close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Safety Way To Store Bulk Primers...

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Kwesi, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. Kwesi

    Kwesi

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    TX
    I was reading a V-V Reloading Guide and they state:

    "Do not store primers in bulk. Doing so will create a bomb! Bulk primers will very likely mass detonate. The blast of a few hundred primers corresponds to a hand grenade in a room"!

    I have thousands stored in my office furniture most of which are in the cardboard as shipped. I keep the powder in the same room but inside a closet.

    What is the safe way?
     
  2. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    8,054
    Likes Received:
    290

  3. ModGlock17

    ModGlock17

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2010
    Messages:
    5,604
    Likes Received:
    2,857
    Location:
    DisneyWorld
    I am not sure how they would define "bulk". I've seen pictures in the old days where they'd keep a cup full of them in a glass jar. They would move and collide with each others as you move the jar. Is that considered bulk?

    In the semiconductor industry, we'd ship stored micromachined chips in tubes. It would be fine if the chips were encased in plastic, but not ceramic housing. Simple collision from one ceramic package to another, in a plastic tube, was documented in the thousands of G-force, which subsequently destroys internal parts of the chip.

    So in a glass jar, I can see the danger of sloshing around bare primers inside.

    I'd like to think we've gotten smarter over the years.

    Primers are now sold in plastic trays, which cushion them from shock. I would think that is deemed safe and adequate enough to be shipped by UPS and couriers. So unless they are stored on train cars, the worst handling of them is over as soon as they got to your hand.

    Another issue to ponder, is if primers are so dangerous then everytime you drop a round on a ceramic floor that round would go off !!! But they don't, to my experience, not that I'd drop them for fun...

    Cheers
     
  4. dhgeyer

    dhgeyer

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2011
    Messages:
    493
    Likes Received:
    5
    That is kind of alarming, isn't it! I've got about 4000 in the original boxes in my desk drawer. Yikes!

    I suppose I could place each 100 primer pack in a different place around the house, and then try to find them when I need them. Kind of like an Easter egg hunt. Nah.

    I could buy packs of primers one or two at a time when I need them. With that Dillon progressive press downstairs: Nah.

    I could solve the problem completely by storing them immersed in oil. Nah.

    I could build a bomb proof container of some kind, and put them all in there. Nah.

    I could install a sprinkler system in the house. Actually that might not be a bad idea. In addition to the primers, I've got a bunch of propellent powders around. I'll do that when I get a round tuit. Nobody has given me one yet.

    Not coming up with any real good ideas here. Maybe someone else has a good answer. Sorry.
     
  5. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    8,054
    Likes Received:
    290
    There are very specific legally binding storage requirements. NFPA sets the requirements and the Unifrom Fire Code incorporates the requirements. Cities and counties (and states) then pass laws or ordinances that require compliance the the various Uniform codes (as locally amended).

    Here is the NFPA document:
    http://www.nfpa.org/catalog/product.asp?pid=49510

    It's not that there aren't rules, it's that reloaders don't know about them and wouldn't care much about them even if they did know.

    What? The Fire Department is going to inspect your house? Before you have a fire? Not in this country!

    Even UPS has limits to how much can be carried on a single truck. I don't have any idea how Powder Valley schedules their shipments. Nor do I have any idea what their storage facility looks like. But it must be impressive!

    Richard
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  6. Kentguy

    Kentguy

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,985
    Likes Received:
    221
    Location:
    Kent, OH
    Kwesi,

    All ways keep them in their original shipping/packing containers. Now matter where you store them it must be in a cool dry place (same as powder). The "primer cabinet" is a great idea but some folks don't have the room or $$$ to spend, if you do go for it.

    For small amounts an ammo can(s) will work best

    Whatever method you choose I would recommend using a dehumidifier in the room or at the very least purchase some of these; [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Silica-Gel-Desiccants-Packets-Dry-Packs/dp/B004FC5VT4/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pdT1_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=1S14XSO817FHK&coliid=IMRFIYORHS7BN"]Amazon.com: Silica Gel Desiccants Packets - 7/8" X 1 1/2" - 1 Gram Packs - 20 Packets of Silica Gel - Dry-Packs Brand!: Home & Kitchen@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31TFEDeHL-L.@@AMEPARAM@@31TFEDeHL-L[/ame]

    Keep them with your primers in storage, remember besides an open flame moisture is your primers (and powders) worst enemy!
     
  7. JBnTX

    JBnTX 2 Timothy 2:15

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Messages:
    21,977
    Likes Received:
    7,072
    Location:
    Must Be Texas
    Store primers?
    I shoot them, I don't collect them.
     
  8. dkf

    dkf

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Messages:
    5,545
    Likes Received:
    204
    A storage cabinet made out of combustable material is a must.:faint:

    I would not pay any attention to the article. Stick the primers in an ammo can with one of those silica gel packs to store long term.

    If you have a good size house fire the primers, powder, ammo and everything is going to go up. Good luck trying to stop it even if you put it in a safe. Safes will get hot inside also. I figure if you want safety find another hobby.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  9. FullClip

    FullClip NRA Benefactor CLM

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    3,801
    Likes Received:
    325
    Location:
    On The Lake in The Maine Woods
    When was the last time there was a story in your local papers about a house blowing up due to improper primer storage??:dunno:


    Think that a meth lab gone bad makes the headlines a lot more often.:supergrin:
     
  10. fredj338

    fredj338

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Messages:
    23,877
    Likes Received:
    2,421
    Location:
    so.cal.
    Yes, proper storage is required. Putting them in a locked metal ammo can is not a good idea. In a firem that becomes a bomb as the priemrs start to cook off. Better is a wooden storage locker. There are legal limits to what one can store in their res but it isn't going to be checked until you have the fire & things start going bang. Powder burns, so is far safer to store. Still, there are rules when you go over 25#. Again, a wooden locker, separate from the primers, is the best way.
    Just be smart about it. Keep primers in original packaging. Don't store them near the furnace or in an attic space. If yo uhave a fire & can warn the fire dept, do so. It's alrady going to be ugly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  11. Kwesi

    Kwesi

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    TX
    Very interesting perspectives! It was the hand grenade analogy that got my attention.
     
  12. Kwesi

    Kwesi

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    TX
    I use the ones that are reusable. They come in a rectangular this can. When the crystals change color you put them in the oven around 350*.
     
  13. fredj338

    fredj338

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Messages:
    23,877
    Likes Received:
    2,421
    Location:
    so.cal.
    That i sprobably an exageration. It would depend on how they went off. Bundle 300 together in a small closed space, maybe. 300 in an opern container would be very bad, but not a handgrenade. The idea of 1000 thrown into a glass jar as some old timers used to do scares the crap out of me, but then I tend to be careful with this stuff.
     
  14. G29Reload

    G29Reload Tread Lightly

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    13,286
    Likes Received:
    366
    You can store more than that but fire regs recommend building a wooden locker to keep them in.

    I do believe 20 lbs is the limit you can transport in a car. The only time i ever exceeded that i think was when i moved.
     
  15. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    8,054
    Likes Received:
    290

    Actually, a 1" thick wooden cabinet is recommended for all kinds of flammable materials. Paints, solvents, powder and probably primers (I'm not sure about the primers but I am absolutely certain about the rest).

    The NFPA has a construction plan detailing how the corners are to be made and so on. Wood is a good material. It won't stop the fire forever but it will hold it back long enough for the Fire Department to do their thing.

    And the fire resistant paint helps!

    There's a brief discussion of the construction requirements here:
    http://www.ehs.psu.edu/help/info_sheets/flammable_liquid_storage_cabinet_faq.pdf

    Richard
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  16. ModGlock17

    ModGlock17

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2010
    Messages:
    5,604
    Likes Received:
    2,857
    Location:
    DisneyWorld
    Keep 'em at the in-law's house. There! Problem solved.

    LOL
     
  17. shotgunred

    shotgunred local trouble maker

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    9,125
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Washington (the state)
    I just do it the same way the gun shops do. In their own packages on a shelf.
     
  18. Three-Five-Seven

    Three-Five-Seven Señor Mombo Millennium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 1999
    Messages:
    2,748
    Likes Received:
    51
    Location:
    Great Southwest
    I always get wrapped around my own axle when this topic comes up. I get very concerned about my own situation. I worry and ask myself "what if?"

    Then, I remember that there are four vehicles in the garage attached to my house that (combined) have over fifty gallons of gasoline in them. And, I realize that would create a lot more problems than my "arsenal" would if the worst happened any my house caught fire.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  19. dkf

    dkf

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Messages:
    5,545
    Likes Received:
    204
    We never use wood cabinets or any of that crap out in industry and OSHA came through regularly. Flammables were stored in steel cabinets (made especially for storing flammables) with removable plugs for the firemen to stick a hose into.(like in your link) Notice they are NOT made of wood.(gee I wonder why) The same heat that would make paint bubble on the steel cabinet will burst the wood cabinet into flames.

    I actually have one at home they were throwing away at work. http://www.securallproducts.com/sec...le+storage&ei=UTF-8&fr=moz35&to=flammable.htm

    Primers in an ammo box are not under pressure or compressed in any way. There is airspace and when/if the primers go off the latch will fail and any blast will most likely go upward. One could argue the box could actually help contain the blast.

    Well then what would all the worry warts worry about? I can already see in the near future bright shiney blue Dillon primer and powder storage cabinets. Would sell like hotcakes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  20. fredj338

    fredj338

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Messages:
    23,877
    Likes Received:
    2,421
    Location:
    so.cal.
    If this were true, why does NFPA call for a wood storage locker for powder? Yes, I have seen metal & even concrete ones, but for the home owner, a wood footlocker works, is lockable & easily moved if needed during a fire. Maybe someone will sacrafice say 5K primers in a 30cal steel ammo can in a firepit & report back to us. It won't be me, not for $100 worth of primers.