Sci Fi, oldie but a goodie

Discussion in 'The Book Rack' started by nmstew, May 10, 2007.

  1. nmstew

    nmstew

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    I read the foundation trilogy by Issac Azimov (the original rilogy included Foundation, Foundation and Empire, and Second Foundation), IT WAS AWESOME!!!! I started reading it because I heard it was the basis for ALOT of other works I like. This series was written 50 years ago and that actually makes it better. I know alot of people who are put off by Sci Fi now because modern stuff is all rip-offs of star wars and star trek, but this old stuff was way before all that, back when you needed plot. I'd highly recommend.
     
  2. spork

    spork Caffeinator

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    I may take your recommendation into consideration. I have decided to do some "classic" sci-fi reading this year,and was wondering where a good place was to start.
     

  3. Willard

    Willard Who, me?

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    Asimov and Heinlein should keep you busy... and satisfied.
     
  4. jacquejet

    jacquejet

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    Try Heinlein's "Time Enough for Love." There are several books in the Lazurus Long series and this one is the first (I think).
     
  5. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

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    If you want old school sci-fi, go REALLY old school. Try Jules Verne's "20,000 Leagues under the Sea". The book is MUCH better than any film adaptation and you will be amazed to find nuclear power, SCUBA tanks, environmentalism, and a lot of other "futuristic" ideas discussed in a book 137 years old.

    If you can make it through the first few books, E.E. Smiths Lensman series is really good, has that bombastic flair missing from most modern fiction.
     
  6. vi9er

    vi9er Guest

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    Heinlein is one of the few authors i can read over and over again. VERY pro rights also.

    One of my favorite books of his is Starship Troopers. Don't be turned of by the fetid pile of whale feces they passed off as the movie adaptation, and give it a try.

    Vi9er
     
  7. USDefender

    USDefender Lay Them Waste!

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    Verne is my favorite author.

    He wrote in a time when the industrial revolution was ushering his country into the next century - circumstances that were, in turn, causing fear & untertainty amongst the people. (It wasn't unlike our country now-days, right after the turn of the 21st Century).

    If you like Verne, read his most recently discovered & published (1994) novel Paris in the Twentieth Century. It was written in 1863, before 20,000 Leagues... and it doesn't have the 'happy ending' that we Americans like to have in our stories. Never the less, it's incredible to see all of the modern technological advancements and human attitudes that he was able to extrapolate from the information available to him at the end of the Victorian Era (including, IMO, the results of socialism).