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I was shocked!!!!A customer wanted to purchase a Glock from a well known sporting goods store, and a Sales Rep stated the Glock was too difficult to breakdown and clean! The Salesman recommended a Smith M&P. Question: Is a Glock more difficult to breakdown and clean than a Smith M&P? I thought about speaking up, but...none of my business!!
 

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NozeBleedSpeed
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I was shocked!!!!A customer wanted to purchase a Glock from a well known sporting goods store, and a Sales Rep stated the Glock was too difficult to breakdown and clean! The Salesman recommended a Smith M&P. Question: Is a Glock more difficult to breakdown and clean than a Smith M&P? I thought about speaking up, but...none of my business!!
Not hardly. Many counter monkeys just hate Glocks. One should never ask advice from someone working retail in a minimum wage position about anything technical.
 

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HAT SQUAD
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Prolly just a die-hard Smith and Wesson pragmatist sales clerk. I recall one place where the sales guy was a Colt fanatic and when he sold anything else he acted as if the buyer was making a mistake.

That was pre-Glock days, of course.
 

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GUNS UP
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No harm no foul. If a customer can't make their own educated selection than who really cares.
 

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Giggity-Goo!!!
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That's BS. Glocks are way easier. Next time, ask the sales person to demonstrate a field strip between the two guns.

With an M&P, there's an extra procedure. In order to remove the slide you have to push down the magazine disconnect...and sometimes it comes back up, therefore having to start the process over again.

The culprit:
 

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No harm no foul. If a customer can't make their own educated selection than who really cares.

Agreed...it is up to the customer to research brands, models, and prices. If they don't, then it is their own fault. I am compulsive about this in fact, but still feel like I have made bad decisions...guess I am one of those "buyer's remorse" types, I question purchases even after the deal is done, and I am happy with what I bought.

There are people that go to car lots, and buy whatever the salesman steers them to, and pay the sticker price...why would gun purchases be different? :dunno::faint:
 

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NozeBleedSpeed
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The shop I deal with most has some nice, hardworking guys in it, but they all have personal opinions that may differ from others. We argue but its because we know each other. They usually try to give regular customers whatever they ask for.

I ordered some LMTs through the shop. When they came in, all the counter guys wanted to see them and know why I ordered them. They thought the S&W and RRA were every bit as good. General consensus was that I wasted my time.
I bought some Colt 6920s and a couple of them told me Colt just charges more for the name. The guns are the exact same as every other AR. I told them that Im just stupid that way.
Same guys wonder why I won't spend more for a "better" AK.
 

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I've heard a lot worse things in the form of biased and uneducated babble come out the mouths of gun counter clerks. It's usually not much better at bonafide "gun stores" (as opposed to large chain retail stores). Any increase in education they may have is often overshadowed proportionately (or moreso) by bias.

When it comes to service, you get what you pay for (and it ain't much for someone showing you a gun, typically).
 

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I own both and I find the M&P mildly easier to take down. Heck, I had a nightmare of a time cleaning my 1911 for the first time...god knows how long I was looking for the pieces lol. But now it's no problem. Not being as easy to clean or strip is not as important as how well the gun fits in your hand, how reliable it is, and how well you shoot it.

Did he tell the customer that the finish on the Glock is far superior to that of the M&P?
Customers are really relying on the employees of gun stores right now. Many people are buying their first firearm and need all the info they can get. Most aren't willing to spend the time we spend learning and obsessing about firearms. That employee or some other knowledgeable customer/friend is the best info they are going to get.

Personally, I have no problems stepping in between a customer and an employee if the employee is flat out lying or doesn't know what he is talking about. Is it wrong of me to do that? Maybe, but I'd rather have someone who becomes a life long gun lover than someone who has a bad experience and goes over to the dark side.
 

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NozeBleedSpeed
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I've heard a lot worse things in the form of biased and uneducated babble come out the mouths of gun counter clerks. It's usually not much better at bonafide "gun stores" (as opposed to large chain retail stores). Any increase in education they may have is often overshadowed proportionately (or moreso) by bias.

When it comes to service, you get what you pay for (and it ain't much for someone showing you a gun, typically).
Bingo!
 

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ive only ever met one guy who didnt seem too biased towards his own carry gun. thats the guy that went through every gun in the counter with my wife for 2 hours and then she decided which one she wanted. i could have gotten a better price elsewhere but it was worth the experience for her.
 

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I was shocked!!!!A customer wanted to purchase a Glock from a well known sporting goods store, and a Sales Rep stated the Glock was too difficult to breakdown and clean! The Salesman recommended a Smith M&P. Question: Is a Glock more difficult to breakdown and clean than a Smith M&P? I thought about speaking up, but...none of my business!!
You guys are missing the point. The clerk was 100% correct. Glocks are much more difficult to breakdown and clean.

First of all you never want to stop shooting it, its hard to break a gun down while its flawlessly cycling rounds.

Second you have to clean it more often because its not a safe queen that shoots like crap so you never take it out.

The clerk saved that person a lot of money on the cost of ammo and additional funds spent on the additional Glocks that would soon follow.
 

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I think that I would have made the comment, "Glocks are the easiest weapons to field strip that I've ever owned". Then I would have walked away.
 

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Nagant-ophile
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All he had to do was act like he was from Missouri... "Show me". :whistling:

Unfortunately, if he didn't take the time to learn for himself before going shopping, he will have to live with 'his' decision.
 

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When I worked the counter, I made it a point to demostrate to new gun owners how to take down different guns. I've sold a dont know how many G30s to people who were unsure of the recoil in a small .45 by letting them shoot mine in the test fire pit. Anything that I could do to help the customer I would. As far as break downs go, some people have problems grabbing the tabs to break Glocks down so that could go either way. I personally think that Glocks are easier, but the M&Ps aren't hard. I tried to keep my opinion out of it unless I was asked. An example would be, I personally don't care for the XDs, but I still think that they're good guns. They just don't fit me personally. I'd tell the customers just that too. That I don't personally care for them, because they don't fit me, but they're fine guns.
 

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That's BS. Glocks are way easier. Next time, ask the sales person to demonstrate a field strip between the two guns.

With an M&P, there's an extra procedure. In order to remove the slide you have to push down the magazine disconnect...and sometimes it comes back up, therefore having to start the process over again.

The culprit:
Actually, it's the sear deactivation lever that has to be depressed in order to release the striker.

The magazine disconnect safety (pictured in the image you posted) is the straight stainless lever to the inboard (right) side of the sear deactivation lever, and it's tensioned downward by its own spring. Inserting a magazine into the magazine well will push the lever upward, holding it against the tension of its spring which tries to push the lever down. The magazine disconnect safety lever must be lifted against its spring tension by a magazine in order for it to remain in the up position.

FWIW, the sear deactivation lever pictured in your image is one of the early ones which has the dog-leg bend to it. The bend required that the lever must be in the downward position for reassembly of the slide onto the frame. The newer lever has a straighter angle to it. We were told this revision was made because some LE customers couldn't remember to keep the lever in the downward position during reassembly, and that the slide would hit the lever and could damage it. The current lever is straight and will clear the slide if left in the up position.

Now, if the gun shop sales person had been helpful to the customer, he would've explained that the Glock requires the owner to pull the trigger in order to disassemble the gun for filed-stripping, while the striker could be released in the M&P without having to pull the trigger by simple the extra step of depressing the sear deactivation lever. Pushing the lever all the way down the first time is not difficult.

Also, instead of having to retract the slide slightly and simultaneously depress both ends of the slide lock lever as on the Glock, the M&P only needs to have the takedown latch rotated 90 degrees.

The customer could then make his/her choice on which design better pleases them.

Not everyone spends as much extra time reading their manual and practicing field-stripping as the enthusiasts who take the time to find internet firearms forums, you know. ;)

I've frequently had to help owners of Glocks field-strip their guns because they couldn't remember how to depress the slide lock lever on both ends after they slightly retracted their slides, or else they retracted the slides too far. Believe it or not, there really are folks who are not exactly at ease with the field-stripping requirements of the Glock design.

Then there are folks who are not at all comfortable with having to pull the trigger in order to initiate field-stripping ... and yes, some of these folks are also ill at ease with the notion of dry-fire, it seems.

Some of these same type of folks (not gun enthusiasts, but simply gun owners or gun users) have issues with other designs, as well.

I agree that most times I have need to enter a gun store I more often than not hear something incredibly silly, ill-informed or downright wrong being told to some customer looking at a handgun at the counter. It's amazing what's usually explained about various ammunition designs, as well.
 

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Maybe S&W was offering spiff money to the sellers as incentive, just like they were giving away the free extra mag to the buyers as incentive. 30+ years ago when I was in college, I worked at a place called Pacific Stereo. Every week, we'd get a list of which products had spiff money tied to them. That's what I'd push that week. It generally made a huge difference in my paycheck. Plus, it was cash out at the end of the shift on any spiffs. Beer money.
 
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