SAS mission to kill a Baghdad suicide squad

Discussion in 'Veteran's Forum' started by GreenBeret1631, Nov 20, 2005.

  1. GreenBeret1631

    GreenBeret1631

    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Location:
    Pacific NW - Puget Sound
    SAS mission to kill a Baghdad suicide squad


    Revealed: SAS mission to kill a Baghdad suicide squad

    By Sean Rayment, Defence Correspondent
    20/11/2005 Sunday telegraph

    The SAS killed three suicide bombers in Baghdad as part of an undercover, shoot-to-kill operation in Iraq, it can be revealed.

    The three terrorists were all killed by SAS snipers armed with specialist rifles. Each terrorist was wearing a suicide vest laden with commercial explosives. It is understood that they were intending to target cafes and restaurants frequented by members of the Iraqi security forces.

    A 16-man unit of the SAS, acting on intelligence obtained by an Iraqi agent working for the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), shot dead the would-be bombers in a combined SAS and American operation in July this year.

    Details of the mission codenamed Operation Marlborough have remained secret until now - primarily because it was launched in the same week that a Metropolitan Police firearms unit in London shot dead Jean Charles de Menezes, a 27-year-old Brazilian electrician, in the mistaken belief that he was a suicide bomber.

    It marked one of the most successful counter-insurgency operations undertaken by British forces since the start of the Iraq conflict. It is the first time it has become clear that the SAS is working with American special forces on a permanent basis in Iraq.

    The troops were part of Task Force Black, the coalition's special forces unit based in Baghdad. It is composed of a squadron of SAS troopers and members of the Delta Force - the clandestine American army special forces unit - plus other elements of British and American forces. It acts on intelligence gathered by a network of Iraqi spies working for the CIA and MI6.

    The unit only undertakes "black", or covert, operations and is one of the few coalition units in Iraq with the specific task of launching attacks against suicide bombers.


    Snipers' head shots had to kill terrorists simultaneously to prevent explosions
    20/11/2005

    Early on a warm summer morning, a few hours before traffic began to fill the streets, a 16-man SAS patrol took up ambush positions around a Baghdad house, writes Sean Rayment.

    The soldiers had been told that the house was a being used as a base by insurgents - and up to three suicide bombers were expected to leave it later that morning.

    Dressed in explosive vests, they were fully equipped to hit a number of locations around the city. The bombers' targets were thought to be cafes and restaurants frequented by members of the Iraqi security forces.

    The intelligence was regarded as "high grade" and came from an Iraqi agent who had been nurtured by members of the British Secret Intelligence Service, also known as MI6, for several months.

    Expectation among the 16 soldiers, attached to Task Force Black (TFB), the secret American and British special forces unit based in the Iraqi capital, was high. Each member of the four four-man groups was a veteran of many missions where the intelligence promised much - only to deliver little.

    The plan for Operation Marlborough was simple: allow the three suspected bombers to leave the house and get into the street, then kill them with head shots from the four sniper teams. Each team was equipped with L115A .338 sniper rifles, capable of killing at up to 1,000 yards.

    The soldiers, liaising earlier with their commanders, had considered the option of entering the house and killing the terrorists - but that plan was regarded as too dangerous. The confines of the house would intensify the impact of any blast, killing everyone inside.

    The SAS soldiers were told that it was vital that the three bombers would have to be killed simultaneously.

    If one of them was allowed to detonate a device, scores of people could be killed or injured.

    In support of the covert sniper teams was a Quick Reaction Force (QRF), which would provide a dozen extra soldiers within a few minutes in an emergency. The QRF was based in a secure location nearby and a team of ammunition technical officers were on hand to defuse the bombs.

    A section of Iraqi police was also attached to the operation - although they were not briefed on the detail of the attack - to deal with any crowd trouble.

    Meanwhile, 2,000 feet above the city of five million inhabitants, a CIA-controlled Predator unmanned air vehicle was providing a real-time video feed back to the TFB headquarters deep inside the secure green zone.

    Shortly after 8am, Arabic translators, monitoring listening devices hidden inside the house, warned the operations centre inside the militarily controlled green zone that the three terrorist were on the move. The message "stand by, stand by" was dispatched to the four teams.

    As the terrorists entered the street, a volley of shots rang out and the three insurgents slumped to the ground.

    Each terrorist had been killed by a single head shot - the snipers having spent the past few days rehearsing the ambush in minute detail.

    The SAS troopers had been warned that only a direct head shot would guarantee that bombs would not be detonated.

    Only three of the four snipers fired, the fourth was to act as a back-up in case one of the weapons jammed or a sniper lost sight of his target.

    The message that the terrorists had been killed was sent back to the SAS headquarters and the troops moved forward to check the bodies for life. As they gingerly approached it became brutally apparent that the .338 calibre round - the biggest rifle bullet used by the Army - had done its job.

    Operation Marlborough was hailed as a complete success and one of the rare occasions on which the coalition has been able to deliver a decisive blow against suicide bombers.
     
  2. NCUrk

    NCUrk Shebha sees you

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Location:
    Havelock NC
    He who dares...
     

  3. Bonk

    Bonk Millennium Member

    Messages:
    1,232
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 1999
    As one of my old Gunnies would say, a .338 to the noggin will definitely give you a bad day! ;f

    .338 Lapua or .338 WinMag? I'm thinking Lapua.
     
  4. 4TS&W

    4TS&W 2A RKBA 4EVER

    Messages:
    3,585
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2002
    Location:
    here and there...
    What about the .50 BMG? Or is that not used by brits, or is it that the .50 is for "anti-material" uses... (Like a backpack :cool: )
     
  5. reconvic

    reconvic Recon Marine

    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Location:
    Mesa, Az.
    A .50 cal would be better on longer distances. That round has a effect which is also wanted. Think of hitting a watermelon with a Shotgun :0
    Vic





    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  6. Seabee71

    Seabee71 Hawaiian Boy

    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    Location:
    Gulfport, MS
    It is 338 Lapua. I think this is a newer version of the AWM (Arctic Warfare Magnum) This same rifle rocks in Counter Strike!
     
  7. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

    Messages:
    3,785
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    Renegade State
    Well done SAS - now go back, sit down with the D-boys and the informants, find some more & do it again. And keep doing it please.

    No therapy, no deals, no amnesty, no Hollywood civics classes, no buying back the 'bang' - just head shots. Done like that, attrition becomes very nice mathematically. Bet we have more individual rounds available than they have 'volunteers' - bloody well done!

    ;?