe I'll call her and have her stop at a local store...
     
  5. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    I bought a block of it last week, and it's in my freezer right now...

    I love da stuff!

    1/4" sliced, fried crispy on the outsides, with just about 3/16" of creamy texture on the insides...

    ...with runny fried egg yolkies usually, syrup sometimes...

    I'm not judgin' you tho...

    ;) ;c

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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  7. DonCT

    DonCT

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    You're not kidding about that. I went to shoot sporting clays in Allentown with a native Pennsylvanian and she made us stop for breakfast at some out of the way local joint. She had four helpings of scrapple that day because no one else at the table would eat it.


    Mmmmm, snouts and ovaries ;0
     
  8. EUPHER49

    EUPHER49

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    I love the stuff. There's another similar concoction called Pan Pudding that some scrapple lovers won't even eat. I do, and love it, but it's one of those foods that if you over eat it and get sick, you'll never eat it again.

    I've had scrapple with syrup but prefer it plain or with a little ketchup. There's a variation called ponhaus that contains more "leftovers" to give a higher meat to corn meal ratio. My butcher used to make this variety... and then there's corn meal mush...no meat at all.

    For those of you who buy locally and know what scrapple costs, check out the price of this mail order stuff!

    https://www.seltzersbologna.com/StoreFront/IAFDispatcher

    The PA Dutch are very frugal people and when butchering pigs, they use everything but the squeal...
     
  9. Rabid Rabbit

    Rabid Rabbit

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    I've been eating scrapple w/syrup for 40 years, I alsways thought it was a southern thing.. My moms family has been eating it for years but in N.C. not PA. I've been trying to find some that is made without wheat flour. My 2 year old is sensitive to wheat and he loves scrapple. If I can't find any I'll have to make my own.
     
  10. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    I have never had it, but I do know what it is ;)
     
  11. EUPHER49

    EUPHER49

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    Here ya go...it's easy.

    http://philadelphia.about.com/gi/dy...p://www.gardenguides.com/recipes/scrapple.htm

    I'd replace the water with chicken broth...IMHO
     
  12. Miss Maggie

    Miss Maggie

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    Is scrapple anything like souse meat? Anyway, thinking about scrapple got me thinking about souse meat and I sent to the store for some. It's good with crackers.
     
  13. Rabid Rabbit

    Rabid Rabbit

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    If what you call souse meat is a collection of pork meats/parts held together by gelatin, the answer is no.
     
  14. Miss Maggie

    Miss Maggie

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    That pretty well describes it. It is different then, but it's good, too.
     
  15. Rabid Rabbit

    Rabid Rabbit

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    EUPHER49
    Thanks for the link. Looks easy, and I just happen to have two pork loins in the freezer. I have everything else, I'll just use oat flour instead of wheat.
     
  16. EUPHER49

    EUPHER49

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    sorry about that link in the above post. I thought I edited it to a different one when I realized the recipe had wheat flour in it. I remember from my younger days that the PA Dutch didn't use flour so I thought it was all made without.

    Again my apologies. Here's a link to a version which is more familiar to me and doesn't have wheat flour.

    http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/sleuth/0998/dutch.html

    Again the recommendation to use chicken broth instead of water...


    ...oh and BTW, I just finished a luscious hunk of Martin's Pork Tongue Souse...mmmmm
     
  17. jthuang

    jthuang On The Jazz

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    Yeah, I remember corn meal mush -- also from my Boy Scout days. I went to the local Super G last week to find some and they didn't have it. Normally it's in the same area as scrapple (and they had plenty of that) so I don't know what's the deal.

    Never had ponhaus. With the "meat" that's in scrapple I'm not sure I want to think about a higher "meat to corn meal ratio". ;f
     
  18. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    You can make a good scrapple by cooking breakfast sausage crumbled and mixing with stock and oatmeal.

    Let the oatmeal cook use enough stock that the result is thinner than oat meal.

    Pour it in a greased loaf pan let sit in the fridg to set.

    Slice and fry --tastes good and no wheat. And the price is good.
     
  19. USMCSKI

    USMCSKI Sgt USMC 97-02

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    I ate scrapple when I was a small child. When I got older and was able to read the lable I stopped eating it!
    I kinda miss it now....may have to get some when I go back to Jersy.
     
  20. EUPHER49

    EUPHER49

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    I got ambitious over the weekend and made the recipe I posted above, and it
    is really easy and turned out very tasty. It fried up really crisply and didn't fall apart in the pan. What's really nice about it is that the only meat that's in the recipe is ground pork. I used a cheap boneless roast, and put it through my
    Kitchen Aid grinder one time with the coarse die. I did use water instead of the chicken broth and the 20 minute boiling time before adding the cornmeal
    made its own nice broth. In retrospect, the grind of the meat was a bit coarse
    compared to store bought scrapple but was a neat twist to the "usual." I think the coarseness of the grind can be up to individual taste. For more authentic taste I guess one could substitute some liver for some pork.


    I ate it plain though...no syrup.