???'s for the knowledgeable

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by Glkster19, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. Glkster19

    Glkster19

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    Just bought a Canon A710IS. I'm a long ways from a pro photographer so it looked like it was right up my alley. Point, shoot and I have pics. Question is this: There area a couple of different lenses Canon shows for this on their site but I'm not clear on if they will offer increased zoom or just take a wider field of view or what. Here is the link to the lenses I'm talking about:

    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=SNAModelSuppliesAct&fcategoryid=811&modelid=14117


    TIA for the help.
     
  2. Rusty Shackleford

    Rusty Shackleford mmhmm

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    I'm not an expert but I'm sure someone who knows better will post later on..

    The teleconverter should offer increased magnification and decreased field of view while the wide angle should offer increased field of view and decreased magnification.
     

  3. krinkov

    krinkov Shutter Maniac

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    you're definitely right! In simpler terms, use a teleconverter for distant subjects and a wide-converter to do group shots. the adapter is what you'll need to attach either of these lens add-ons. Generally, you will not need either attachment as any point and shoot is designed to cover the basic angles of view that you'll need whether for portraiture or family photos. Also, anything you will add to the "front element" of any lens be it a filter, close-up lens, wide or tele-converters will considerably degrade an image and require additional exposure so expect to sacrifice either shutter speed or increase your ISO setting when adding any lens attachments. More importantly, additional glass will cause unwanted "flare" or those bubble-like reflections on the image when shooting in brightly-lit or back-lighted situations. I also see no point in putting on the extra bulk on a fine point and shoot camera as they are intended to be compact, go anywhere and do anything. it's like putting optic sights and a folding stock on a Walther PPK!
     
  4. Glkster19

    Glkster19

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    I don't intend on leaving the additional lens on all the time. My thought on using it is for going to watch the Detroit Tigers play and to take some pics of the games. I agree that generally the std zoom is sufficient for general useage. As far as adding lenses, I understand that they're are filters for helping to reduce these glares. Will these filters not make a difference?

    I know I should've bought a Rebel, but I'm a long ways from a pro photographer and not well versed on all the manual settings and stuff with the SLR's. (Not to mention the price difference, spent all my money on Tiger tickets)
     
  5. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Filters are notorious for increasing glare by adding another glass pane with (usually) poorer coatings than the original lens. I would recommend against using filters for that purpose. You can either find a proper lens hood or just use your hat to shield your lens temporarily from stray or direct light.
     
  6. krinkov

    krinkov Shutter Maniac

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    True, a hood would be the best "accessory" on a lens although when attached using an adapter, you will lose some field of vision if you're like me who likes to use the rangefinder.